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What was the most frightening thing that happened to you?

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  #51  
Old 27th December 2014, 18:04
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Pat Kennedy Pat Kennedy is offline  
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I was on an Emirates Airbus in 1993, heading into Hong Kong during a typhoon. We got the word to fasten our seat belts and then plunged into total blackness as the plane entered a huge thundercloud.
I was seated across from one of the cabin crew who was on one of those jump seats by the rear door.
After a few minutes of wild buffeting she began to tell anyone in earshot not to worry, this plane was very strong and the pilot very experienced.
Then there was an almighty flash/bang as a lighning strike hit the rudder, and she started wailing, "We're all going to die"!
I believed her, and so did everyone around us. I never saw so many people turn to God so quickly. There were mumbled prayers and signs of the cross all around, the plane was lurching and vibrating, and banking quite steeply, and then we emerged from the cloud only a few metres above the runway and landed safely.
The (Aussie) pilot got a standing ovation.

Pat
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  #52  
Old 27th December 2014, 20:59
holland25 holland25 is offline  
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Blue Star, Western Approaches in a thick fog,no Radar, racing along at 10 knts trying to make the tide so we could arrive on a Saturday. The Captain asked me to keep an ear open, and let him know if I heard any of the big liners coming out of Southampton. I was only 18 at the time and didn't feel frightened,I do now though.
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  #53  
Old 28th December 2014, 16:29
William Clark8 William Clark8 is offline  
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Scary

In 1967 was in the middle of Atlantic storm on board Esso Winchester
when due to sea state she left the water completely that when she
she came down again it was with such a force we thought she
was going to brake her back. The shuddering went on for ages.
I had bgeen through many Storms before but that Took the Biscuiut
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  #54  
Old 4th January 2015, 17:57
Biggles Wader Biggles Wader is online now  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barrie Youde View Post
#10

Precisely the same experience as Hugh. We were in ballast in North China (Hsin Kiang). Radnorshire (A-Class Blue Funnel, transferred to Glen Line).

In a dimly lit tween deck. Number one hatch. Port side. One hatch-board had been pulled to one side, to starboard, leaving a gap of about five feet above an empty lower hold, with a potential drop of about fifteen feet or more. Unknowing, unwary and in the dim light I stepped off the hatch board. Fortunately I was facing forward. My left leg went straight down the gap and my left arm automatically went up and out. Fortunately my left armpit fell precisely on the hatch-coaming, with my right leg from knee downwards still on the hatchboard; and the fall was thus arrested completely, with no injury. But it was a terrifying experience, never forgotten.

What made it worse was that I was alone and it would have been a long time before anybody would either have found me or even might have heard any shout from me.
I did much the same and fell through an open trimming hatch.Somehow I put my arms out and held on and my oppo pulled me out.
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  #55  
Old 8th January 2015, 14:59
ccurtis1 ccurtis1 is offline  
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A similar experience to Pat. Aboard a United 747 from Buenos Aires to Santiago and we were told to fasten seat belts as excessive turbulence was expected as we approached the Andes, but that the 747 was the best equipped airliner to cope. Scared? You bet. Even the cabin crew were ashen faced. It was then that I realised that adrenalin was brown coloured.
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  #56  
Old 9th January 2015, 10:14
Leratty Leratty is offline  
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Courtis1, similar experience in Aus fly Cairns to Weipa as we were carrying out a major upgrade & expansion.

I had recently read the story of the plane crash in the Andes where unusual meals were partaken of. Anyway on a chartered Fokker just over half way there over god awful crocodile infested mangroves & one engine just exploded with a huge bag smoke + flames seriously scary!

Pilot came on & said " too far from Cairns to go back worse doubted we could make Weipa???? All I could think about was salt water croc's & eating human flesh):

We got to an old WW2 US air strip & landed. There was no one there until a grazier turned up saying he had called Cairns & we would be picked up tomorrow which we were.

TV the whole works in Weipa when we landed but no one wished to talk about it so they got zip of a story.

Interesting if scary experience.
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  #57  
Old 9th January 2015, 11:08
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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On one leg of a Singapore airlines flight to Rome last year, they ran out of my choice of grub and I nearly had to eat some foreign muck. Luckily, I'm always prepared for this disaster and had a bag full of Barbecue Chips (Crisps).

