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  #151  
Old 25th June 2007, 08:12
non descript non descript is offline
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Terry, firstly, as it is your first day of posting a warm welcome to you, thank you for joining the community; enjoy the site and all it has to offer and we very much look forward to your postings, particuarly the photograph of "the world's favorite ship"
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  #152  
Old 25th June 2007, 10:04
Richard Nicholson Richard Nicholson is offline  
 
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Thanks Tonga! Nice photo of Thorpe Grange as well, thanks. Richard
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  #153  
Old 27th June 2007, 00:10
Dinah Dinah is offline  
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Thanks, Tonga. I'm having trouble posting photographs as they are too large and I haven't found a way of reducing them.
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  #154  
Old 27th June 2007, 01:35
tell tell is offline  
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Originally Posted by tell View Post
Tonga I didn't consult my discharge book i relied on my memory a big mistake,that's why i had the dates wrong, thanks for your remarks, brings back memories that are precious
Tonga I was reminiscing last night about my time on the Langton Grange and a funny happening came to mind, when we were signing on in Liverpool we were lined up in the Saloon and the coasting mate was signing us up, his name was Butler, the chap in front of me went to the table and when the mate asked his name he said Butler, the mate done a double take, so imagine my thoughts when I went up next and told him my name Butler, he thought I was taking the mickey,but it was true, anyway we were going to Hamburg later in the trip and were going through the swept channel, I was on the wheel and she was taking 2 spokes of starboard wheel and was going great, he, Butler the Mate called me out to look at the wake he said it looked like it was nailed down, straight as a die, It's funny how things can stay in your mind after all this time but it's nice to look back Tell
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  #155  
Old 27th June 2007, 07:58
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Memories

Tell,

Good memories, and memories are good. I checked out your profile and your comment made me smile.

Thankfully, the mind tends to remember the good times and those less pleasant memories get filed in a different part of the brain; this is very good, for then remember the flat calm water, the quiet and mug of tea at 5:30 in the morning as though it was only yesterday, but that other time, when it was Force 10 and driving rain, with the ship at rolling 23 degrees, one somehow just overlooks….

Being at ease with the wheel, and having her respond to that gentle touch every 30 seconds is something one does not forget.

Mark
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  #156  
Old 30th June 2007, 20:58
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saltyswamp saltyswamp is offline  
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Hi Martin.
I'm sure our paths must have crossed. I was on "Humboldt" from Aug 80 - April 82 with time of for leave you understand. Also:- Abadesa 62, Hardwicke Grange 63-65,Bidford Priory,Royston Grange,Joya McCance,Oremina,Ocean Transport,Cavendish,Tenbury,Cumbria,Furness Bridge(nearly 2 Years)Elstree Grange,Ironbridge,Manchester Challange,Abbey,Longbow(Guided Missile Test Barge) Then just about every Houlder related vessel & Rig in the North Sea. Worked in Aberdeen Office for a while and Personnel Dept. in Leadenhall Street.(commuted from Newcastle every week, enjoyed that!) Took early retirement in 99.
Regards
Hi Leo
Was on Humbolt sept80 to Dec 80 as 4/E and burnt the back of my hand Bo Bo was C/E and Burgess was Old Man and if I remember correctly you managed to get the price of the beer down considerebly which was appreciated all round
Regards Stuart(stew)
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  #157  
Old 1st July 2007, 13:48
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Life on the Humboldt

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Originally Posted by saltyswamp View Post
Hi Leo
Was on Humbolt sept80 to Dec 80 as 4/E and burnt the back of my hand Bo Bo was C/E and Burgess was Old Man and if I remember correctly you managed to get the price of the beer down considerebly which was appreciated all round
Regards Stuart(stew)
Hi Stew.
I remember that trip well and your accident. Bo Bo did not want to accept the report I filled in regarding your hand because as I seem to remember he was partially to blame. We had some good times on the old Humboldt. Cheap beer was always appreciated when we could get it. Where are you now and what are you up to?
Regards
Leo
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  #158  
Old 12th August 2007, 17:47
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Lieutenant-Commander 'Fairy' Filmer

Lieutenant-Commander 'Fairy' Filmer

From and Copyright of The Daily Telegraph -10/08/2007

The entire obituary may be found: here, but in précis ,and the reasons the details caught my eye:

Lieutenant-Commander "Fairy" Filmer, who has died aged 91, helped to sink a German cruiser in a dive-bombing attack; spent five years as a German prisoner-of-war; and later was a master of merchant ships in the South Seas.

