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The worst engineer I encountered

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  #51  
Old 14th February 2018, 22:02
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septiclecky septiclecky is offline  
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A 1st Engineer in P&O Cruises when the engineers panic alarm went off, we all piled down to the engine room met by one of the on watch engineers informed us the a fuel pipe had burst in the boiler room, so a group of us shot of to the engine room fire locker to don BA sets, fire suits etc. We returned to the engine room to be met by this pillock shouting what the hell are you doing dressed like that etc only to be followed by the Chief congratulating us on what we had done without being told. The man was a ***** in the first class and no engineer/electrican had any respect fo the idiot.
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  #52  
Old 18th March 2018, 15:07
jep1916 jep1916 is offline  
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Open up a Scotch Boiler for survey. All went well and we closed the boiler up and started to warm through. A J/E was on the night watch and I told him to check the strong backs on the upper access doors and to tighten up the strong back nut every half hour. He woke me up at 5am to tell me that nothing was happening when he carried out his instructions. I went down below with him to find that he taken the strong back nuts off and he was then using a sledge hammer to knock the access doors in. I nearly had a heart attack on the spot.
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  #53  
Old 13th April 2018, 10:33
oldgoat1947 oldgoat1947 is offline  
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As a Supt Engineer I had a Call from a Chief Engineer who regretfully informed me they had a Wrecked Diesel Generator on board. Investigation revealed that the PM had called for a L.O. Change, and Crankcase Inspection. The Third Engineer had drained the Sump and he had removed the crankcase doors and carried out the Inspection, and replaced the crankcase doors.. He had Correctly Isolated the D/G and posted Notices.
He went up for his coffee break , and was talking to the C/E. The wheel house had called the ER and advised the duty Engineer that one hours notice of M.E. The duty Engineer called the C/E and advised him. The C/E said OK the Third and I will be down shortly. Instead of waiting for the C/E and Third Eng. The Duty Eng opened up the Starting Air, and Blew the Engine over on Air. Shut The Indicator Cocks and attempted to start the Engine. The engine tripped Low Oil Press (None) He reset the trip and tried again this time locally on manual control overriding the Governors and safety devices. The C/E and Third Engineer arrived in the ER because of the high No of alarms. The Duty Engineer had not even checked the oil dipstick prior to running up the Engine. Nor had he operated the hand priming pump to pre lube the bearings. This happened about 6 years ago. He is now currently a Supt Eng. for another Company. No names but they are still among us and we have to survive. Some say experience is proportional to the trail of damage left behind.
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  #54  
Old 26th August 2018, 13:13
Ian860B Ian860B is offline  
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Can't really blame an Engineer for this one, as a Junior Engineer on the SS Oronsay not long out of her last Dry Docking in Southhampton, only one boiler on line being looked after by a Vospers shore side fireman. Coming on watch and receiving a handover I went through to the boiler room to check everything was OK, The boilers were Foster Wheeler Controlled Superheat with twin furnaces one Saturated steam one Superheat. To control the boiler pressure a fire was withdrawn untill the pressure dropped enough for the fire to be put back in, there was two burners in use in each furnace so not really a problem. However the fireman was taking a burner out of the saturated furnace and leaving full firing in the superheat furnace,The normal steam temperature in port was 750 deg F when I looked at the steam temperature gauge it was over 1000 deg F ,I quietly told the fireman to change to using the superheat burner to control pressure , after about half an hour the temperature was down to 700-750 deg F. I guess he had not been instructed correctly.
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  #55  
Old 2nd September 2018, 15:14
Peter Short Peter Short is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jep1916 View Post
Open up a Scotch Boiler for survey. All went well and we closed the boiler up and started to warm through. A J/E was on the night watch and I told him to check the strong backs on the upper access doors and to tighten up the strong back nut every half hour. He woke me up at 5am to tell me that nothing was happening when he carried out his instructions. I went down below with him to find that he taken the strong back nuts off and he was then using a sledge hammer to knock the access doors in. I nearly had a heart attack on the spot.
jep,

