Derbyshire - Page 43 - Ships Nostalgia
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  #1051  
Old 24th January 2017, 16:50
Peter Cheseldine Peter Cheseldine is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thobshropshire View Post
This class of vessel had a cargo control room all the ballast pumping was controlled from there.
Remotely operated valves were hydraulic I seem to recall.
Regards
Tyne Bridge
Dobie McKinnes valves and controls. Valve actuators on deck regularly jammed due in ingress of iron ore dust "Weather sealed and require no maintenance" according to the manufacturer.
An hydraulic oil back flow also caused a slop valve to open during emergency ballasting off Wakyama. Resulting in oily water in number 8 hold (if I remember correctly). It was assumed that a spark created by movement of the hatch cover which resulted in both hatch covers disappearing overboard. Luckily no serious injuries.
Somehow I managed to survive six terms of service on this vessel.
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  #1052  
Old 24th January 2017, 17:08
Peter Cheseldine Peter Cheseldine is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Cheseldine View Post
Tyne Bridge
Dobie McKinnes valves and controls. Valve actuators on deck regularly jammed due in ingress of iron ore dust "Weather sealed and require no maintenance" according to the manufacturer.
An hydraulic oil back flow also caused a slop valve to open during emergency ballasting off Wakyama. Resulting in oily water in number 8 hold (if I remember correctly). It was assumed that a spark created by movement of the hatch cover which resulted in both hatch covers disappearing overboard. Luckily no serious injuries.
Somehow I managed to survive six terms of service on this vessel.
Apologies. No 9 hold not 8 as stared
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  #1053  
Old 24th January 2017, 19:36
tiachapman tiachapman is offline  
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YES DEAD RIGHT COFFIN CLASS, worked on them as a shipwright in the Furness yard threw together.
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  #1054  
Old 2nd February 2017, 12:24
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jmcg jmcg is offline
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Tiachapman

Was there no quality control or effective management policies/procedures in those days/yards?

BW

J
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  #1055  
Old 2nd February 2017, 15:50
Peter Cheseldine Peter Cheseldine is offline  
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I have posted a couple of thumbnails of Tyne Bridge, on the tanker thread under "whatever happened to Huntings."
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  #1056  
Old 9th September 2017, 11:23
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jmcg jmcg is offline
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As the years roll on and at times memory fades let us all remember this day in 1980 when 44 of our seafaring colleagues perished to the deep with the loss of Bibby's M.V. Derbyshire.

They have no graves but the sea.

Let us always remember them.

Never forgotten.

J
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  #1057  
Old 9th September 2017, 12:03
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Frank P Frank P is offline  
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R.i.p.
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  #1058  
Old 9th September 2017, 12:08
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Erimus Erimus is offline  
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Good grief....that far back?? Seems more recent than that but like Piper Alpha images stay with us in the business..

Indeed RIP those 44 lost souls.

geoff
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  #1059  
Old 9th September 2017, 12:58
slick slick is offline  
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All,
Alittle help please, somewhere a while agoI read through the Crew List.
I see the name of the Chief Officer was given as Bayliss.
I sailed with a chap called "Curly" Bayliss in the RFA is he the one?
My apologies in advance if I am being a bit clumsy.

Yours aye,

slick
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  #1060  
Old 9th September 2017, 13:03
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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A sad day. You could see her taking shape (as Liverpool Bridge) at Haverton Hill from the top floor of Binns department store in Middlesbrough. A curiosity then with no idea of her future.

John T
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  #1061  
Old 9th September 2017, 13:07
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slick View Post
All,
Alittle help please, somewhere a while agoI read through the Crew List.
I see the name of the Chief Officer was given as Bayliss.
I sailed with a chap called "Curly" Bayliss in the RFA is he the one?
My apologies in advance if I am being a bit clumsy.

Yours aye,

slick
Slick, According to http://www.wrecksite.eu/wreck.aspx?202709 "Culry Bayliss" was the master.

John T
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  #1062  
Old 9th September 2017, 14:26
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jmcg jmcg is offline
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Curly was indeed Chief Officer

Captain was Geoff Underhill - he was our C/O on her sister English Bridge. A fine seaman.

Sailed with 5 others who perished on Derbyshire.

Full crew list below:-
The 44 people lost on board MV Derbyshire, including 42 crew and 2 of their wives, were:
Kevin Allis (junior engineer)
Francis Arthur Bayliss (chief officer)
Philip Joseph Best (steward)
Paul John Bindon (extra 2nd officer)
Thomas Victor Blease (PO)
Richard Bond (PO)
Terence Brown (GP1)
William Buckley (purser CO)
Ali Bin Bujang (GP1)
Timothy Burke (GP1)
Nigel Coates (GP1)
Leo Thomas Mackenzie Coltman (3rd engineer)
Frederick James Chedotal (electrician)
John James Crone (2nd steward)
Mark Freeman (junior catering rating)
Andrew Gordon (steward)
Alexander Turner Gordon (steward)
Joseph Henry Graham (2nd cook)
John James Greenland (steward)
Barry James Hardman (chief cook)
Anthony Jack Hodges (CPO)
William Leonard Hunt (4th engineer)
Graham Hutchinson (extra 3rd engineer)
Annemarie Hutchinson (wife of Graham Hutchinson)
David Hugh Jones (2nd engineer)
Mary Jones (wife of David H Jones)
Norman Gibson Aiken Kane (GP1)
Paul Desmond King (junior engineer)
Peter Lambert (GP1)
Bernard Langton (GP2)
Norman Marsh (chief engineer)
Ali Bin Haji Musa (GP1)
Ronnie Musa (GP1)
James Noblett (GP1)
Clive William Rapley (extra CO)
David Michael Ridyard (extra 4th engineer)
Badarun Bin Sekah (GP1)
Adrian Keith Stott (junior seaman)
Peter John Taylor (PO)
Raymond William Taylor (2nd officer)
Geoffrey Victor Underhill (master)
Royal Alfred Waller (radio officer)
Griffith Wyn Williams (GP1)
Edward Frank Williamson (junior engineer)


