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  #51  
Old 8th December 2007, 20:36
lakercapt lakercapt is offline  
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Good shots of Nauru David.
Looks a lot greener than I remember and I did not see the buoys at the loading cantilevers.
A place I would definitely put on my places not to go to on a world cruise.
See earlier posting
Bill R
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  #52  
Old 8th July 2008, 11:01
Mc OZ Mc OZ is offline
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Re Nauru shipping . My Father worked there after Japs bombed the place Re building the cantiiever. Mum and Dad were married there . The ships that serviced the Phosphate run were the TRIONA TRIADIC TRI-ELLIS owened by the British Phosphate commission Mark T.
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  #53  
Old 29th January 2009, 01:52
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More on Nauru stamp issue - '150 years of Lloyd's List' (1984)

'150 years of Lloyd's List' - from the presentation pack (1984)


250th ANNIVERSARY OF LLOYDS LIST


Over the last few centuries LLOYD'S have become a unique institution, and in every country in the world this name is synonymous with insurance and shipping.

The name 'Lloyd's' is derived from the enterprise of Edward Lloyd, who kept a Coffee House in the City of London in the 17th century. A practice arose for Marine Underwriters to resort to his Coffee House to transact their business. Edward Lloyd started his Coffee House in Great Tower Street about 1688, and moved it to Abchurch Lane in 1692. Underwriters would sit there to do business, and merchants or brokers who desired to effect insurances would go there to deal with them. Any policy so effected was, of course, a contract made with the Underwriters who signed it, and Edward Lloyd, who was merely landlord of the Coffee House, was no party to any such contract. Every policy was in the form which is still used, by which Lloyd's Underwriters sign it - 'each one for his own part, etc'. Besides keeping the Coffee House, Edward Lloyd in 1696 started a newspaper of shipping and other intelligence which was of service to his customers in providing them with information. But his main function was to provide a room in which they could do business, which took the place of an 'Exchange' or 'Bourse' as a place of meeting.

Later on, after the death of Edward Lloyd, it was found convenient for Marine Underwriters to have a similar place of business, and in 1770 the 'Society of Lloyd's; as a voluntary association, provided Rooms for its members in Pope's Head Alley. Still later this society moved to rooms in the Royal Exchange, where it remained till 1928, when it moved to its own building in Leadenhall Street. The Society, which until 1871 had been a sort of private club with a committee of management, was then incorporated by an Act of Parliament as the Corporation of Lloyd's. The Act opens with a recital that 'there has long existed in the City of London an Establishment or Society formerly held at Lloyd's Coffee House . . .'

The functions of Lloyd's, as a Corporation, are similar, though on an enormously increased scale, to those of the Coffee House from which it derives its name. Rooms are provided where Members may transact their business and the Corporation publishes daily 'Lloyd's List', which was established in 1734 and is, with the exception of the 'London Gazette', the oldest newspaper in the United Kingdom.

It is and was inevitable that an Island dependent entirely for its very existence on the export of phosphate (and for imports to sustain this industry and foodstuffs for the Nauruan population) that the Nauru Pacific Line shipping should be intricately bound to the Lloyd's operation, and as such shortly after the post independence period the Nauru Phosphate Corporation was appointed Agent of Lloyd's on Nauru Island.

Over a period of 78 years dating from the arrival of the first steamship 'SS Inger' (for the purpose of laying the first moorings) until now, Nauru has been fortunate with its shipping operations. At no time has a tragedy been experienced, apart from the first three ships to visit the Island during the period 1906/1909, these vessels being the 'Inger', Fido' and the 'Ocean Queen', excluding abnormal activities when the 'Triadic' was sunk by enemy action during the Second World War in 1940.This extraordinary record bears testimony to the skill of the many captains who have over the years moored their vessels on the treacherous reef surrounding the Island. Given in stamp value sequence, technical details in respect of the four vessels depicted in this series are as follows:


20c SS OCEAN QUEEN.
Completed in February 1909by W Gray & Co Ltd, West Hartlepool, for Jacob Christensen of Bergen, as a spar deck steamer of 3188gt being wrecked at Makatea on the 16th September 1909 whilst nearing the end of a ballast passage from Papeete to Makatea. Two interesting features relating to the 'OCEAN QUEEN'
1. The fact that the owner was in 1909 actually Lloyd's agent at Bergen - Mr Christensen's company (who still hold the appointment)
2.The vessel, being fitted with mooring gear, was to signal a new era in the laying of the moorings, but met with disaster when the mooring gear was actually carried away in addition to the fact that the vessel was wrecked as described above.