Diving at 60 degrees from 12,000ft as part of a force of 16 Blackbird Skuas with 800 and 803 naval air squadrons on April 10 1940, he hit the German light cruiser Königsberg with a 500lb bomb, which was one of three which caught the ship in Bergen harbour, and sank her. It was, Filmer recalled, "the first time in the history of aviation that a major warship was sunk by air attack in wartime"; he was mentioned in dispatches for his daring and resource in the conduct of hazardous and successful operations.

Between April 12 and 26 Filmer flew five more sorties against German shipping and the Luftwaffe from Hatston in the Orkneys and the carrier Glorious. On the last of these he broke away from his flight of three Skuas to attack three Heinkel 111s, shooting down one but being caught by a burst of fire.

Blinded by spraying petrol and with his cockpit full of smoke, he ditched his aircraft in a fjord, but his torpedo air gunner, Petty Officer Ken Baldwin, was killed. Filmer was ever afterwards haunted by the thought that had he waited for his flight to follow, Baldwin might never have been killed.

With Norwegian help he salvaged his aircraft, and was evacuated to Tromsø in the cruiser Glasgow with King Haakon and the Norwegian gold reserves before taking a short period of survivor's leave and rejoining 803 squadron with a replacement aircraft.

His memory of meeting the Norwegian king made Filmer all the more determined when, on June 13, he was a section leader of 803, which flew from the carrier Ark Royal to make an ill-fated attack on German ships.
Cecil Howard Filmer, known as "Fairy", was born in South Africa in 1916, and in 1931 he joined the South African training ship General Botha. He was runner-up to the King's Gold Medallist for his term and appointed midshipman, RNR. After three years' apprenticeship with Houlder Brothers, a UK firm, he passed his 2nd mate's certificate and was sent to the destroyer Foresight.
Filmer spent five years as a prisoner of war, beginning in Dulag Luft, and delighted in making repeated escape attempts. Once he and five others jumped at night from a train travelling at about 25 mph, but were recaptured the next day. Another time he hid in the false bottom of a box filled with empty food tins and was carried out to a rubbish dump. While the guard was distracted, he slithered out and hid in a hut until darkness fell and walked away from the camp using the lights behind him as a navigation aid. After 10 days he reached the Danish border, where he was caught again.

He helped with the tunnel at Stalag Luft III for the Great Escape of April 1944, which led to 50 of the airmen who got away, including his Norwegian friend Halldor Espelid, being shot on Hitler's orders. After the war Filmer flew again with the Royal Navy but retired in 1958, returning to his first love, the merchant navy, and within 12 months he was master of a ship belonging to the King of Tonga.
Once, south of New Caledonia, his ship broke down, and being unwilling to be adrift in the hurricane season, Filmer made sails out of deck awnings and sailed 350 miles at four knots to a rendezvous with an Australian rescue tug. He continued for a further 16 years, based at Fiji, and sailing between Tahiti, Rarotonga, Honolulu and the Gilbert Islands, before retiring aged 69 to Durban.

"Fairy" Filmer, who died on July 15, never married. "Just as well," he said. "A wife would not have seen much of me over the years."
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  #159  
Old 12th August 2007, 18:29
K urgess K urgess is offline
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A very brave man and an interesting career.
I'm sure that the journalist from the Times was not an aviation expert or he would have picked the correct name for the aircraft.
The Skua was built by Blackburn Aircraft at Brough near Hull.