That is one of the most appalling stories I have read here - how could an engineer be so ignorant? Before going to sea here your would have completed an apprenticeship and studied for a Third Marine certificate which thoroughly covers Scotch boilers, including precautions to take with doors. It boggles the mind and terrifies the reader and I wonder how such an ignorant man would be given care of the boiler. 45-odd tons of water in those boilers...
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  #56  
Old 6th September 2018, 17:36
JohnBP JohnBP is offline  
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This is about the worst engineer I encountered not because he was incompetent but because he was cruel to myself and another cadet. His name was Dxxxd Best, 3rd Eng on the Br. Crusader. there were 2 Eng cadets, myself and another. he made our lives a misery when on watch with him, doing port watches and even ashore. It got so bad we started a "Death to Best", or DTB club... put DTB on the ER clock, in his locker, on the separators etc. He would do his washing once a week, we would remove one of his underwear from the washing machine and throw it overboard. On one occasion while working an a stripped down generator, he grabbed me put my head between his legs and roughed my ears, one started bleeding. Anyway he could not understand why his washing was disappearing. We complained to the 2nd, but nothing was done. Final trick was when he paid off, we put a generator piston gudgon pin in his luggage must have weighed 20 LB... *****... I vowed if I ever met him again I would continue the DTB club.....
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  #57  
Old 6th September 2018, 21:51
stevekelly10 stevekelly10 is offline  
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Originally Posted by JohnBP View Post
This is about the worst engineer I encountered not because he was incompetent but because he was cruel to myself and another cadet. His name was Dxxxd Best, 3rd Eng on the Br. Crusader. there were 2 Eng cadets, myself and another. he made our lives a misery when on watch with him, doing port watches and even ashore. It got so bad we started a "Death to Best", or DTB club... put DTB on the ER clock, in his locker, on the separators etc. He would do his washing once a week, we would remove one of his underwear from the washing machine and throw it overboard. On one occasion while working an a stripped down generator, he grabbed me put my head between his legs and roughed my ears, one started bleeding. Anyway he could not understand why his washing was disappearing. We complained to the 2nd, but nothing was done. Final trick was when he paid off, we put a generator piston gudgon pin in his luggage must have weighed 20 LB... *****... I vowed if I ever met him again I would continue the DTB club.....
Strangely enough the worst engineer I sailed with, was a 2/E with the last name Love ! It was on the British Judge and I was first trip J/E. He hated cadets and Long hair, so I was doomed But I was not alone in hating him ! One morning he came down to the engineroom workshop, to find his battledress jacket hanging from a rope noose over a pipe ! I immediately got the blame ! But I got off with it, as I said if I had done it, He would have been wearing it at the time !
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  #58  
Old 7th September 2018, 06:08
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Final trick was when he paid off, we put a generator piston gudgon pin in his luggage must have weighed 20 LB... *****... I vowed if I ever met him again I would continue the DTB club.....
I once heard of a J/E, (having been given a dogs life the whole trip), Who cut out the profile of a gun out of shim stock, slipped it under the lining of the 2/E's holdall, when said 2/E was paying-off the ship and was on his way to the airport to fly home ...
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  #59  
Old 7th September 2018, 21:56
oldgoat1947 oldgoat1947 is offline  
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Re shim stock gun

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Originally Posted by D1566 View Post
I once heard of a J/E, (having been given a dogs life the whole trip), Who cut out the profile of a gun out of shim stock, slipped it under the lining of the 2/E's holdall, when said 2/E was paying-off the ship and was on his way to the airport to fly home ...
We had an Engineer who was a real pain in the butt, The Capt asked him to take some mail home and in the mail was a tinfoil cut out of a pistol. He got a full bodt search at Miami Air port Karma can be a *****.
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  #60  
Old 21st September 2018, 11:42
jep1916 jep1916 is offline  
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Originally Posted by Peter Short View Post
jep,

That is one of the most appalling stories I have read here - how could an engineer be so ignorant? Before going to sea here your would have completed an apprenticeship and studied for a Third Marine certificate which thoroughly covers Scotch boilers, including precautions to take with doors. It boggles the mind and terrifies the reader and I wonder how such an ignorant man would be given care of the boiler. 45-odd tons of water in those boilers...
This incident happened in the early 70's. As I recall theJ/E had served his time ashore as a toolmaker.
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  #61  
Old 26th September 2018, 16:27
Ian Coupe Ian Coupe is offline
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Ignorance is bliss.

