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Blanchland - How Tramping Used To Be

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  #1  
Old 18th July 2012, 14:46
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Blanchland - How Tramping Used To Be

MV BLANCHLAND.

Owner; Stephenson Clarke.

8999.27 Grt – 4986.58 Nrt. – 12830 Dwt.
Off Number 302819.
B.H.P 6640.
Radio Callsign – GHQT.
Radio Station – MIMCO – Marconi.
Photos in my Gallery.



Voyage:

I joined the ship on the 8th October 1965 in Ellesmere Port for a coastal trip. She had just returned from a 12 plus month trip. Arrived from I seem to recall Dalhousie in Canada, loaded with paper and timber.

After Ellesmere we headed out to Ijmuiden to discharge timber and paper at a large paper mill. We were entertained by one of the Engineers from the plant and given a tour around the mill. Also we were taken to Amsterdam and entertained in various clubs. At this time it was discovered that the ship had lost a large number of plates from her rudder and there was not much left to steer the ship. Amazing she made the run back over the Atlantic. We were taken to DD and the rudder was re-plated. Interesting experience as it was a floating dock. From there we went to Rouen and then back to Sunderland. I signed off on the 29th October 1965. At this time I had decided that I would like to take the ship deep-sea. Marconi were delighted as they
did not have to worry about finding a replacement RO. So I was on leave again and headed home for a few days. Re-signed articles on the 11th November 1965. At this time we were in DD in Sunderland.
Unfortunately I did not keep a diary so I cannot give dates when we arrived or sailed from the ports but we did have a lot of port time as was normal then.

Sailed light ship from Sunderland into a full North Sea gale which was not ideal on the ship, as light she had practically no fore draft as she was all aft and tended to ride deep astern and nearly have the bow out of the water. Great for pounding. However in the whole trip we were only light for a couple of sea passages.
It was so rough that we took the pilot round to Dover.

We were bound for New Orleans to load grain on a World Food charter for discharge somewhere out east. At that time the destination was unknown but if turned out it was India.
Loaded full cargo New Orleans and headed across the Atlantic for Suez and on to Visakhapatnam and Calcutta.
Back loaded in Calcutta with part cargo of iron ore and departed for Kakinada to complete with Iron Ore.
Kakinada - Singapore for bunkers to Japan.
Yokohama - discharged then we were fortunate and our next charter was a Mitsui OSK general cargo - round the world trip.
Loaded at many ports in Japan the order of which has left me but it was probably something like this.
Yokohama
Kobe
Nagoya.
Moji/Shiminoseki.
Nagasaki.
Yokohama.
Possibly another which has slipped my mind.
Yokohama
Singapore
Tanjong Mani/Sarawak – Sejingkat/Kuching – Timber.
Penang
Bombay
Port Sudan
Suez
Casablanca
New York
Newhaven
Providence
Norfolk
Charleston
New Orleans
Baton Rouge
Lake Charles
Port Arthur
Houston
Panama
Japan various discharge ports.

Japan - Noumea – New Caledonia to load Nickel ore for Japan.
Japan
Takayama – Hit by a typhoon here but we were too late to sail so had every wire rope and the ships cat out to hopefully keep the ship safe. Luckily all went OK.

Japan to BC light ship – luckily with a following sea so we flew across.
Port New Westminster Canada
Port Moody – Sulphur, part cargo.
Victoria
Port Alberni
Tahsis

All the BC ports other then Port Moody were timber in various forms. Full deck cargo of timber. Really just a giant match stick.

Panama
Liverpool

I signed off 24th November 1966.

Marconi wanted me to take the ship out again after discharge but I declined. I wish I had but at the time I thought otherwise.

Now they complain about a few months!
Sorry I cannot remember the dates we arrived or left these ports but we certainly had lots of port time. Cargoes as I remember them.