John T
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  #58  
Old 13th January 2015, 21:02
ian keyl ian keyl is offline  
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Swimming in the Indian Ocean.
Having grown up in Kenya and swam in the Indian Ocean many times it had no fears for me unless you dropped off the reef at low tide.

In this case i was well into my career in the MN and homeward bound from the FE we had to put into Durban due to a bust piston. This was in 1968 onboard the Benhope (ex Egidea). It was Easter weekend all bars and joints were closed. We were put on the new berth that later became the New container berth. The mates and cadets had nothing to do so the second mate Yip Nai Kong myself and a cadet decided we would go for a swim.
I had been to Durban before and we were near the Brighton beach just thru the tank farm and over the bluff.

we made short work of the walk and ran down to the beach beautiful blue sea and breakers which didn't look too cruel.

Yip and I both ran and dived into the breakers something i had done many times before elsewhere. Something happened my life had come to an end i was in something like 60 thousand leagues under the sea I was seeing alsorts of things and i was up one second down the other wondering where the hell the surface was and no sign of Yip. I hit the bottom and traveled a distance but had no idea which way i was heading (i could have been magnetic or true it didn't make a dam) .
The next minute I appeared on the beach as if i had been thrown thereby an octopus I lay there then Yip appeared 10 yards up the beach. I lay for about five minutes wondering whether i should cry or pray to see which world i was in.
The cadet had never entered the water and came running up the beach to us saying he had been crapping himself because he thought we were never coming out and he hadn't seen any sign of us.

My chest and shoulders were bleeding and my cosie had about half a ton of sand and shells in it. Any woman would have been proud of me when i stood up and showed the bulge in the front of my cosie.

I have to admit i have never estimated the under current and serge of the undertow on that beach I had thought and so did Yip that were both gone for ever. I have had a few scrapes but that did truly put the fear up me . It once happened off Cromer beach but it was nothing like the Brighton Beach Durban .
Best staying in the shallow end.
Rgds Ian
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  #59  
Old 13th January 2015, 21:59
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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Wasn't the Smugglers in that area, Ian? A safer option.

John T
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  #60  
Old 17th January 2015, 21:07
rickzek rickzek is offline  
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Woken up one Sunday morning to alarms sounding no problem boat drill day
bit odd it was 5.30am. Strolled up to the muster point ,every one thinking the
same thoughts who's bright idea was this . The 2nd says its for real ! but there is a problem the engine room is on fire but the computer will not open the doors
till 7am and they cannot be disabled as we where part loaded with naptha that was scary .So much for unmanned sealed engine rooms.
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  #61  
Old 18th January 2015, 08:42
Keith Adkins Keith Adkins is offline  
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In 1962 I was on the Shell Eastern ss Gena trading from Singapore etc. The 2nd Mate had built himself a "sailing dinghy" and whilst in Sourabaya decided that it would be good time to give it a trial run! I hadn't anything better to do that day and volunteered to be crew(having never ever or since been on a vessel without and engine) Off we sailed into the harbour with the usual amount of very large (to me) vessels all around us with bow waves to match and a freeboard of approx 3-4"(my estimate) on our little dinghy. The 2nd Mate thought it great fun being tossed about, me less so. I have never been so relieved to to rejoin a ship in my life. If my memory is correct he was banned from ever using the "dinghy" again by the Old Man who had witnessed the whole event and had been powerless to do much about it until we got back, needless to say we didn't have any safety equipment at all
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  #62  
Old 18th January 2015, 09:39
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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Should have gone to the Jungle Bar, Keith. As long as you didn't let them put ice in your beer, it was reasonably safe and a definite laugh.

John T.
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  #63  
Old 25th January 2015, 16:06
Puffin's skipper Puffin's skipper is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marconiman View Post
North Atlantic Force 9 off Grand Banks 30,000T Container ship with three high on deck, engine dies. The old man goes pale which is a bit unsettling for the rest of us, ER cannot restore power, situation worsens, as forward way decreases and wind now taking over, last resort bow thruster, thankfully enough amps available and the bow brought back into wind. Engineers get power back and on we go.