25c MV ENNA G.
Built in 1961, of 9423gt and carrying 125 passengers, this vessel was initially registered the 'PRINSIES MARGRIET` of the Oranje Lijn (Maatschappij Zeetransport) N.V., Rotterdam, serving the North Atlantic to Canada and the Great Lakes. The Oranje Lijn was jointly owned by two Dutch companies, N.A.S.M. and K.P.M., and in 1964 ownership was transferred to Nederlandsch-Amerikaansche Stoomvaart Maatschappij N.V., Rotterdam, prior to purchase by the Government of Nauru, and renamed 'ENNA G'.



30c PHOSPHATE LOADING.
Dating from the early days of phosphate extraction and production, engineers engaged in the industry had visions of a mechanical loading appliance which would permit loading of phosphate direct to a vessel's holds, thus dispensing with the relatively slow, laborious and expensive operation of lightering. This dream was realised on Nauru with the completion of Cantilever No. 1 in September 1930 which permitted a rate of loading of 1,000 tonnes per hour. Designed by the Corporation's Consulting Engineers with the Nauru Engineer and his Executive staff, the installation was completed by a Manchester Company of Civil Engineers and at the time of commissioning was given worldwide publicity in the Professional Press as 'A miracle of Engineering in the Central Pacific’. Following the success of Cantilever No.1, a second Cantilever (featured on the 30c stamp) with a greater loading capacity (1,500 tonnes per hour) was designed and built in Australia and commissioned in 1961.



40c MV TRIADIC.
The fourth functional ship built for the British Phosphate Commissioners, 'TRIADIC' was a motorship of 6378gt. On December 6-7, 1940 enemy raiders 'ORION' and 'KOMET', accompanied by the supply ship 'KULMERLAND', attacked shipping drifting off Nauru Island resulting in the loss of three ships of the four owned by the Commissioners. 'ORION' was responsible for sinking the 'TRIONA', 'TRIASTER' and 'TRIADIC' (motorships built in 1931,1935 and 1938) whilst the 'KOMET' sank two charter ships being the Union Steamship Co's KOMATA (built in 1938, 3900gt) and the Norwegian ‘VINNI' (motorship built in 1937, 5181gt).

The Nauru appointment as Agent of Lloyd's must surely rank as being the most distant point of operation of all Agencies under this global Corporation.


The basic layout of the stamps was designed by Mr Leslie Curtis of Great Bookham, England. The central illustrations for the stamps, plus the Official First Day cover and this Presentation Pack were designed by Mr Beverley Barnard of Brighton, England. Although Mr Barnard is a well known Marine Artist (being the President of the SCMA Assoc), this set of stamps is the first he has designed for Nauru. The stamps were printed by lithography in 5 colours, by The House of Questa, in sheets of 50 stamps, on CA Spiral Watermarked paper. The stamp size is 30.56 x 38.00 mm (vertical format), and the release date is 23 May, 1984.
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File Type: jpg NauruLloydsList.jpg (121.5 KB, 55 views)
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  #54  
Old 30th January 2009, 02:12
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Jan , having been an old 'UNION AUCKLAND', man I have enjoyed this story on Nauru Line as my immediate superior ( a Yorkie) Martin Moore was a deck officer with them as was a couple of other Kiwi people i no Nick Batterby and a Chief Steward called 'Flannel Foot'.

keep up the history it is great

Butters
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  #55  
Old 31st January 2009, 06:02
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Jan Hendrik Jan Hendrik is offline  
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David,
Thanks for this interesting summary.
Quite an extraordinary company but the people in the office (Nauru House) were so nice, very cooperative, yet the ships and their crew had to persevere a lot on account of late payments so they could not leave ports
and just do in which they excelled i.e. loading ships and taking them from A to B.

Butters,
Thanks

Jan
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  #56  
Old 31st January 2009, 15:54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobw View Post
In the early 1970's Nauru Pacific Line was looking to acquire another vessel which they were going to name "Cenpacrounder" as it was only to do the rounds of the Pacific Islands. She was to be purchased from Palm Line if I remember correctly.
This was at the time they were building the Kolle D.
Does anyone know the history of Cenpacrounder?

BobW
It is nearly two years since BobW’s query above regarding Nauru Pacific Line’s MV “Cenpac Rounder” but I may be able to fill in a few gaps as I served, many years ago, as First Mate and briefly as Master of this ship.