Hawkey01

Last edited by hawkey01; 26th December 2015 at 11:00..
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  #2  
Old 18th July 2012, 16:15
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Ray Mac Ray Mac is offline  
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Was Peter Cullerton Ch.Stwd on her at that time.?
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  #3  
Old 18th July 2012, 18:04
Davie M Davie M is offline  
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Hi Hawkey, The dates are not important to me its the experience that still lingers.
Davie

Last edited by Davie M; 18th July 2012 at 18:06..
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  #4  
Old 19th July 2012, 10:50
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Bt,

sorry I cannot remember the Ch Stwd's name. My memory of him is a smallish slightly rotund man with thinning hair.

Hawkey01
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  #5  
Old 20th July 2012, 00:16
Les Gibson Les Gibson is offline  
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When I was 'lecky on the Blanchland for 8 months from late '64 to mid '65 The chief steward was John Lee from Cleadon. One of the best feeders I had ever been on. Silver service in the saloon with a white crew! Great days on one of the original 'Geordie tramps'. Paid off in Adelaide with acute appendicitis or would have stayed 'til Hawkeye joined in October '65. Chief was Tom Lyons, Second eng. Bev Gardner. 3rd Billy Rowstron (Went 2nd next trip) OM was Ian Borthwick Had a bit of a nightmare with the Clarke Chapman AC winches with pole changing motors but Bill Rowstron was seconded to work with me most of the time and we managed without too much trouble. Main engine was a problem, only the second P type Doxford built and fell apart at regular intervals. Going 99 clump quite frequently.
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  #6  
Old 20th July 2012, 02:26
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Pat McCardle Pat McCardle is offline  
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[QUOTE=hawkey01;608438]MV BLANCHLAND.


Now they complain about a few months!

You can make that weeks now!!
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  #7  
Old 20th July 2012, 02:36
John Dryden John Dryden is offline  
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Memory

Quote:
Originally Posted by hawkey01 View Post
Bt,

sorry I cannot remember the Ch Stwd's name. My memory of him is a smallish slightly rotund man with thinning hair.

Hawkey01
You have done well to remenber your own name after a trip like like that
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  #8  
Old 20th July 2012, 07:45
BillH BillH is offline
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BLANCHLAND (1961 - 1968)
O.N. 302819. 8,999g. 4,987n. 12,400d. 478’ 7” x 62’ 3” x 29’ 7”
4-cyl. 2 S.C.S.A. (670 x 2,100mm) by Wm. Doxford and Sons (Engineers) Ltd., Sunderland. 6,640 BHP. 15 knots.
31.10.1960: Keel laid by William Gray and Co. Ltd., West Hartlepool (Yard No.1303).
29.6.1961: Launched.
2.11.1961: Completed for Stephenson Clarke Ltd.
1.4.1968: Owners renamed Stephenson Clarke Shipping Ltd.
1968: Sold to Astro Acorde Cia Nav. S.A., Greece and renamed EUGENIA M.
1982: Sold to Ionian Maritime Enterprises SA, Panama and renamed IONIAN PRINCESS.
8.1985: Damaged by explosion.
1.1986: Arrived at Qinhuangdao for demolition.
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  #9  
Old 20th July 2012, 13:29
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Thanks Billh for info.

Les, I did hear from Bill Rowstron on SN sometime ago and he if my memory serves me correctly lives somewhere in the Pacific Islands. Had a very interesting life after Blanchland. Have searched my PM's but must have lost his ID. I sailed with Capt Borthwick who was skipper when she arrived back from the previous trip which you must have been on. The engine must have had a good talking to as it, only let us down on the odd occasion.

Bill's ID is his name. He has not been active on site since 2010. Lives in Australia.