Another occasion, same ship Dart Atlantic ploughing along at 24 knots in thick fog and darkness, fog horn going, radars on plot. I'm off watch in cabin, when a different and very loud blast is heard, looking out of the port on port side there is a blaze of lights and superstructure close enough to lob a beer can on, flashing by at speed. A search light on the other ship scans our stern for name and registration then it is gone into the fog and blackness. On recalling this at 7 bell breakfast to the Third Mate whose watch it was I was met with amazement and incredulity as if I had a bad dream. Which is understandable, happy days.
Yup... Now that IS scary brother.. especially as THEY passed to port and were trying to identify YOU to report to maritime authorities.... whoops..
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  #64  
Old 25th January 2015, 16:32
Puffin's skipper Puffin's skipper is offline
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Originally Posted by ian keyl View Post
Swimming in the Indian Ocean.
Swimming in Bitter Lakes.. (Mid Suez Canal) as deckboy on BP tanker on way OUT to Gulf for Black oil.. as we anchored and waited for clearance to enter bottom section of canal lots of us cooled off by diving in and swimming around the companionway ladder platform.
Great fun, no problems at all...

On way back loaded, as we anchored (Red Sea end) and waited for clearance to enter canal I again remembered what fun the swim had been and went down ladder and dived in again to cool off, solo this time..
The Messman came on deck, emptied the gash bucket over the wall then saw me and started screaming frantically at me to get out...
As I got on the platform I saw why... half a dozen black fins were thrashing about in water around where the gash had gone in...

Back on board and in shock I was given a lesson in Suez marine biology.
Port Said end, Bitter Lakes middle = NO sharks... RED SEA = Lots of Sharks...
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  #65  
Old 4th February 2015, 16:50
DURANGO DURANGO is offline  
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Originally Posted by Pat Kennedy View Post
I was on an Emirates Airbus in 1993, heading into Hong Kong during a typhoon. We got the word to fasten our seat belts and then plunged into total blackness as the plane entered a huge thundercloud.
I was seated across from one of the cabin crew who was on one of those jump seats by the rear door.
After a few minutes of wild buffeting she began to tell anyone in earshot not to worry, this plane was very strong and the pilot very experienced.
Then there was an almighty flash/bang as a lighning strike hit the rudder, and she started wailing, "We're all going to die"!
I believed her, and so did everyone around us. I never saw so many people turn to God so quickly. There were mumbled prayers and signs of the cross all around, the plane was lurching and vibrating, and banking quite steeply, and then we emerged from the cloud only a few metres above the runway and landed safely.
The (Aussie) pilot got a standing ovation.

Pat
Was that landing at Kai Tack airport Pat I landed there in 1961 at the time I thought this aint to much fun we just came of the clouds and there we where landing amongst all these blocks of flats regards .
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  #66  
Old 13th February 2015, 00:16
Puffin's skipper Puffin's skipper is offline
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Originally Posted by arthur elletson View Post
had a few when I was at sea one I remember was we were homeward bound from brazil(ss rialto 1969)discharged most of the cargo in Dunkirk then sailed to sunderland it was in jan 69 in the north sea when a freak wave hit us side on ,I was on the top bunk and ended up on the single bunk on the otherside of the cabin the second mate said later the gauge on the bridge had passed the no return point finished going to sea after that(well for a week)
Was that Ellermans Wilson's Rialto? I was on her in 62 but she was on regular 6 weekers to the Candian Lakes for Grain, not general Cargo Tramping.
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  #67  
Old 13th February 2015, 10:51
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arthur elletson arthur elletson is offline  
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yes it was the Wilson line s/s rialto she did a few trips tramping before been sold ,we did 3 months down brazil the trip before we did 4months around india ,the trip after I left I think she went to Liverpool then around Trinidad and the states.
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  #68  
Old 13th February 2015, 11:41
ChasH ChasH is offline  
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chasH

