Female Radio Officers - Page 7 - Ships Nostalgia
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  #151  
Old 3rd September 2019, 05:19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephen J. Card View Post
Dallas Bradshaw.
Merchant Navy's first woman radio officer. Jr. R/O. Joined DUNCRAIG 19 August, 1970. Canadian from Victoria BC. She was a former Photographer and journalist.
Was she on the Scotstoun summer/fall 1971?
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  #152  
Old 3rd September 2019, 08:45
Laurie Ridyard Laurie Ridyard is offline  
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I sailed with a female R/O in 1975. She and her BF the C/O were a pair of Scottish peese artistes

She would get drunk, pick an argument with her BF , then start crying, Apparently she wanted to get hitched but he didn't.

ATB

Laurie
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  #153  
Old 3rd September 2019, 09:30
Winmar Winmar is offline  
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I and probably others Laurie, find it very distasteful that you find it necessary to blight a young ladies character by referring to her as a Peese Artiste or piss artist on a web site. The Merchant Navy of old being what it was, I doubt very much wether there are any of us whose activities would stand very much scrutiny over the years, myself included. I think that you should revert to the old adage, what happens in ***** stays in *****I! It would be kinder and a bit more diplomatic! Just an opinion mind you!
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  #154  
Old 3rd September 2019, 09:33
BOB87 BOB87 is offline
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Hi Laurie, I never actually sailed with the female R/O I mentioned,..Dallas,..she was the First in the MN I believe, and she was from the far side of the pond,.. (Canada in fact as Stephen says ). I believe she was the first in Marconi too,.. maybe that opened the floodgates for more to follow. And why not?...But I never met, either in the flesh or on the airwaves, another female R/O;... Coast Stations yes,..Isafordhur radio, TFZ,..lovely people. They gave me an Icelandic phrasebook so my routine R/T msg's to them , in the wee small hours, could be passed in "Icelandic",..lol..We were on a 5 month patrol, supporting the UK fishing fleet, (and others), and working with Icelandic Coastguard......Happy memories.

Last edited by BOB87; 3rd September 2019 at 10:21.. Reason: additional info
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  #155  
Old 3rd September 2019, 10:06
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Sailed with the second. Alice Millison in AVON BRIDGE, 1972. Next to join was Joan Wareing and she was in EDEN BRIDGE. I guess the flood gates opened then. Shelia Edmundson joined J&J as the first Nav Cadet in 1970 and she was first in the Merch. Ch Eng? Well that goes back to the 1930s with Victoria Drummond in Blue Funnel. Why not any female catering officers? Must be by now.
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  #156  
Old 3rd September 2019, 10:48
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Perhaps the original dual certification Stephen. Dallas was drawing pints at the Imperial in Colwyn Bay when I was at the Wireless College.
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  #157  
Old 3rd September 2019, 14:31
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Perhaps the original dual certification Stephen. Dallas was drawing pints at the Imperial in Colwyn Bay when I was at the Wireless College.


Notes in Denholm News Autumn 1970.

Dallas left home five years before to spend two and half years at Colwyn Bay Radio College and then waited 22 months to find a job.

I still have this Denholm News issue. I had joined Naess Pioneer six weeks before Dallas joined. Those good old 'News' were good for the crew list.

Stephen
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  #158  
Old 3rd September 2019, 23:12
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Brocklebanks only had one to my knowledge ; Ruth Weir ; she later married the second mate that was on the Mahsud 1974 . Never heard of her since .
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  #159  
Old 4th September 2019, 02:33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tunatownshipwreck View Post
Was she on the Scotstoun summer/fall 1971?
The old DENHOLM NEWS listed personnel for Masters, Mates, Ch Engineers, Engineers, Electricians, Cadets Deck & Engine also Catering Officers. No Radio Officers. Possibly because they were on contract from Marconi etc.

Within a couple years later the personnel list was dropped from the 'News'. Fleet was too big!

Stephen
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  #160  
Old 4th September 2019, 06:51
Bill.B Bill.B is offline  
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Denholms also had Kelvin Hughes sparkies. I did two trips on Nordic Patriot and one trip on Chemical Explorer and Chemical Venturer.
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  #161  
Old 4th September 2019, 11:55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephen J. Card View Post
Sailed with the second. Alice Millison in AVON BRIDGE, 1972. Next to join was Joan Wareing and she was in EDEN BRIDGE. I guess the flood gates opened then. Shelia Edmundson joined J&J as the first Nav Cadet in 1970 and she was first in the Merch. Ch Eng? Well that goes back to the 1930s with Victoria Drummond in Blue Funnel. Why not any female catering officers? Must be by now.
You are probably right Stephen, but I always thought we had the first nav cadet - Linda Forbes who was with SSM.
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  #162  
Old 4th September 2019, 13:51
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Sheila Edmundson was in the NAESS CHAMPION early 1970. I believe Sheila was the first to get her Master's.
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  #163  
Old 4th September 2019, 23:05
Laurie Ridyard Laurie Ridyard is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Winmar View Post
I and probably others Laurie, find it very distasteful that you find it necessary to blight a young ladies character by referring to her as a Peese Artiste or piss artist on a web site. The Merchant Navy of old being what it was, I doubt very much wether there are any of us whose activities would stand very much scrutiny over the years, myself included. I think that you should revert to the old adage, what happens in ***** stays in *****I! It would be kinder and a bit more diplomatic! Just an opinion mind you!
That was over 40 years ago.

They were such a pair of Peeese Artistes, they probably long ago succumbed to the effects cirrhosis of the liver.