Neville - Hawkey01
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  #10  
Old 20th July 2012, 22:27
Les Gibson Les Gibson is offline  
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Nev,
Good to hear from you again. The main engine had been giving us all kinds of problems on a voyage from Pimentel in Peru with sugar for Auckland. We spent about 6 weeks in Auckland with four or five Doxford engineers flown out from Sunderland, The found out that the shaft was actually out of alignment and after putting this right she apparently behaved quite well as you note. Not long after this I was in hospital in Adelaide so didn't really have the opportunity to see whether the Doxford men had done the trick or not. However, I believe the Blanchland was broken up following massive damage to the main engine?
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  #11  
Old 18th December 2012, 10:52
a.wallace a.wallace is offline
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A ship with no rudder

I joined Blanchland as a 16 year old boy in Ellesmere Port for that trip.At the shipping federation office I was given instructions about joining the ship and told that the replacement crew would also be travelling down on the train.I asked how to recognise them and was told not to worry I would have no problems there.7.0am the next morning,standing on 1 of Central stations platforms ,I saw the lads walking down lugging cases of Newcastle Brown ale. Easy to spot the crew.After spending 3 weeks 1 weekend in Ellesmere port (I didnt like the place alot)we left and I thought the place we went to was Velsen North where I remember the bosun became very attached to a local young lady and a few other ladies were removed by the police.The older hands reckoned this was OK because we were about to leave anyway.(Thoughtful souls).From the floating drydock near Amsterdam,fully ruddered up again,we left for a short stop in Antwerp and then onto Rouen.The passage up the river I remember was very scenic and Rouen was aswell.After that it was on to Sunderland and a move to one of Tyne Tees shipping vessels.
All in all the experience on Blanchland was memorable.It must have been because after almost 50 years its still fresh in my mind.



Voyage:

I joined the ship on the 8th October 1965 in Ellesmere Port for a coastal trip. She had just returned from a 12 plus month trip. Arrived from I seem to recall Dalhousie in Canada, loaded with paper and timber.

After Ellesmere we headed out to Ijmuiden to discharge timber and paper at a large paper mill. We were entertained by one of the Engineers from the plant and given a tour around the mill. Also we were taken to Amsterdam and entertained in various clubs. At this time it was discovered that the ship had lost a large number of plates from her rudder and there was not much left to steer the ship. Amazing she made the run back over the Atlantic. We were taken to DD and the rudder was re-plated. Interesting experience as it was a floating dock. From there we went to Rouen and then back to Sunderland. I signed off on the 29th October 1965. At this time I had decided that I would like to take the ship deep-sea. Marconi were delighted as they
did not have to worry about finding a replacement RO. So I was on leave again and headed home for a few days. Re-signed articles on the 11th November 1965. At this time we were in DD in Sunderland.
Unfortunately I did not keep a dairy so I cannot give dates when we arrived or sailed from the ports but we did have a lot of port time as was normal then.

Sailed light ship from Sunderland into a full North Sea gale which was not ideal on the ship, as light she had practically no fore draft as she was all aft and tended to ride deep astern and nearly have the bow out of the water. Great for pounding. However in the whole trip we were only light for a couple of sea passages.
It was so rough that we took the pilot round to Dover.

We were bound for New Orleans to load grain on a World Food charter for discharge somewhere out east. At that time the destination was unknown but if turned out it was India.
Loaded full cargo New Orleans and headed across the Atlantic for Suez and on to Visakhapatnam and Calcutta.
Back loaded in Calcutta with part cargo of coal and departed for Kakinada to complete with Iron Ore.
Kakinada - Singapore for bunkers to Japan.
Yokohama - discharged then we were fortunate and our next charter was a Mitsui OSK general cargo - round the world trip.
Loaded at many ports in Japan the order of which has left me but it was probably something like this.
Yokohama
Kobe
Nagoya.
Moji/Shiminoseki.
Nagasaki.
Yokohama.
Possibly another which has slipped my mind.
Yokohama
Singapore
Tanjong Mani/Sarawak Sejingkat/Kuching Timber.
Penang
Bombay
Port Sudan
Suez
Casablanca
New York
Newhaven
Providence
Norfolk
Charleston
New Orleans
Mobile
Lake Charles
Port Arthur
Houston
Panama
Japan various discharge ports.