I was on lookout on the monkey island in the west indies big tropical storm, what I'm going to tell you was told to me after the advent, what i remember was a massive bang and felt like i had been kicked really hard in the stomach, i came round in the ships hospital (luckily)
2 black eyes and cheek bones, skin shrivelled like when you get out of the bath my clothes apparently bone dry, yet they were soaking wet, the rain was very warm ( no oilskins), they told me i had connected to the lightning in some way, the 2nd mate middle watch told me there was a huge bang in the wheelhouse radar was knocked out and i think some other electrical gadgets, a couple of days later i was fine other than the bruises, so they didn't put me ashore, put me on light duties for the rest of the trip, i always thought (wrongly) that lightning would travel right down through the ship into the water so what are the lightning conductors for. chas
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  #69  
Old 13th February 2015, 22:57
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Pat Kennedy Pat Kennedy is offline  
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Originally Posted by DURANGO View Post
Was that landing at Kai Tack airport Pat I landed there in 1961 at the time I thought this aint to much fun we just came of the clouds and there we where landing amongst all these blocks of flats regards .
Yes it was the old HK airport, as you say it was surrounded by skyscrapers. The plane that came in after us, a China Airlines Boeing 747-400 skidded off the Kai Tak runway into Victoria Harbour on landing.
It was November 4, 1993. I kept a newspaper clipping from the South China Morning Post about the incident for many years.
Pat
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  #70  
Old 14th February 2015, 00:15
Puffin's skipper Puffin's skipper is offline
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Originally Posted by ChasH View Post
I was on lookout on the monkey island in the west indies big tropical storm, what I'm going to tell you was told to me after the advent, what i remember was a massive bang and felt like i had been kicked really hard in the stomach, i came round in the ships hospital (luckily)
2 black eyes and cheek bones, skin shrivelled like when you get out of the bath my clothes apparently bone dry, yet they were soaking wet, the rain was very warm ( no oilskins), they told me i had connected to the lightning in some way, the 2nd mate middle watch told me there was a huge bang in the wheelhouse radar was knocked out and i think some other electrical gadgets, a couple of days later i was fine other than the bruises, so they didn't put me ashore, put me on light duties for the rest of the trip, i always thought (wrongly) that lightning would travel right down through the ship into the water so what are the lightning conductors for. chas
That is really weird, because on lookout I used to crap myself watching huge forked lightening bolts snaking sometimes hundreds of miles across the ocean straight towards us... especially in the pacific miles from land.. It was clearly "targeting" the ship to strike.. but then .... when it finally hit us it was less of an event than a Tiger beer fart.. more like a damp squib making a dull plop.. All I can think of is I was usually on the bridge wing, not the Monkey Island and it usual "earthed" on the highest metal of the ship above us.. (Mast or lightning Rods?)
Perhaps you were so high up and the rods painted so thick it earthed down to the sea "through" you as the least path of resistance..? Either way you were bloody lucky..
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  #71  
Old 14th February 2015, 00:55
Puffin's skipper Puffin's skipper is offline
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Unhappy

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Originally Posted by arthur elletson View Post
yes it was the Wilson line s/s rialto she did a few trips tramping before been sold ,we did 3 months down brazil the trip before we did 4months around india ,the trip after I left I think she went to Liverpool then around Trinidad and the states.
I'm not surprised at what you say about her nearly turning T.. That ship was the one and only ship I was EVER seasick on.. It was off Newfoundland in Mid winter, we had all the forehatch boards stove in in a force ten. She had been nearly standing up on her screw one minute and green water up to the bridge the next. Boards... boards? yes Hatch boards me Harties Tarps, wooden boards & cleat wedges on the old Rialto.. They turned her stern into the huge seas, rigged safety lines for us to clip to and all hands battened her hatchboards back down in place again like REAL sailor men.. That ship would roll in wet grass anyway but later that night she danced the light Fandango when we finally got her under way again.. Screw spinning out of the water more than in it. I was sick as a dog, 1st and last time ever.. I honestly though she was going over a few times. Crazy WNA seas..
I was only a JOS but when looked around and saw the Mate, Norsk AB's and the hard case Bosun all with grey worried faces too and no-one taking the piss or joking any more then believe me, I was certainly glad to finally steam into Quebec.. (I Think there's a pic of Rialto on here btw.. Leaving KG5. Hull)

Last edited by Puffin's skipper; 14th February 2015 at 01:06..
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  #72  
Old 14th February 2015, 13:59
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Originally Posted by Puffin's skipper View Post
Crazy WNA seas..
I was only a JOS but when looked around and saw the Mate, Norsk AB's and the hard case Bosun all with grey worried faces too and no-one taking the piss or joking any more then believe me, I was certainly glad to finally steam into Quebec.. (I Think there's a pic of Rialto on here btw.. Leaving KG5. Hull)
As the saying goes, in a bad storm, there are no non-believers!
Rgds.
Dave
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  #73  
Old 14th February 2015, 15:31
Puffin's skipper Puffin's skipper is offline
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Careless Talk costs lives..?