According to the Miramar Ship Index “Cenpac Rounder” was built by Port Weller Dry Docks, St. Catherines, Canada (Yard No. 29) and launched as the “Federal Palm” on the 26/08/1961. She was 3196 gross tons, 90.8 metres LOA, with a beam of 15.8 metres. She became “Cenpac Rounder” in 1972, and is recorded as being broken up in Pusan, Korea with delivery to the breakers on 06/06/1979.

Miramar does not list the machinery, but from my memory she had twin Fairbanks Morse engines coupled to a single shaft. There was a strong rumor that these were in fact surplus WW2 submarine engines obtained on the cheap!

She and her sister vessel “Federal Maple” (built by Canadian Vickers, Montreal) were, according to my memory of documents on board, built as a gift from the Canadian Government to the Government of Trinidad and Tobago for the latter’s independence on 31st August 1962. They basically operated the ferry route between the two islands, and sometimes ventured a little further affield around the Caribbean. Passenger accommodation consisted of two suites, twenty-four ‘First Class’ two-berth cabins and two dormitories with 25 bunks each. There were three cargo holds, two forward of the accommodation separated by a masthouse and served by derricks; and one aft that was served by port and starboard cranes.

After purchase by Nauru Pacific Line she was registered in Nauru and given Nauru Register Official Number 5. She entered an island-hopping service that proved her new name “Cenpac Rounder” was indeed well thought out. If she had a “home port” it would have been Suva, Fiji which seemed to be the base for her operations. Some of the places she called on a regular basis were Suva, Lautoka, Funafuti, Tarawa, Christmas Island, Apia, Majuro, Kusie, Honiara, Lae and of course Nauru. Twice a year she would make a voyage to Hong Kong to transport Chinese contract labour to and from Nauru and Christmas Islands.

“Cenpac Rounder” was the only vessel in the Nauru Pacific Line fleet to not be managed from Nauru House in Melbourne, and to my knowledge she never visited Australia. Nauru Pacific Line in Nauru directly managed her, and this meant an interesting and varied existence for those sailing on board. Some of the anecdotes I recall follow:

One voyage she was on her way from Suva to Lae when ordered by Nauru Agency to divert to Honiara. On arrival the Master headed for the berth, but the local Agent soon appeared in a small boat and asked the vessel to heave to and take the cargo, which consisted of fourteen cases of condensed milk. After loading it, the Agent instructed the Master to proceed with all dispatch to Nauru! This was a considerable deviation from the intended voyage, and the Master queried this not only with the Agent but also with Nauru Agency and Melbourne. He was told to go to Nauru. On arrival at Nauru the vessel heaved to whilst the cargo was discharged into a boat, and she then resumed her voyage to Lae. The local store had run out of tinned milk!

On another occasion she left Lautoka on only the port engine as repairs to the starboard engine had taken longer than expected. About half an hour after dropping the pilot the starboard engine was started, there was an almighty bang, and little pieces of the engine came out through the entablature like pieces of shrapnel. Fortunately nobody was injured. She limped back to Lautoka for survey, but it was impossible to carry out repairs and it was decided the voyage to Christmas Island would continue on one engine – at about eight knots. The Chinese labourers were embarked with the intention (of Nauru Agency) of steaming to Hong Kong on one engine, but at 8 knots all water and food would be consumed long before arrival, and it would therefore be necessary to call at a number of ports en-route for replenishment. So she went to Nauru instead, from where the Chinese labourers were flown to Hong Kong whilst the ship proceeded there at slow speed for her engine repairs.

In 1979 (I’m not sure of the date) she was late leaving Suva as a hurricane approached, and ran aground in poor visibility. Although salvaged she was beyond economic repair and was towed to the breakers in Korea.

There is quite a lot of information on her, including pictures and philately, if you Google “Cenpac Rounder”. I’ve previously uploaded a picture of her on Ships Nostalgia, and a search of her name should retrieve it for you.
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  #57  
Old 14th March 2009, 12:29
bobw bobw is offline  
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Thanks for that 3knots!
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  #58  
Old 30th August 2009, 13:00
rjeaevans rjeaevans is offline  
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Ships nostalgia is so right. Reading about Nauru Pacific brought back many memories, especially of when I was Mate of Enna G in the late 70's running out of San Francisco. The Master was Adam Kroeser and I often wonder what became of him.
Bob Evans
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  #59  
Old 16th October 2011, 00:14
swanning_it swanning_it is offline  
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What a trove of information. Thanks all for your input.

