The Japanese miracle weapon in WWII - Ships Nostalgia
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The Japanese miracle weapon in WWII

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  #1  
Old 20th March 2016, 14:47
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The Japanese miracle weapon in WWII

Here is an interesting discussion I stumbled upon (well, I think it's interesting -- particularly the comments!).

http://nationalinterest.org/feature/...-15541?ref=yfp
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Old 20th March 2016, 17:47
Dartskipper Dartskipper is offline  
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Japanese eyesight won the War eh? Don't suppose they might just possibly had some excellent binoculars made by Minolta?


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Old 20th March 2016, 19:58
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I always understood that Asian eyesight was generally poorer than Western eyesight, blamed on the rice diet, BUT that may have encouraged the development of excellent optical aids.
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Old 20th March 2016, 20:57
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I think that maybe the Imperial Japanese Navy had the benefit of some excellent products from Nikon and Topcon:

They were allegedly so good that at least one American Admiral is said to have turned town the proffered Samurai sword and asked for a pair of these instead.
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Old 20th March 2016, 21:23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duncan112 View Post
I always understood that Asian eyesight was generally poorer than Western eyesight, blamed on the rice diet, BUT that may have encouraged the development of excellent optical aids.
This is an urban myth. Asian eyes might be less than Western ones on the vertical axis, but larger on the horizontal axis. Therefore, the total light collecting area is likely to be the same. Also, Tokyo was one hour ahead of Washington in the international time zones and, therefore, got to launch their torpedoes an hour before the US forces knew they were there. A torpedo traveling at 45 knots can go a long way in an hour, even cruising when it runs out of fuel.

I offer this in the advancement of science.
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Old 20th March 2016, 21:59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ART6 View Post
This is an urban myth. Asian eyes might be less than Western ones on the vertical axis, but larger on the horizontal axis. Therefore, the total light collecting area is likely to be the same. Also, Tokyo was one hour ahead of Washington in the international time zones and, therefore, got to launch their torpedoes an hour before the US forces knew they were there. A torpedo traveling at 45 knots can go a long way in an hour, even cruising when it runs out of fuel.

I offer this in the advancement of science.
I see, (he said with his eyes shut), so if the Japanese lookouts laid on their side, they would find American binoculars just as effective?
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Old 21st March 2016, 00:05
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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As far as I know, Japanese eyes are the same as everyone else's, it's the eyelids that are different.

However, can anybody comment on the ability of Japanese girls to blow raspberries when sliding down bannisters?

John T
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Old 21st March 2016, 09:41
John Cassels John Cassels is offline  
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You are quite correct John , it's the eyelid operation that makes the difference.
Japanese eyelids open and shut at a greater frequency than American and gave rise the the famous Ray Spruance quote "there's that blinking Jap again ".

The raspberry is a matter of a pinion .
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Old 21st March 2016, 11:07
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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You are quite correct John , it's the eyelid operation that makes the difference.
Japanese eyelids open and shut at a greater frequency than American and gave rise the the famous Ray Spruance quote "there's that blinking Jap again ".

The raspberry is a matter of a pinion .
Ha ha. Good one John. That pinion sounds painful, it would have anyone screaming like a Banzai.

Glad I just stuck to the temples and electric wireless shops. If you've seen one mushi mushi you've seen 'em all.

John T
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Old 21st March 2016, 16:46
Robert Bush Robert Bush is offline  
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Art 6,
I also found the article very interesting, and going back to the battle of Jutland where there was only one effective torpedo attack have this story.

My father was an era Engine Room Artificer during this battle on HMS Marlborough struck in the engineroom by a torpedo. I asked him whwat it was like in there, he said, 'It was not very nice." The official report said that two men were killed and several wounded.

The German gun fire was most effective in this battle and it has been said the this was partly due to their excellent Zeis optical range finders and their operators.

As a cable ship navigator in the 1950s I had to use Bar and Stroud optical range fineders and remember how they were a great strain on my eyes. Thank goodness for Radar.
Best
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Old 22nd March 2016, 20:50
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This is the Japanese torpedo known as Long Lance to the Allies. It can be seen at the IWM Duxford.

Roy.
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Old 23rd March 2016, 16:34
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I thought the Japanese miracle weapon was the kamikaze plane.
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Old 23rd March 2016, 17:05
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Kamikaze - 'Divine wind', from the wind which destroyed a Mongol invasion fleet in the 13th century.

Kaiten - 'Return to heaven' - Manned torpedoes.

Shinyo - 'Sea quake' - small fast motorboats, also loaded with explosives.

Also there were divers carrying explosive charges, not to 'place and withdraw' but to place themselves and detonate - less sophisticated than a limpet mine used by everyone else, but just as effective.

They really developed the suicide bomber concept - Others now follow.
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Old 23rd March 2016, 19:22
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Germany were considering making the V1 flying bomb into a piloted suicide weapon, the Reichenberg IV, to be used against Allied shipping. The test pilot Hannah Reitsch nearly lost her life testing the concept. However, it appears that the scheme was put into action, and a number of pilots were trained to fly the weapon. While training was nearing completion, and plans made to start attacking Allied ships and warships, the Allies scuppered the programme by inconveniently landing troops on Normandy beaches on 6th June 1944. As the situation was deteriorating rapidly, enthusiasm for suicide bombing faded away. A suggestion was put forward to use battle weary FW190's as suicide weapons on the Eastern Front, but it was refused by German High Command. (Himself.)

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