Japan - Noumea New Caledonia to load Nickel ore for Japan.
Japan
Takayama Hit by a typhoon here but we were too late to sail so had every wire rope and the ships cat out to hopefully keep the ship safe. Luckily all went OK.

Japan to BC light ship luckily with a following sea so we flew across.
Port New Westminster Canada
Port Moody Sulphur, part cargo.
Victoria
Port Alberni
Tahsis

All the BC ports other then Port Moody were timber in various forms. Full deck cargo of timber. Really just a giant match stick.

Panama
Liverpool

I signed off 24th November 1966.

Marconi wanted me to take the ship out again after discharge but I declined. I wish I had but at the time I thought otherwise.

Now they complain about a few months!
Sorry I cannot remember the dates we arrived our left these ports but we certainly had lots of port time. Cargoes as I remember them.

Hawkey01[/QUOTE]
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  #12  
Old 18th December 2012, 16:05
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A.Wallace,

I had forgotten the Antwerp call. As you say the run up the Seine to Rouen was certainly very picturesque. I did not until then realise how big a river it was! Then of course we later visited the Mississippi, now that is big.
You would have really enjoy the next voyage, a great crowd. The bosun I am sure was by birth Polish. I played many many games of chess with him. He had a brother in the SAS in Borneo. Now there is another story.

Hawkey01
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  #13  
Old 19th December 2012, 20:17
a.wallace a.wallace is offline
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Previous trip

My first trip away from home was on one of Runcimans ships the 'Hazelmoor'.We left the Tyne at the beginning of January the same year and went down to Mar del Plata,Argentina,and then up to BA.Unfortunately with the police there at the time a young local was shot just the week we arrived in Mar del Plata trying to leave the dock area over the fence.It was back up to Marseille then on to Cuba,Japan,Australia the back thro the Red Sea and back to the Tyne.All told about 10 months.A fine introduction into sea sickness.After a couple of trips,including Blanchland,I left the MN having met my future wife.Finishing an apprenticeship with the NCB we later went to South Africa for 14 years.A most memorable time from leave school even up to now.
Many thanks for your memories.It certainly takes you back.Im sure your right I would have loved going out with Blanchland. BFN

I had forgotten the Antwerp call. As you say the run up the Seine to Rouen was certainly very picturesque. I did not until then realise how big a river it was! Then of course we later visited the Mississippi, now that is big.
You would have really enjoy the next voyage, a great crowd. The bosun I am sure was by birth Polish. I played many many games of chess with him. He had a brother in the SAS in Borneo. Now there is another story.

Hawkey01[/QUOTE]
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  #14  
Old 19th December 2012, 23:25
ted harrison ted harrison is offline  
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A good thread, thanks to all contributors. I notice in one of the photo captions it is stated her Doxford was a 670PT4 rated at 6640bhp. A 4cyl would normally be 4400bhp unless turbo charged. Am I right in thinking the PT is an early 'P' Type? If so did all the 'P' types achieve the circa 50% increase in power? Also, did the 'J' types have similar output per cylinder?
Whilst refering to Turbo Charging, I read on one S.N. thread, a reference to 3 cylinder Doxfords being Turbo Charged. My only experience of TC Doxfords were on 6 cyl types. Would much appreciate being put right on these couple of points.
Regards
Ted Harrison
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  #15  
Old 11th May 2015, 18:39
dereksships dereksships is offline  
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hi im derek , was EDH on the same trip , joined Elsmere port , home trade articles , then deep sea articles in Sunderland , after leaving dry dock there . I think the port you left out in japan was fushiki , had a big storm , there , was good trip though . apart from first mate going mad and leaving , electrician also left , had to get knee op . remember Noumea well me and vic (Australian ab ) caught a shark
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  #16  
Old 13th May 2015, 15:58
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Derek,