Perhaps someone may be able to assist me with my brief history with the Nauru shipping industry!

Around late 1981 or early 1982, I was an apprentice working in Melbourne and the company I worked for had a contract to supply and install new switchboards to two (I think) of Naurus ships. I can recall the ships as being reasonably large twin engines in single engine room with gantry levels for working on the engines. The control room housed the main switchboard and had a glass window overlooking the engine room. The work was undertaken at the wharves where Docklands now sits.

Can anyone help me with the name of that (those) ships? Any assistance would be very much appreciated.
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  #60  
Old 7th December 2011, 07:33
garry Norton garry Norton is offline  
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When I worked in the British Solomon Islands we sent some of our redundant crew to Nauru Shipping company.We also had one of their ships call into Honiara with a box of nails. I called into Nauru on the Bellama to land a person for the Marshal Islands on my way from the Gilberts to Honiara after repatriotating Gilbertise from the New Hebrides on a French Government charter.
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  #61  
Old 16th December 2011, 10:38
Mark FRANKLING Mark FRANKLING is offline  
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Shipping Nostalgia - Nauru (1977-1981)

Hi Everybody!!!

My Father, Roger E Frankling was employed by the Nauru Phosphate Corporation ( 1977-1981 ) as a "STEVEDORE SUPERVISOR" at the Nauru Boat Harbour. Roger was in charge of 13 - Pacific Islanders supervising them in all aspects of marine work carried out by the department. He was also a "MARINE SCUBA DIVER" (CERTIFIED) in charge of all equipment at the marine department. His responsibilities included the mooring changes.

HARBOUR MASTER CAPTAIN P.G HOILES (1979)


My father also enjoyed a "cup of tea" & "chat" with the "Senior Stevedores" Mr Geoff Lax / Mr McGinty / "Gentleman George" the only one on Nauru to own a BMW. He lived directly above the golfcourse. Roger's favourite ships were the M.V "EIGAMOIYA" / M.V "VALETTA"


My "Dad" Roger E Frankling then moved on to Bougainville Island/ Papua New Guinea. He was a "Assistant Manager" at the Kieta wharf employed by Rabaul Stevedores. (1981-1989 ). He was good friends with Mr John Fieldhouse "BURNS & PHILIP SHIPPING AGENT" / Captain - Vic Fisher " Lae Chief " & with the Legendary Mr Bob Strong "Transport Manager" for Rabaul Stevedores. His friend Mr Bob Strong was also the manager of the Toboroi plantation.

I am looking for the "complete" list of ships that sailed to Nauru & Bougainville in the 1970's & 1980,s. (Sadly Roger passed away on the Isle of Wight U.K- 2001). I am looking for "old" photos/postcards/ great memories... (I am his eldest son.)


Kind Regards


Mark FRANKLING [FRANCE]

Last edited by Mark FRANKLING; 16th December 2011 at 14:14..
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  #62  
Old 9th April 2012, 13:02
Brackenboy Brackenboy is offline  
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Nauru Shipping Line

I worked for the Nauru Local Govt Council at Nauru House (Mel) in the early 1970's. I wore many different hats, one was ground staff for Air Nauru which meant stayingt overnight at the Tullamarine Travelodge to receive and check in passengers for the very early departures. Another hat was customer relations for Nauru Shipping. The older passengers avoided the Eigamoiya because it had no doctor aboard (carried only 10 passengers). The Enna G was popular and had several regular passengers and was a nice little ship and although it could take 125 passengers it never had anywhere near that number. Not for the want of trying and hinting I never did get to visit Nauru Island.
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  #63  
Old 9th April 2012, 13:11
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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You never missed a thing, Brackenboy, apart from Aunty Peggy's bar with the piglets running around (think she was called Peggy). Welcome to SN. Lots of stuff on here about Nauru and Nauru Pacific.

John T.
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  #64  
Old 14th October 2012, 22:55
BPCkid BPCkid is offline  
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Other BPC vessels

The other BPC vessels were: TRIASTER & TRIENZA(the only one not to be sunk by Germans)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mc OZ View Post
Re Nauru shipping . My Father worked there after Japs bombed the place Re building the cantiiever. Mum and Dad were married there . The ships that serviced the Phosphate run were the TRIONA TRIADIC TRI-ELLIS owened by the British Phosphate commission Mark T.
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  #65  
Old 18th October 2012, 11:51
ray morgan ray morgan is offline  
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I was there on the "Baron Minto" in 1963 or 1964 loading Phosthates for Port Kembla,never got ashore in Nauru,had a look on Google Earth seen photos of the Hotel and old empty Swimming Pool and one of a small gap in the sandhills were it said they launched there canoes,I believe a site for Boat Peoples Detention is there now.