Kris

Last edited by K urgess; 12th August 2007 at 18:39..
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  #160  
Old 12th August 2007, 18:37
sailor63 sailor63 is offline  
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Originally Posted by Ian Norman View Post
Anyone around from Houlders, would be great to hear how you are doing.
Hi Ian, I sailed on the Royston Grange one trip to B.A. in 1963. as we all know she met a terrible end outside Monty in ,72 i think. cheers, colin.K. (sailor63).
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  #161  
Old 15th August 2007, 22:16
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Steve Armstrong

Hi Anybody know the were'abouts of steve armstrong (Scouse)
thanks
stuart
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  #162  
Old 17th August 2007, 22:00
glynn gerard hewitson glynn gerard hewitson is offline  
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ledbury and queensbury

hi everyone
im new to the forum .nice to have come across this site
on the web.
done two trips on the ledbury and two on the queensbury in 56 and 58
down to rio. santos. montevideo and b.a. as a galley boy and steward.
brilliant places.liverpool bar and new inn come to mind in b.a. also a.b.c.
bar in santos.loved having giant steak and chips for breakfast on way back
to ship after a night out.remember buying cowboy boots and leather jacket
in b.a.wish i was there now. well maybe one day.
anyone out there got any photos of these two ships.love to see them.
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  #163  
Old 1st September 2007, 08:06
non descript non descript is offline
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Welcome to you Glynn, there is a photograph of your Shaftsbury located here and the Ledbury has one shot here

Last edited by non descript; 1st September 2007 at 08:12..
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  #164  
Old 8th September 2007, 21:46
norsea norsea is offline  
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Hello Paul
I had the pleasure of serving with Mike as Assistant Bargemaster between 1973/75 on board Oregis. Please convey my regards to your Dad.I,like him, am still enjoying retirement (just had my 70th.but am quite happy so long as they keep coming round)
Best Wishes
Angus Davidson
p.s. Still have a photo of Mike and myself by No.2 lifeboat
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  #165  
Old 9th September 2007, 18:24
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dnobmal dnobmal is offline  
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i spent some time in Shetland in a village called Pundston and John Houlder owned or still owns a house about a quarter of a mile down the road from where I lived at the time.I visited his house once or twice and it seems he was very interested in bird-watching .About a year ago there was a contact on this site who lives in Shetland,sailed with Houlders as an engineer,he said that John Houlder still pilots himself up to Sumburgh in his plane but he cannot drive a car to where he stays. Do not know the reason why, medical probably yet he pilots a plane.Also in the same village was a former Bosun name of Andrew Barclay,who sailed with Houlders who I got to know quite well ,sorry to say I have heard he has passed away.
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  #166  
Old 9th September 2007, 18:39
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John Houlder’s general health is excellent for someone of 90 years of age, but his hearing is somewhat poor – this lack of hearing is no real drawback for flying, as he can just wear headphones and turn up the volume and fly with perfect safety – driving a car is a different matter and I have not seen him drive for years.
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  #167  
Old 10th September 2007, 16:42
JohnMac068 JohnMac068 is offline  
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Originally Posted by Tonga View Post
John Houlder’s general health is excellent for someone of 90 years of age, but his hearing is somewhat poor – this lack of hearing is no real drawback for flying, as he can just wear headphones and turn up the volume and fly with perfect safety – driving a car is a different matter and I have not seen him drive for years.
Last time I saw him drive, was after watching the tank tests for DSV Orelia, must have been 1981/82, at Teddington, he drove a mini in those days, he took myself and Dive Superintendent Gunter Straub back into London, we were glad to get out, at the nearest Tube station ! His problem with driving, was that he had difficulty changing gear with his left arm, which had been injured during the war. I did suggest that an automatic would suit him better, but his philosophy was to have the cheapest vehicle possible, not leave anything inside it and don't lock the doors, then it would not get broken into or stolen !!!
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  #168  
Old 14th September 2007, 16:03
John Lord John Lord is offline  
 
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Hi Ian,I served my apprenticeship in Furness Houlders.1946 to 1949. Served on Princesa and then on Argentine Transport.Rgds John Lord (R350523)
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  #169  
Old 14th September 2007, 23:41
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John, firstly a warm welcome to you. Thank you for joining the community; enjoy the site and all it has to offer, and we very much look forward to your postings. You will hopefully find a wealth of Houlders stuff on here, as well as a wealth of other and equally useful things.