Hammerfest, (Norway) is the most northerly port in the world (its said) Its inside the Arctic Circle anyway.. (and effin cold)

I was Matross on a small Norsk coaster, "Tobin" in the early 70's and we once called up there with cargo from Oslo or Stavanger..

In a local bar (with tongue lubricated) I happened to mention I'd been up there once before, in about 1968 on the Brit Shell Tanker "Alinda" running fuel to the Yank "early warning" bombers at a nearly NATO base....

Even as I said it I realised that as the Alinda had gone aground on the way in that trip, ruptured two fo'rard tanks and sprayed aviation turbine spirit all over the Fjord, (ruining the livelihood of the local fisherman for several years afterwards) on reflection it might perhaps not have been the best 'light conversation" to utter to endear me to the locals..

Its ok, I was only a couple of days sitting on the Ice flow they set me adrift on before my mates found me.. "Up here you p'haps best stay aboard now Engleesh" .. I did..

Last edited by Puffin's skipper; 14th February 2015 at 15:35..
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  #74  
Old 28th January 2016, 11:49
Tensing Ng (Robert) Tensing Ng (Robert) is offline  
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Nearly Drowned in Tampa

A story from my Book Always in My Blood probably my scariest moment:

A Lucky Escape
The ship docked in Tampa Florida. We seemed to be miles from anywhere, so after lunch, I had two hours off and a few of us decided to head out to a small beach that we had noticed while coming into port.
It was a beautiful beach, but surprisingly quiet, The sand was soft and fine and the weather was such that it was also very hot making walking on it akin to walking on hot coals. Not being a strong swimmer, I relaxed in warm clear waters close to the shoreline. After half an hour I edged into deeper water, making sure my feet kept contact with the seabed. A strong wave hit me taking my feet from under me, unable to regain contact, the strong current started pushing me out into deeper waters. Panic set in as I fought the strong current, striking out for shore to no avail. I could feel myself being forced out to a headland across the bay. Being low in the water my friends disappeared from sight. My arms and legs were becoming leaden and I was tiring quickly with all the effort. Swallowing mouthfuls of incredibly salty seawater, made me panic even more. I rested and decided to float, lying on my back to conserve energy. I was hoping the current would push me closer to the headland ahead.
My life flashed before me. What a way to go, so far from home with no goodbyes. I soon realised I was being drawn past the headland and into open seas. Survival took over and I made one last desperate attempt to swim to the headland. It is amazing what reserves of energy you acquire when the odds are against you. About a quarter of a mile from the headland, my knee hit a boulder; I pushed myself forward to find my toes touching the bottom. Sharp coral pierced the soles of my feet; I lifted my legs and tried to half swim half float over it. My knees and hands became the target of the unrelenting coral. All this time the waves were buffeting me closer to the shore, I ended up on my forearms and knees crawling up the beach, with every movement adding to the wounds of my already lacerated body. I eventually reached soft sand and collapsed on the beach. Almost immediately, I became very cold and started violently shaking. This I believe was the effects of shock. Water was lapping at my body but I could not find the energy to move.
From the distance, I could hear voices filtering through the sound of the waves lapping up against my face. Raising my sand encrusted face, I spotted two men running towards me. They had seen me from the top of the cliff struggling in the sea. One went back for a blanket, but it was an age before I could stop the convulsive shaking. After a short rest, they helped me up the rocks. They loaded me into a truck and took me back to the ship. My friends had reported me missing and feared I had drowned. They were about to report to the local coastguard, when the truck carrying me pulled up to the gangway.
For the first time on this trip, I was glad to be back on the Cape Wrath. The chief steward called the ship's agent who took me to the local hospital, where they treated my wounds and gave me a course of antibiotics. For the next three weeks, I was walking around like an Egyptian mummy. From then on I practiced swimming at every opportunity. However, to this day it's not one of my strong points, but I have learned my lesson and ever since I hug the shoreline.
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  #75  
Old 28th January 2016, 12:07
tiachapman tiachapman is offline  
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taking the soundings one morning on our way back from Murmansk down on out marks with a load of iron ore.a freak wave washed me and my rods halfway along the main deck
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