Last edited by ray morgan; 18th October 2012 at 11:55.. Reason: tidying up.
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  #66  
Old 24th December 2012, 19:20
Holmes 40 Holmes 40 is offline
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Greetings to all contributors to and readers of this history of some Nauruan ships and Nauru nostalgia generally.
My contribution follows.

I was appointed Senior Legal Officer and then Secretary of the Department of Justice in the Nauru Public Service in 1968. The entire administration of justice together with various judicial and advisory duties to the President (Hammer de Roburt), the new Cabinet and Parliament and its members became my responsibility.Part of that responsibility was as Registrar of Ships following the decision of the Government to create a Registry and then to register the MV Eigamoiya then under construction in Leith, Scotland In the Henry Robb Shipyards.
Robb's client was the Nauru Local Government Council (NLGC).
The NLGC was largely the representative body of elected local officials which agitated for self government for Nauru, achieving that goal in 1968. A number of Councillors became Members of Parliament.The NLGC was comprised of senior elected people from the Tribes of Nauru. The flag of Nauru with its 12 pointed star depicts those 12 tribes.
Nauru is traditionally a matriarchal society and MV Eigamoiya was named after an early queen of Nauru from the middle 19th century.
Other ships of the Nauru Pacific Line
KOLLE D - named after Kolle De Roburt wife of the Head Chief and then President of the Republic, Hammer deRoburt.
ENNA G - named after Enna Gadabu the wife of Ray Gadabu similarly an early Chief
ROSIE D - named after the wife of Timothy Detudamo also an early Head Chief
each follow this tradition.

I could continue with further history of life on the Island at that time and in relation to my work duties, but space and time will here not permit.

In 1971 I was asked to assume a temporary appointment in Melbourne as Nauru Government Representative for Australia and New Zealand. That 'temporary' posting existed until 1974.
I was heavily involved in all aspects of the Nauru Pacific Line and itsbships as well as membership of the Nauru Phosphate Royalties Trust which, as a statutory body under Nauruan Law was charged with investing the royalty monies from mining.
As one example we entered into the construction of Nauru House in Collins Street.

After a time in private business both as a lawyer and adviser to industry associations the President asked me to take over the role as Nauru's Consul General in Auckland, New Zealand in 1983. I spent another two years for Nauru in that position with full consular duties and as member of the Nauru Phosphate Corporation Board.

At one point the New Zealand Seamans Union impounded the Enna G in Wellington over Pacific Islander crewing issues for a period in excess of 6 weeks. I vividly recall a meeting between President deRoburt and Prime Minister Kirk where the two came very close to exchanging blows. The ship was released shortly thereafter.

I have lost contact with many of the people with whom I worked and Nauruan friends built up over those years of stewardship but which I recall with both satisfaction and pleasure. I do regard the Nauruan people with respect , although their fortunes have been more recently under great duress.
Some people with a passing knowledge of Nauru and the Nauru people chose to cast derogatory views about the way in which Nauru was administered. Some expatriates and others in the employ of Nauru instrumentalities took the view that it was in their selfish interests to take as much money out of Nauru as possible without a conscious effort to contribute to the advancement of Nauru's interests. Those people do no justice to themselves- particularly as they variously relate half truths and joke about their experience.
Nauru surely has its problems and the Nauruans sometimes took ill- guided decisions more related to the heart than by European logic. All in all however given their background those leaders had both integrity and standards of compassion and justice.

A parting comment which may be of interest to readers not familiar with Nauru's racial origins.

They are in fact a distinct race and most anthropologists and historians have those origins with Melanesian, Micronesian and Polynesian influences as cornerstones.

Due to Nauru's occupation/ possession / administration in the 20th century variously by German, Japanese and European countries so the traditional Pacific racial mix has gradually become less predominant.


