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  #376  
Old 24th February 2018, 19:02
Robert Macdonald Robert Macdonald is offline  
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Hebridean accent

Nick the Vikings [Norwegian branch] ruled the Hebrides including Skye for a considerable time before being driven out by the Lord of the Isles.

The Norwegian control of both the Inner and Outer Hebrides would see almost constant warfare until being ultimately resolved by the partitioning of the Western Isles in 1156. The Outer Hebrides would remain under the Kingdom of Mann and the Isles while the Inner Hebrides broke out under Somerled, the Norse-Celtic kinsman of both Lulach and the Manx royal house. Although the Inner Hebrides, from 1156 known as the Kingdom of the Hebrides, was still nominally under the sovereignty of Norway, the leaders were Scottish in language and Gaelic in culture rather than Norse.
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  #377  
Old 25th February 2018, 06:57
peterlball peterlball is offline
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They are all ex-Indo China SN Co people that we sailed with or knew. Good to hear that they are still out there alive and kicking.
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  #378  
Old 5th March 2018, 19:42
Guernsey43 Guernsey43 is offline  
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Hi Nick,
Hope you are well.
As far as i remember Eric Dunbar's bar was just called "The Pub", but i cannot be sure of that.
If you send me your email address i will send you a photo of Amanda's christening at St. Joseph's Church HK. I am sure you will know most if not all the peole in that photo.
ATB Peter.
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  #379  
Old 5th March 2018, 20:23
nickwilson89 nickwilson89 is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Guernsey43 View Post
Hi Nick,
Hope you are well.
As far as i remember Eric Dunbar's bar was just called "The Pub", but i cannot be sure of that.
If you send me your email address i will send you a photo of Amanda's christening at St. Joseph's Church HK. I am sure you will know most if not all the peole in that photo.
ATB Peter.
Peter, Very good to hear from you again. Yes, the name for Eric's pub does ring a bell. A very inventive fellow, was Eric!

My email address is [email protected] and yes, I would enjoy receiving the christening photo and any others.

I remember your showing an interest earlier in obtaining a photo of No. 20 Mount Austin Road and was sorry I could not help. However we were back in HK in early November and after taking the bus up to the Peak Tram walked the last half mile to what is No. 20 to-day. Of course totally changed, and we were upset the officious gatekeeper, a Canadian citizen no less (one of HK's 200,000), would not allow us to walk to the front to enjoy the old view one last time.

All the best,

Nick
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  #380  
Old 6th March 2018, 10:32
peterlball peterlball is offline
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My recollection is that Eric Dunbars' bar was called - "The Ship Inn" - if that was the bar just over the road or on the next road from "Joes Bar". Joe used to keep a gun under the bar in case of any heavies coming in wanting protection money - that was an ongoing problem along the road, sometimes reported in the newspapers. Peter Ballantyne
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  #381  
Old 6th March 2018, 10:43
Guernsey43 Guernsey43 is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by peterlball View Post
My recollection is that Eric Dunbars' bar was called - "The Ship Inn" - if that was the bar just over the road or on the next road from "Joes Bar". Joe used to keep a gun under the bar in case of any heavies coming in wanting protection money - that was an ongoing problem along the road, sometimes reported in the newspapers. Peter Ballantyne
Hi Pete,

Eric's bar was on HK side, not Kowloon.
I remember Joe's Bar especially well. Not only good beer, but fantastic steaks, " New Zealand Beef, fresh flown in", i think was the caption.
Spent a lot of time there whilst up for Mate's ticket.