Many years ago as a junior and then as fourth I sailed with a 2E who was not only a drunk but also totally incompetent, I sailed with this idiot on three separate ships, and was unlucky enough to get him as the 2E on my first trip as 4th, the ship was a clapped out old Tanker and for some reason the Chief was protecting this idiot. I was paid off sick went back to JE for a few months on another Tanker before going back up to 4th, when who should arrive but this idiot, fortunately we had a different Chief who had sailed with him before and hated the sight of him.
I have never forgotten him, but in some ways he formulated my attitude as 2E and then as Chief, I would hope for the better.
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  #62  
Old 26th September 2018, 19:37
ChathamChavs ChathamChavs is offline  
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I had the pleasure to sail with a Chief Engineer who was rat-arsed 24/7 , but was adored and revered by his fellow countrymen .On this ship we had a portable air compressor like the one used for road repairs etc which was used for deck chipping machines . It kept cutting out on overheat . After checking it out with 2/E we concluded the compressor was knackered . From the bar , the Chief Engineer decreed that the overheat switch was faulty and I was ordered to short it out . The 2/E shrugged his shoulders and said do it , even though we both were not comfortable with this . Later that day we heard a huge BANG ..... my wife was on board and still chuckles about this !!
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  #63  
Old 6th October 2018, 13:37
Ian Coupe Ian Coupe is offline
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This horror story reminds of a 2E I sailed with.
We were working on the scavenger pumps of an LBD; before crawling inside the pump the 2E produced a large chunk of timber which fitted neatly inside the pump between the casing and piston, he then removed the fuses from the turning gear motor and kept them with him; I queried this and he told me that on a previous ship when he was inside a scavenge pump a Junior thought it a good joke to give the turning gear a kick, the second said he had never exited a small space at such speed, what he did to offending junior I never found out, but expect it included the administering of some personal violence.
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  #64  
Old 9th October 2018, 21:46
henry1 henry1 is offline
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A 3/E I sailed with who had been a dispensation 2/E on a sister ship, we had an Aux boiler in the middles we had opened for survey then boxed up, wanting it warmed I told the 3/E to flash it for 5 minutes while I was doing the scavenge inspection, all was set up. half way along the scavenge I heard a loud bang. got out and asked what happened, the 3/E said he flashed it and there was a loud bang so I said do what you did again I want to see what happened, there was a loud bang and the cover over the igniters blew off, I then asked had the 3/E touched anything, he replied he had tried a few times and when nothing happened the electrician came past and said "is everything open" and found the solenoid bypass valves closed as they should be but he opened them so the fuel pump drive was connected to the FD fan shaft so during the purge the fuel was pumping into the furnace.
The 3/E could not understand why I shouted at him
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  #65  
Old 19th October 2018, 21:57
Ian Coupe Ian Coupe is offline
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Boilers, a disaster waiting to happen.

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Originally Posted by jep1916 View Post
Open up a Scotch Boiler for survey. All went well and we closed the boiler up and started to warm through. A J/E was on the night watch and I told him to check the strong backs on the upper access doors and to tighten up the strong back nut every half hour. He woke me up at 5am to tell me that nothing was happening when he carried out his instructions. I went down below with him to find that he taken the strong back nuts off and he was then using a sledge hammer to knock the access doors in. I nearly had a heart attack on the spot.
There is always one, but hopefully they learn, I was 4th on an old Motor Tanker, 2 Scotch Boilers in the aft of the ER, I came down one morning to find just the fiver on watch, he said he could not get water into the port boiler, the gauge glass looked empty? I cross blew the gauge glass, the boiler was full, right out of the top of the glass, I was not amused, and fortunately the boiler did not prime, The fiver should have known better, but the second was a lazy ****!
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  #66  
Old 29th November 2018, 16:52
Willie Bryson Willie Bryson is offline
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the worst engineer i sailed with was a deck engineer with a chiefs ticket who came running to me claiming there was something wrong with donkey boiler as there was no steam for inert gas plant. they had to stop discharging due to this. i duly went down and checked boiler it had just a small amount in sight glass and burner had locked out on low water. i told deck engineer whose fix it , i said i couldn't as ship had 10 degree list and that was the problem . he still insisted that i fix it. i told i will when list is corrected and went back to bar for a few drinks.
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  #67  
Old 14th March 2019, 03:37
Edwmic Edwmic is offline  
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did he perform a quick or slow drain test?
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  #68  
Old 17th March 2019, 16:39
sternchallis sternchallis is offline
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Originally Posted by jim garnett View Post
The worst engineer
On arriving in engine room at start of watch I was informed by third engineer that he had not had been able to get any water in the gauge of the auxiliary boiler but it seemed alright as the pressure had not dropped !!!
Jim Garnett.
And as the BOT Examiner asks, " What steps do take"?