J
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  #1063  
Old 9th September 2017, 18:28
New Haven Neil New Haven Neil is offline  
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Always a hard day - Paul King went instead of me....the ship was late and I went to another, I was supposed to be on her then. :-(
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  #1064  
Old 12th September 2017, 20:27
twin twin is offline  
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greeting from canada
i was on the dock when the Derbyshire left sept iles for japan
i was working for iron ore company of canada at that time and i was use to go several time on the loading berth to Watch the loading
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  #1065  
Old 22nd September 2017, 16:22
NJR NJR is offline
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NJR.
Just finished reading "the Shipwreck Hunter" by David Means.
A fascinating book which features much detail of the "Derbyshire" incident.
Caught my attention as I sailed on the old "Derbyshire" in the sixties.
Life was much more interesting in those days!
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  #1066  
Old 23rd September 2017, 08:03
Winmar Winmar is offline  
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Titanic and the Herald of Free Enterprise gets talked about frequently but this was equally as grim and sad as either of those! 42 seamen and two lasses wanting to spend some time with their men taken in the blink of an eye. I think about this one a lot. May they all rest in peace.
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  #1067  
Old 23rd September 2017, 11:39
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5036 5036 is offline  
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Apologies if this has been referred to before, but it is chilling.
RIP.


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  #1068  
Old 24th September 2017, 15:35
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jmcg jmcg is offline
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I remain somewhat ill at ease with the final reports, particularly so when there is have been no reasons advanced as to why she remained silent for so long under these worsening conditions.

j
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  #1069  
Old 9th April 2018, 01:05
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DrHannibalLedford DrHannibalLedford is offline  
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I remember when this happened. I was just a kid at the time but I remember being shocked since Derbyshire was such a huge ship. I remember her discovery as well. So sad. RIP Derbyshire crew and wives!
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  #1070  
Old 9th April 2018, 13:11
tsell tsell is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nav View Post
Apologies if this has been referred to before, but it is chilling.
RIP.


https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=9tN4xROtMjI
Nav, thank you for posting the video. Two things I learned that I was previously unaware of: The diving suit technology (as a former recreational diver, I can appreciate the risks that occupant took); and for the first time, I was made aware that there are six thousand wrecks below the cold waters of the Great Lakes. I am staggered at that revelation as I think about the hundreds of lives that were lost.

Taff
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  #1071  
Old 9th April 2018, 16:15
Barrie Youde Barrie Youde is offline  
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#1005

A most dramatic video.

I have not read the reports in their entirety. In my ignorance, I wonder when it was first realised that they had water ingress below deck?

Only when it was too late to attempt to turn and run before the sea, by the look of the reconstruction.

A tragedy indeed.

Last edited by Barrie Youde; 9th April 2018 at 16:20..
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  #1072  
Old 9th April 2018, 23:40
KEITHMAR KEITHMAR is offline  
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Barrie, She apparently sank very quickly ,to turn such a large vessel , once The Master realised what was happening , (Even if He did ? ) would, in My opinion, have been impossible! Entirely Agree A tragedy indeed.
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  #1073  
Old 9th April 2018, 23:54
Barrie Youde Barrie Youde is offline  
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Thank you, Keith.

I quite agree. To turn in those conditions, even in the best of trim, would not have been easy; so there cannot have been much time available to take any action.
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  #1074  
Old 15th May 2018, 21:26
john nichols john nichols is offline
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I too served one voyage on the Glen in 1985 as Chief Officer. By that time Bulkhead 65 beam knees had been strengthened but one of my weekly jobs was to crawl through the space to check for signs of further cracks developing. My first inspection revealed some additional slight cracking. I marked the extremity of the cracks with a felt tip pen but the cracks did not develop further during my time there.
However, one day in the focsle head store area I found a huge split in one of the two hawse pipes. Worryingly, this split had not occurred at a welded seam but was in fact a split down the centre of one of the plates, it was about 4 feet long and approx 1/2 wide. This defect was reported to the owners and I believe note was made of the problem for the Derbyshire inquiry. Who knows, perhaps Derbyshire had a similar defect which contributed to the focsle filling with sea water
JN
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  #1075  
Old 15th June 2018, 05:33
uncle Ray uncle Ray is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quietman View Post
I sailed on the Tyne Bridge before the Derbyshire disaster happened,even then the class of ship had various problems.On the tyne bridge you couldnt even stand on theplatforms to operate the winches as one crew member fell through and injured his leg badly due to rust
I was on the Tynebridge from 1975 to 76, I joined her in Finland and was butterworthing the tanks / hatches to change over to dry cargo we were just off the top of Scotland on our way to the US when a fire broke out in the pump room , all the Co2 on the ship ( 162 bottles ) was set off into the pump room and dowsed the fire, we sailed on to Newport News with no fire fighting system. a couple of trips before I joined her she had an explosion in Tokyo Bay and lost no 9 hatch lids and the trip before that she hit an Iceberg and holed the bulbous bow, this was filled with concrete in Canada. She did have cracks we used to monitor them weekly and when in port a team of welders were brought in to weld them up. Happy days
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