ATB,
Pete.
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  #382  
Old 6th March 2018, 11:28
peterlball peterlball is offline
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Oh - my memory has deteriorated same as my body, lol. I was ashore in HK in the Clover Hotel at the same time as you, for mates ticket - we probably had a few beers together at that time in Joes Bar.
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  #383  
Old 6th March 2018, 16:59
nickwilson89 nickwilson89 is offline  
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The Pub was up D'Aguilar Street next door to a Wimpys burger place so although popular with ICSN people past and present it was well placed for the office trade being just a few steps away from Pedder Street.
I remember The Ship Inn, and the Hasty-Tasty next door, were on Humphrey Avenue across the road from the Honolulu Bar, both owned, I believe, by Ted Bachelor. The Honolulu was owned by the same group of Shanghaiese sisters who c.1960 opened the Five Sisters Bar on Minden Avenue , a place I remember still being at the same location in 1988 when I briefly visited HK.

Joe's was across from The Palm Court at the intersection of Cameron and Carnarvon Roads.

Nick
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  #384  
Old 6th March 2018, 22:50
peterlball peterlball is offline
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I remember the Palm Court from before I joined ICSN Co. As a cadet with E&A Line I got to know well the ICSN ships because of the hospitality and frequent party events aboard the ships. So I visited the ships (when in port together) and got to hear about the meet-ups at The Palm Court in Kowloon, which were always happy occasions - large groups sitting in a wide circle taking up the lobby lounge area. I made a point of getting there when in HK. This all convinced me that ICSN was the outfit to sail with after I obtained my ticket.
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  #385  
Old 8th March 2018, 04:56
Robert Macdonald Robert Macdonald is offline  
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John Macdonald Purser Eastern Queen

Old Eastern Queen hands will probably have sailed with John Macdonald Purser on her in late 1960s.

He came from a long line of seafarers from Scotland via New Zealand.

There is a fascinating genealogy site of them at

Macdonald a History of Men and Sea at

http://macdonald.gracies-place.net/index.php

I am not related to him but sailed with him twice 1 On Rosie-D [Ex BPC Triaster] and 2 On Princess Marguerite [ex Holland America Line]

However my father Robert William Macdonald sailed with his father Hector Macdonald in 1937 on the EGRA on BIs Calcutta-Rangoon Mail.

Hector went on to be B.I. Commodore in 1952, a year before I joined B.I. as a cadet.
My father was lost when his ship Calabria was torpedoed with all hands in 1940.
My uncle Charles Farquharson Macdonald also served with B I but as far as I can see didn't sail with Hector.

John Macdonald's family were also related to Major General Sir Hector Archibald MacDonald, KCB, DSO also known as Fighting Mac, was a distinguished Victorian soldier. The son of a crofter, MacDonald left school before he was 15, enlisted in the Gordon Highlanders as a private at 17, and finished his career as a major general, "one of o
of only a few in British Army
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  #386  
Old 13th September 2018, 04:42
KerryD KerryD is offline
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I'm not sure but I think you might be talking about my father - Harry Dalton. He was Irish and married my Mum - an Australian nurse. We lived on the ship with him for a period. I realise this thread is old but I would really love to connect with people who may have sailed with my father. He passed away almost 30 years ago now and I would like to put together a bit of a history for my girls. Hope someone can help.
Thanks,
Kerry
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  #387  
Old 13th September 2018, 05:20
nickwilson89 nickwilson89 is offline  
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Hello Kerry,
It is always good to hear from the off spring of an old Jardineer. You must be the third in as many years. Your father's name is so familiar to me though I am sure we never sailed together in my time (1956-65) If you know the years he was in the company it might help and also any ships he may have mentioned as having sailed on. Yes, many young officers married Australian nurses. On the runs of those days the only white faces we saw were when on the Australia or NZ coast.and that sometimes only happened every couple of years or so. In the early 60s this led to men marrying Japanese or Chinese girls like me. Something I was clearly advised not to do at the time of my interview on joining the company a few years earlier.