The ER steps, Sir, f***** big ones!!!
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  #69  
Old 6th April 2019, 17:41
Philthechill Philthechill is offline  
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Thumbs down We, 'Atlantic Causeway' were scheduled----

-----to call-in at Liverpool to drop-off some 'Urgent' containers which should have been dropped-off by another ACL ship which had suffered a break-down and couldn't take them so we had got the job. So, because we were going to 'do' Liverpool, Gothenburg, Liverpool, several of us had got permission for our wives to join us at Liverpool for the short trips.

We arrived for the Pilot but it was blowing a hooley so we were told to drop the hook off Anglesey.

I was in the Engineers Mess having a bite with 2/E Tony Dick who had left the 'Fiver' in the Control Room with strict instructions to give Tony a shout if we were told we were "going in".

Next thing was we felt heavy vibrations which we knew meant both screws were rotating and meant we were under-way.

"Stupid little t**t!", said Tony, "I told Taff to send the greaser up at Standby", as he made a dash for the door.

I raced after him and, bursting into the Control Room, found Taff looking through some t*t-book he got from somewhere.

BOTH screws were turning at revs for around "Slow Ahead", BOTH boilers were losing pressure with the distinct possibility of the turbo-alternator cutting-out!!!

Tony and I swung into action, he attending to the run-away engines and me getting more burners into action----and STILL the stupid little t**t was sitting in the Control Room chair!!!

Tony got the engines stopped and contacted the bridge to be told we'd dragged the anchor and broken the cable which meant we only had the one anchor.

Contact was made with Liverpool Pilot who said they couldn't take us into Seaforth with just the one anchor so we had to go direct to Gothenburg.

This meant, of course, the wives who were waiting to join the ship for their trip to G'burg had to go home.

So why had the engines fired-up by themselves?

Those highly-automated ships had "Auto-blast" as part of the "Engine Controls".

After everything had been readied for going to sea you selected "Auto Blast" and that system would give a short blast of steam to the turbines to make sure they were kept nicely warmed-through then the "Ahead" valve would close. Two minutes later the "Astern" signal operated etc.etc.

However the automation could go awry, (as happened!), and "things could happen", which was how we lost our anchor!!!

Thing is that stupid t**t, supposedly 'on watch', hadn't felt the vibration of the twin screws to alert him things were not right.

As you can imagine he was as popular as a dose of c***s as our wives had missed their 'jolly' to Gothenburg and back.

The 'fiver'? He WAS paying-off, going on leave and 're-joining' but he was never seen again. Phil

Last edited by Philthechill; 6th April 2019 at 17:46..
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  #70  
Old 6th April 2019, 21:51
sternchallis sternchallis is offline
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Re: Post 69.

Not being a steam man, would you on a non automated ship supply steam to the turbine(s) in the Ahead and Astern direction every so often to keep them warmed through if on 30 minutes notice or less, but manually on the manouvring valves.
I have seen a steam recip warmed through prior to starting by adding a bit of steam then operating the reversing engine, so it got all the piston and slide valves moving plus all the linkages. (No I am not that old, served my time repairing trawlers of which steam was 50% of them).

I seem to remember seeing something on a motorship I think for blowing through on air or turning slow ahead for a short time, but never actually seen it used as we would use the sticks in the ECR manually for a blow through.

One of our Chiefs was known for tweaking automated gear with a long thin screwdriver. He did it to a Lyngso Bridge control system and they had to get one of their people out to reset it.