With regards

Anthony (Tony) Holmes
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  #67  
Old 26th December 2012, 01:03
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Photo of Eigamoya alongside Duke and Orr's here https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/galler...gamoya/cat/all
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  #68  
Old 18th July 2013, 11:40
Mike Dovey Mike Dovey is offline  
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Registered in Nauru

The first ship to be registered in Nauru was the 1969 MV Eigamoiya, the 4th was the Enna G, followed by 5 - Cenpac Rounder, & 6 Kolle D, etc. This leaves numbers 2 & 3. One of these is the ex British Phosphate ship which became the MV Rosie D so my question is:- What was the name of the missing ship and any information as to a previous life ?
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  #69  
Old 18th July 2013, 22:04
Holmes 40 Holmes 40 is offline
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M V Rosie D

Greetings Mike,

I am confident that MV Rosie D owned and operated by the Nauru Local Government Council (NLGC) was purchased from the British Phosphate Commission which used her as a general cargo and phosphate carrier into and from Christmas Island and Nauru and various Australian and New Zealand ports.
The ship also had fresh water carrying capacity for supply on Nauru.
The name of the ship prior to NLGC ownership was MV Triaster, sister ship to MV Trienza.
If your records show the registration order of other NLGC ships as you record I regrettably cannot offer alternative view or information about #3 in your list.

Cheers

Anthony Holmes
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  #70  
Old 18th July 2013, 23:39
Holmes 40 Holmes 40 is offline
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Triaster/Rosie D

Mike,
Further to earlier, you might want to look at this link for further verification

http://www.shipspotting.com/gallery/...php?lid=122758

Cheers

Anthony Holmes
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  #71  
Old 19th July 2013, 11:49
bobw bobw is offline  
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Nauru Pacific Line ships: mv EIGAMOIYA, mv TRYPHENA, mv ROSIE D, mv ENNA G, mv CENPAC ROUNDER, mv EIGIGU, mv KOLLE D, .
A couple of other vessels were chartered as required.
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  #72  
Old 20th July 2013, 08:33
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A.D.FROST A.D.FROST is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Dovey View Post
The first ship to be registered in Nauru was the 1969 MV Eigamoiya, the 4th was the Enna G, followed by 5 - Cenpac Rounder, & 6 Kolle D, etc. This leaves numbers 2 & 3. One of these is the ex British Phosphate ship which became the MV Rosie D so my question is:- What was the name of the missing ship and any information as to a previous life ?
ROSIE D.(BPC.ex.TRASTER) and TRIPHENA (BPC.ex.TRI-ELLIS) Last ship ROSIE D.(II)sis.KOLLE D.bulk carrier.
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  #73  
Old 20th July 2013, 10:11
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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Just for interest. The "assylum seeker" boat people who are currently housed on Nauru rioted last night. Sounds like they burned the place down. Not happy with the new "Final Solution to the Boat People Problem" perhaps - no access to Australia, sent to New Guinea where they will be safe from their "enemies". Lucky things.

John T
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  #74  
Old 20th July 2013, 11:49
Mike Dovey Mike Dovey is offline  
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Fleet list

Many thanks for all the replies, I have worked out that the list below is correct for the first 9 ships registered in Nauru and that number 2 & 3 is the same ship with a name change. If anything below is not correct then could you let me know, also while I have tried to get it all in some order when I press the send button all of below could become a real mess so my apologies in advance.

1 EIGAMOIYA 1969 Nauru Local Gov. Council sold - 1993
2 Triaster 1970 Nauru Local Gov. Council re-registered same
year as Rosie D
3 Rosie D ex TRIASTER - 1955 1970 Nauru Local Gov. Council
sold - 1975
4 ENNA G ex PRINSES MARGRIET -64 1970
Nauru Local Gov. Council scrapped-1990
5 CENPAC ROUNDER ex FEDERAL PALM - 61 1971 Nauru Local Gov. Council scrapped-1979
6 KOLLE D 1973 Nauru Corp (Victoria) Ltd sold-1988
7 Tryphena ex TRI-ELLIS - 1958 1974 Nauru Local Gov. Council
sold-1978
8 ROSIE D 1977 Nauru Corp (Victoria) Ltd sold-1991
9 Cenpac 2 ex Kyokyu Maru - 1970 1982 Nauru Corp (Victoria) Inc
sold-1988
10 Eigugu ex Booker Challenge - 1979 1983 Nauru Pacific Line
sold-1989
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  #75  
Old 20th July 2013, 22:15
Holmes 40 Holmes 40 is offline
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Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 4
Greetings Mike,
Your listing details tally with my memory.
Good hunting!

Cheers

Anthony H
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