I wish you luck in your search

Nic
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  #388  
Old 13th September 2018, 05:46
KerryD KerryD is offline
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Hi Nick,

The reference to my father was made in this thread #145 by Jon Elliot. Not really sure how to tag him so I have sent a private message. Thanks
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  #389  
Old 13th September 2018, 05:57
KerryD KerryD is offline
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Hi Mike,
I think you are talking about my father...did you know him well? I am looking to talk to people who might have sailed with him and also with my mum and I when we were on the ship with him.

Kerry
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  #390  
Old 13th September 2018, 16:03
Username Username is offline
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Originally Posted by KerryD View Post
Hi Mike,
I think you are talking about my father...did you know him well? I am looking to talk to people who might have sailed with him and also with my mum and I when we were on the ship with him.

Kerry
You found me, Kerry !
I'm travelling at the moment so not so easy to communicate; BUT; yes i sailed with your Dad; he was Chief Officer on the HANG SANG and i was a brand new 3rd Mate fresh from Cardiff and my 2nd Mates ticket.
He showed me the ropes, as I was a tanker man on my first cargo ship, and also introduced me to how things worked in Asia.
That was back in April/May/June 1966- he must have done a pretty good job on me because I am still in Asia today!

Unfortunately I never had the privilege of sailing with him again after that. I must speak very highly of your Dad, a fine gentleman and a first rate seaman.

Please em me at [email protected]

Best regards,
Jon
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  #391  
Old 13th September 2018, 16:49
nickwilson89 nickwilson89 is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Username View Post
You found me, Kerry !
I'm travelling at the moment so not so easy to communicate; BUT; yes i sailed with your Dad; he was Chief Officer on the HANG SANG and i was a brand new 3rd Mate fresh from Cardiff and my 2nd Mates ticket.
He showed me the ropes, as I was a tanker man on my first cargo ship, and also introduced me to how things worked in Asia.
That was back in April/May/June 1966- he must have done a pretty good job on me because I am still in Asia today!

Unfortunately I never had the privilege of sailing with him again after that. I must speak very highly of your Dad, a fine gentleman and a first rate seaman.

Please em me at [email protected]

Best regards,
Jon
Ahem! Forgive me , Jon,for being slightly flippant but as an ex deck officer who sailed on the Hang Sang, in 1959, 1961 -62,, and 1964-65 what exactly was there to learn on a clapped out old log carrier, run mainly by the long time bosun and even longer time No.! Comprador? Great, great days. Ring the bell, we can manage another round before lunch.
Nick
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  #392  
Old 13th September 2018, 22:44
seaman38 seaman38 is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nickwilson89 View Post
Ahem! Forgive me , Jon,for being slightly flippant but as an ex deck officer who sailed on the Hang Sang, in 1959, 1961 -62,, and 1964-65 what exactly was there to learn on a clapped out old log carrier, run mainly by the long time bosun and even longer time No.! Comprador? Great, great days. Ring the bell, we can manage another round before lunch.
Nick
I'm sure Username will answer in due time, but I found that it was on the old bangers (sailed on a few) you learnt a lot by having to improvise on all kinds of equipment both on deck and in the ER. From a navigation point of view they kept you on your toes, being slow thus affected by tidal flows/currents more and with unreliable M.E. kept your bowels loose in close quarter situations, two black balls permanently attached to an halliard, no we were not in the slave trade!
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  #393  
Old 13th September 2018, 23:16
KerryD KerryD is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeK View Post
Sailed with Mike a few times, once on the Aussie run when we carried the late Harry Dalton's new Australian wife up to HK as supernumerary on I think the Eastern Moon, Stan Little's Chinese wife was also on board that trip. Mike was Mate and me 2nd Mate.
Don't know where the 'Blossom' handle came from though

Mike
Hi,

I'm new to this site so I hope I have tagged this quote properly. I think you could be referring to my Mum (Judy) and Dad (Harry). Would love to hear back if that is true.
Thanks,
Kerry
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  #394  
Old 12th December 2018, 17:15
nickwilson89 nickwilson89 is offline  
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I ran across two good group photos in Gallery under the title Eastern Maid. They were submitted in 2015 by a friend of the late RWJ Raudon, in NZ and showed the officers of the E.Maid taken at Christmas 1959 (not 1960 as titled) and another group of officers on the Hopsang (not E.Maid as titled) at their Christmas dinner in B'kok in 1960.