The company was told by Lyngso, if they had to come out again to do a similar reset then they would be charged. This was on a new ship.
Think they put the Chief on older ships without automation. Think he was trying to reduce the amount of starting air used.

He also had a go with the Reefer controls, but the Freezer saw him disapearing up a ladder when he came down to answer a fridge alarm. flagrante delicto
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  #71  
Old 6th April 2019, 23:01
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Originally Posted by Philthechill View Post
-----to call-in at Liverpool to drop-off some 'Urgent' containers which should have been dropped-off by another ACL ship which had suffered a break-down and couldn't take them so we had got the job. So, because we were going to 'do' Liverpool, Gothenburg, Liverpool, several of us had got permission for our wives to join us at Liverpool for the short trips.

We arrived for the Pilot but it was blowing a hooley so we were told to drop the hook off Anglesey.

I was in the Engineers Mess having a bite with 2/E Tony Dick who had left the 'Fiver' in the Control Room with strict instructions to give Tony a shout if we were told we were "going in".

Next thing was we felt heavy vibrations which we knew meant both screws were rotating and meant we were under-way.

"Stupid little t**t!", said Tony, "I told Taff to send the greaser up at Standby", as he made a dash for the door.

I raced after him and, bursting into the Control Room, found Taff looking through some t*t-book he got from somewhere.

BOTH screws were turning at revs for around "Slow Ahead", BOTH boilers were losing pressure with the distinct possibility of the turbo-alternator cutting-out!!!

Tony and I swung into action, he attending to the run-away engines and me getting more burners into action----and STILL the stupid little t**t was sitting in the Control Room chair!!!

Tony got the engines stopped and contacted the bridge to be told we'd dragged the anchor and broken the cable which meant we only had the one anchor.

Contact was made with Liverpool Pilot who said they couldn't take us into Seaforth with just the one anchor so we had to go direct to Gothenburg.

This meant, of course, the wives who were waiting to join the ship for their trip to G'burg had to go home.

So why had the engines fired-up by themselves?

Those highly-automated ships had "Auto-blast" as part of the "Engine Controls".

After everything had been readied for going to sea you selected "Auto Blast" and that system would give a short blast of steam to the turbines to make sure they were kept nicely warmed-through then the "Ahead" valve would close. Two minutes later the "Astern" signal operated etc.etc.

However the automation could go awry, (as happened!), and "things could happen", which was how we lost our anchor!!!

Thing is that stupid t**t, supposedly 'on watch', hadn't felt the vibration of the twin screws to alert him things were not right.

As you can imagine he was as popular as a dose of c***s as our wives had missed their 'jolly' to Gothenburg and back.

The 'fiver'? He WAS paying-off, going on leave and 're-joining' but he was never seen againething and . Phil
That's interesting, Phil. I was once on watch on Causeway loading cars alongside in Gothenburg. I visited the control room something and during a chat with the engineer on watch the Auto Blast system kicked in but kept increasing the revs and the ship started vibrating. Leaving the engineer to resolve the issue I ran out on to the main deck expecting to see mayhem with parted mooring wires and cars in the dock. To my relief all was normal and the ship had remained in position, being held by the tension winches! Thankfully, we were soon back to normal and it never happened to me again.

Howard
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  #72  
Old 7th April 2019, 01:05
dannic dannic is offline  
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Originally Posted by Philthechill View Post
-----to call-in at Liverpool to drop-off some 'Urgent' containers which should have been dropped-off by another ACL ship which had suffered a break-down and couldn't take them so we had got the job. So, because we were going to 'do' Liverpool, Gothenburg, Liverpool, several of us had got permission for our wives to join us at Liverpool for the short trips.

We arrived for the Pilot but it was blowing a hooley so we were told to drop the hook off Anglesey.

I was in the Engineers Mess having a bite with 2/E Tony Dick who had left the 'Fiver' in the Control Room with strict instructions to give Tony a shout if we were told we were "going in".

Next thing was we felt heavy vibrations which we knew meant both screws were rotating and meant we were under-way.

"Stupid little t**t!", said Tony, "I told Taff to send the greaser up at Standby", as he made a dash for the door.

I raced after him and, bursting into the Control Room, found Taff looking through some t*t-book he got from somewhere.