welcome to SN. Good to have another ex crew member from the Blanchland aboard.
It was an amazing period for me and I am sure for you as well. I have attached a link to photo in my Gallery - are you one of these men. Also quite a few photos of the ship and crew. Just search in the Gallery - Keyword - Blanchland and username - Hawkey01 - and they will all come up.
It was the 2nd Mate who had problems after being pistol whipped in a bar in NewYork/Newark. Had large lump on his head and I think we put him off in Japan. Lecky fell off the winch house and damaged back - refused to be hospitalised in Port Sudan but he eventually taken off in Casablanca. Picture of the new lecky on the bridge wing. Terrible but some of the names have gone now. I should remember the first lecky as we kept in touch for a long time after the Blanchland and I visited him down in Bournemouth area.
Aussie AB - Victor Maclagland - nephew - I think of the movie star of the same name. A hard man he was too. Seem to remember a tattoo in a very tender area.
Bosun - Polish by birth - used to play chess with him. Fantastic memories.
Ah! the shark cant remember if it was winched aboard using the stern winch or was that another ship or did it break the massive hook made by the engrs.
Also Bill Rowstron 2nd Eng catching some sea monster off Visakhapatnam.

https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/galler...-crew-/cat/504

Neville - Sparky.

Last edited by hawkey01; 26th December 2015 at 10:57..
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  #17  
Old 13th May 2015, 23:07
tsell tsell is offline
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Hi Neville, I just found your thread and enjoyed the memories. The engineering problems Les mentioned in post #10 were similar to the troubles we faced in Bahia Blanca, to which I refer in the first chapter of my story about that trip.
In our case though, there was a memorable serious physical fight between the ship and shore based engineers. I don't know if they were flown from the UK or elsewhere, but the parts were and as I recall there were major problems in fitting them, hence the weeks we spent in port, to the enjoyment of many of the crew.
I have given a description of this for posting in a subsequent chapter.
Cheers
Taff
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  #18  
Old 14th May 2015, 07:48
dereksships dereksships is offline  
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just remembered it was not Andy , but jimmy Blair in the photo , another thing I recall is a AB from Scotland getting married in new Orleans , he then deserted us in hongkong , never did hear what became of him .
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Old 14th May 2015, 10:30
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dereksships View Post
just remembered it was not Andy , but jimmy Blair in the photo , another thing I recall is a AB from Scotland getting married in new Orleans , he then deserted us in hongkong , never did hear what became of him .
Sounds like a GTX High Performer but at least he must have passed his Wassermann's Test.

John T
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  #20  
Old 19th May 2015, 08:49
Laurie Ridyard Laurie Ridyard is offline  
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I did not know ROs kept dairies. Who supplied the cows? Marconi?
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  #21  
Old 25th December 2015, 18:05
terry123 terry123 is offline  
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hi iam new at this my name terry oldfield,I was on the blanchland nov 65 til 67,
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  #22  
Old 25th December 2015, 19:49
dereksships dereksships is offline  
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blanchland

hi terry were you the messman
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  #23  
Old 26th December 2015, 11:03
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Morning Terry,

afraid your name does not ring a bell. Glad to have you aboard and would welcome any memories you have of your time on Blanchland.

Neville - Hawkey01
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  #24  
Old 26th December 2015, 11:44
dereksships dereksships is offline  
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3rd mate

hi its derek here , just noticed pic of LEE deck apprentice who got made up to third ,i bought a reel to reel tape n japan , and LEE loand me his record player and all his records to putbon my tapes , used them tapes for years , mind there was some good music about in those days, music thats still getting played these days , was good to see that pic of myself with you and blair in new westminster
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  #25  
Old 27th December 2015, 20:40
terry123 terry123 is offline  
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Hi Derek,yes I was the messman on that trip,I meet you in Fremantle in 1964,i was on a B P Tanker on the Australia coast.
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