I recognized many familiar faces but was confused because they all looked so young!

Nick
Hopsang 1957, 1961-62, 1964-65
E.Muse 1963-64 and 1965
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  #395  
Old 31st December 2018, 20:01
nickwilson89 nickwilson89 is offline  
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When you find yourself being propelled through your eighties at a faster and faster speed it dawns on you how many good books you never got around to reading. It was while feeling such a twinge of guilt that I started reading Joseph Conrad's 'Lord Jim' published in 1900. A bit of a struggle but in the first few pages I was rewarded with the author's view of officers who chose to serve on 'country ships' (i.e. not based on a home country port, e.g London, Hamburg, etc.)

I quote:

'The majority were men, who , like him, had remained as officers of 'country ships.They now had a horror of the home service , with its harder conditions, severer view of duty, and the hazard of stormy oceans. They were attuned to the eternal peace of Eastern sky and sea. They loved the short passages good deck chairs, large native crews and the distinction of being white. They shuddered at the thought of hard work, and led precariously easy lives, always on the verge of dismissal, always on the verge of engagement, serving Chinamen, Arabs and Half Castes (outside companies??)- would have served the devil himself had he made it easy enough. They talked endlessly of turns of luck; how so and so had got charge of a boat on the China coast and another doing well in Japan.......'

Anyone who served with Jardines after the war up until the time when they became yet another tramp company, should be nodding their head in agreement with Joseph Conrad's description. I certainly did

Nick
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  #396  
Old 12th June 2019, 22:19
nickwilson89 nickwilson89 is offline  
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Gee, things are slow when i see I was the last person to contribute something and that was six months ago. I hope it does not mean what I think it my mean, that is we are getting older and older.

This particular message comes after I read an old query from Gary Norton asking what became of the Australian engineer, John 'Slim' Caldwell?. When I was back working in HK 1992-95 the word was he was one of the LR surveyors in Korea. Very stale news I know.

Bob Tatz, c/e. 1952-59 has just had published an autobiography (1931-59) covering his war time childhood in HK and later his service with ICSN. Well worth a read and can be checked out through Amazon

Nick
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  #397  
Old 11th July 2019, 14:42
garryNorton garryNorton is offline
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Nick I see you refer to John 'Slim' Caldwell he was actually called Peter Caldwell.
He was my best man and lived in Sydney with his parents where we stopped on my wedding night and after the wedding we flew back to Melbourne to rejoin the Eastern Glory with my my wife Jean who traveled with us to Japan and back, my resignation went in to Indi-China on the voyage as people travelling from the Sydney agents only had to pay half fare where I had to pay full fare for my wife.I thought Indo_China did not want my custom so I went elsewhere.
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  #398  
Old 11th July 2019, 14:50
garryNorton garryNorton is offline
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My wife informs me that Peter's surname is Colwell and was 2nd Engineer of the Eastern Glory.
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  #399  
Old 11th July 2019, 17:26
nickwilson89 nickwilson89 is offline  
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Gary,

Good to hear from you and reassured to leearn you are still around! Thanks for setting me straight. I did two short trps on the Hewsang with Peter 2/e, in early 1963 and he came to our wedding in April.The reason why I remember him so well is that he appears as 'the third person' in a photo taken of Anna and I walking down the aisle of the church and it bugged me no end when I could never remember his surname. It is now firmly fixed in my memory thanks to you. I did not know him well but he always struck me as being the Qintessential Aussie, sort of along side Chips Rafferty!

All is well with us and we are now great grandparents. The wedding will be next summer, shortly after the boy's second birthday. Kids!!

Nick
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