BOTH screws were turning at revs for around "Slow Ahead", BOTH boilers were losing pressure with the distinct possibility of the turbo-alternator cutting-out!!!

Tony and I swung into action, he attending to the run-away engines and me getting more burners into action----and STILL the stupid little t**t was sitting in the Control Room chair!!!

Tony got the engines stopped and contacted the bridge to be told we'd dragged the anchor and broken the cable which meant we only had the one anchor.

Contact was made with Liverpool Pilot who said they couldn't take us into Seaforth with just the one anchor so we had to go direct to Gothenburg.

This meant, of course, the wives who were waiting to join the ship for their trip to G'burg had to go home.

So why had the engines fired-up by themselves?

Those highly-automated ships had "Auto-blast" as part of the "Engine Controls".

After everything had been readied for going to sea you selected "Auto Blast" and that system would give a short blast of steam to the turbines to make sure they were kept nicely warmed-through then the "Ahead" valve would close. Two minutes later the "Astern" signal operated etc.etc.

However the automation could go awry, (as happened!), and "things could happen", which was how we lost our anchor!!!

Thing is that stupid t**t, supposedly 'on watch', hadn't felt the vibration of the twin screws to alert him things were not right.

As you can imagine he was as popular as a dose of c***s as our wives had missed their 'jolly' to Gothenburg and back.

The 'fiver'? He WAS paying-off, going on leave and 're-joining' but he was never seen again. Phil
Well that explains why auto blast wasnt used when i was on Conveyor!!
I did ask and told it no longer worked,
Dannic
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  #73  
Old 7th April 2019, 10:45
Philthechill Philthechill is offline  
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Exclamation ANOTHER blast, (no pun intended!),----

----from the past re, "Causeway".

We were alongside in Seaforth when the designer of the automation system, (a guy called Rutherford), was showing some of his pals round the Control Room.

Putting alternators 'on-line' was, supposedly, just the press of a button on the switchboard. This would "crack" the outlet valve on the incoming alternator to warm-through the turbine then, after the 'programmed' time the valve would open fully and the inlet would then open. Away would go the turbine and, when it was up-to-speed, it would 'put' itself 'on-line'.

However, like much of the automation, the 'idea' was nothing like the reality!

I was down-below with CE Ken McKenzie and I heard the 'click, click, click of the 'pecker-valve' followed shortly after by shouts of "Phil!, Phil!, quick, over here!!".

I rushed-over to the alternators where I knew the shouts were coming-from and found 'Ken' hanging onto the RUNNING alternator outlet valve which was, despite the weight of 'Ken' hanging onto it, 'clicking' shut!

Not having time to get to the bank of isolating-valves I took my ever-present 'shifter' out of the back-pocket of my boiler-suit and bashed the air-line flat thus cutting-off the air-supply to the valve.

I don't remember what was done to make sure this COULDN'T happen again---probably just removing the printed-circuit 'cards' from inside the panel.

Then there was the time one of the Weir TWL main-boiler feed-pumps blew-up------but that's another yarn!!! Phil

Last edited by Philthechill; 8th April 2019 at 06:51..
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  #74  
Old 7th April 2019, 12:18
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Not having time to get to the bank of isolating-valves I took my ever-present 'shifter' out of the back-pocket of my boiler-suit and bashed the air-line flat thus cutting-off the air-supply to the valve.
Bally heck! Thinking on your feet. Imminent disaster DOES tend to concentrate the mind
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  #75  
Old 8th April 2019, 06:45
Philthechill Philthechill is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Basil View Post
Bally heck! Thinking on your feet. Imminent disaster DOES tend to concentrate the mind
---part of your anatomy in fraught circumstances, Basil, goes "half-crown/sixpence" in rapid succession 'til you've got over the initial "shock" which was usually caused by the strident alarm-bell ringing in the Engineers alleyway, (inevitably at "stupid-o'clock" on the early-morning 12-4), as the Engineer on-watch has been presented with a sudden "situation" he can't handle by himself. Luckily that part of your anatomy didn't stay in the half-crown position long-enough for an "emptying" to happen!! Phil

Last edited by Philthechill; 8th April 2019 at 06:52..
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