The mention of the dreaded phrase Furness-Houlder ( a name to strike dread into the heart of any Maltese Cross person ) sent a shiver up my spine , but I can see your point, for the first ship you mention, Princesa, was owned by a company called Furness-Houlder Argentine Lines Ltd., and the Argentine Transport was owned by Empire Transport Company Ltd. Thankfully they were both managed by Houlder Brothers. Of the two ships, the former was built for Houlders and remained in the fleet from 1918 until 1949 when she was scrapped; the latter was built in 1944 as the Samtyne, aquired by Houlders in 1947 and sold in 1958 – re-named Archandros, sold again in 1967 and re-named Zephyr and scrapped in 1968.
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  #170  
Old 19th September 2007, 22:35
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I sailed with Nobby Clark from Aberdeen on the Corato from March 56 to January 57.
He was third then second mate. The original second mate was George Sutcliffe.
Master was R.J,.Stephens, the mate Frank Richards (paid off sick in Columbo), that's why everyone moved up one spot.
The senior apprentice was Derek Barnd and he moved up to third mate.
Hope this info adds to yuor search.

Regards John
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  #171  
Old 19th September 2007, 22:37
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Andy Barclay was lamptrimmer on the Duquesa in 58 when I was there.
Hav no idea what happened to him after that.

Regards john
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  #172  
Old 19th September 2007, 22:42
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jgazzard jgazzard is offline  
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Did two trips in the Langton in 56.
Master for the first trip was Charlie Belton (the Duke of Wimbledon) and the second was Roy Faulkner who was the regular master of the ship.
Mate was George Sutcliffe and the second Mate Pete Charman.

Regards John
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  #173  
Old 19th September 2007, 22:49
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Originally Posted by jgazzard View Post
Did two trips in the Langton in 56.
Master for the first trip was Charlie Belton (the Duke of Wimbledon) and the second was Roy Faulkner who was the regular master of the ship.
Mate was George Sutcliffe and the second Mate Pete Charman.

Regards John
John

Charlie Belton was certainly unique, he also had a most charming wife who appears to have been the butt of endless jokes, but by all accounts took them in good part.

I had not realised that he came from that heart of the Maritime World, Wimbledon. - I believe that one of his many brothers was a Captain with Sun Tugs

Regards Mark
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  #174  
Old 19th September 2007, 23:30
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Monket I also joined the Condesa in Bordeaux in March 62.
The full story of that eprisode was that she was due to be scrapped and had one final cargo of oranges from South Africa. Some of these were discharged in France where she was inspected by some blokes and chartered on a monthly rate to sit in Bordeaux storing some 4000 tons of cow beef.
The reason for this was that the refrigerated storage at a big American transit base in Biordeaux was being expanded so they needed the meat out of the way while they did this work. The anticipated time for this job was 3 months.
For some reason, they did the job but did not put the meat back into storage but kept it in Condesa for 22 months.
Finally, the cargo was sold to the Spanish government and delivered to Valencia, Alicante, Cadiz and Santander. then we went to Gibraltar where excess fuel was discharged and then on to Spezia where she was to be scrapped.
The master for this trip was Denis Parkin and the mate Norman Trevethan. I was second mate. I am having a blonde moment as I cannot remember who else sailed on that trip.
Many of the crew were shipped home by rail from Santander and a small number of us finished the trip to Spezia and then flew home.

Regards John
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  #175  
Old 19th September 2007, 23:43
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The Butler you speak of may have been a character who, for years, was relieving mate on the meat ships when they came into London in the 50's.
He had a voice like a foghorn but knew every rivet of those shios.
He had been mate on the Rippingham Grange during the second world war however he never went beyond mate as, rumour has it that he beat up an examiner during orals when they got into a dispute about something or other. I have no idea whether this is true or not but, given his personality, it may well be.

Regards John
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