For my part, my parents taught me the evils of alcohol in excess

Before I went to sea, my father sent me to see a Ch. Stwd. who warned me of dangers of alcohol at sea. I can honestly state I have never been drunk in my life.
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  #164  
Old 5th September 2019, 11:46
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Originally Posted by Laurie Ridyard View Post
I can honestly state I have never been drunk in my life.
And I can honestly state that I have never been a Chief Steward in my life.
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  #165  
Old 5th September 2019, 15:17
Laurie Ridyard Laurie Ridyard is offline  
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And I can honestly state that I have never been a Chief Steward in my life.
Aye ?
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  #166  
Old 5th September 2019, 17:38
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But you'll still have had to type a crew list or two Ron, I'll be bound.
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  #167  
Old 5th September 2019, 18:47
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But you'll still have had to type a crew list or two Ron, I'll be bound.
No, we MIMCo men were above such things in my day. Reserved for the likes of Blue Flue sparkies and othe Direct Employ guys (and gals, I suppose).
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  #168  
Old 5th September 2019, 20:55
stevekelly10 stevekelly10 is offline  
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When I was doing my phase 3 at Springburn college Glasgow in 1970. myself and another 3 cadets had a flat there ! on the ground floor flat one of the girls there, was going out with one of my flatmates. Anyway she eventually decided she wanted to go to sea ! She was the first female accepted to go to Glasgow Nautical college to train as an RO ! I often wonder what happened to her ?
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  #169  
Old 6th September 2019, 09:51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Laurie Ridyard View Post
That was over 40 years ago.

They were such a pair of Peeese Artistes, they probably long ago succumbed to the effects cirrhosis of the liver.

For my part, my parents taught me the evils of alcohol in excess

Before I went to sea, my father sent me to see a Ch. Stwd. who warned me of dangers of alcohol at sea. I can honestly state I have never been drunk in my life.

Bet you were a barrel of laughs in the smokeroom!
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  #170  
Old 7th September 2019, 17:17
Laurie Ridyard Laurie Ridyard is offline  
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Originally Posted by Troppo2 View Post
Bet you were a barrel of laughs in the smokeroom!
The Peese Artistes I have come across always drank in their cabins or ashore, with the exception of the one with the female R/O.

That had a bar, and everybody but the Lecky and me were nutcase Peese Artistes. They were not a barrel of laughs.
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  #171  
Old 20th September 2019, 00:09
djringjr djringjr is offline  
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I can add a few more female R/O's.

Andrianna POLITOU

I’m ex. marine radio officer with 10 years seaservice in worldwide bulk carriers. On the picture I was on board M/V GOLDEN PRINCE/3ELT5. This station was from JRC. I was there in 1990, in Caribbean sea, 12 months in this ship. Now I am active with amateur radio callsign SV8GFW. M/V GOLDEN PRINCE.
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  #172  
Old 20th September 2019, 00:10
djringjr djringjr is offline  
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Denice Stoops (USA)
I was born in Saginaw, Michigan U.S.A. in 1956. Joined the U.S. Coast Guard in 1974 and went to work as a telegrapher for RCA as the first female operator (T-3) at KPH in 1979. KPH closed in 1997. I joined the radio department on the O’Brien in 2007 and upgraded my license to a T-1 to operate the transmitters. In 2009 I was offered a position on the SS Lane Victory/KECW and I sailed on her as 2nd R/O in Sept. I currently operate at KSM. 73/88
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  #173  
Old 20th September 2019, 00:16
djringjr djringjr is offline  
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Claudia Oehm Wendisch

Born in Bonn 1949.

* 1969 Second Class Ship Radiotelegraph Operator’s Certificate.

* 1969/70 R.O. M/V Linzertor/DDQM, bulk carrier,

* 1970/71 R.O. M/V Johannes Bos/DIBJ, general cargo,

* 1971/72 R.O. M/T St. Petri/DAKP, tanker

* 1972 R.O. M/V Belgrano/DGDB, bulk/car carrier

* 1972/73 R.O. M/V Santa Fé/DNFX, general cargo

* 1973 First Class Ship Radiotelegraph Operator’s Certificate.

* 1973/74 R.O. M/V Polar Brasil/DGBZ, reefer

* 1974/76 R.O. M/T St. Jacobi/DAJA, tanker

* 1976 R.O. M/T St. Clemens/DAHC, tanker

* 1977 Became mother of a daughter and stayed at home,

later short substitutions:

* 1986 R.O. Substitution M/T Kurt Illies/DNKB, tanker

* 1988 R.O. Substitution M/T Immanuel Kant/DIKF, tanker

* 1989 R.O. Substitution M/T Hermann Schulte/YJXN6, tanker, flag Vanuatu

* 1990 R.O. Substitution M/V Atalanta/P3YD2, container ship, flag Cypres

* 1991 R.O. Substitution M/V Billie Fay/ELDN9, bulk carrier, flag Liberia

* 1992 R.O. Substitution M/V Columbus Olinda/ELHH9, container ship, Liberia, last ship!

* 1995 General Operator’s Certificate (GMDSS), Flensburg

* Since 1989 Teacher for Radio Licences in my own school:

* Since 2002 Publication of different books for Ship’s Radio Communications

* Since 1986 Radio Amateur Licence with call sign DL5LBC
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  #174  
Old 20th September 2019, 00:18
djringjr djringjr is offline  
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Eva Marie Jensen

Born in Tønsberg, Norway 1952. First time to sea with “Shikoku Geir” in 1975. Then busdriver before sea again. Was radioofficer from 1978, I sailed with Texaco Norway A/S company until 1985, my favorite was the beautiful midship tanker “Texaco Skandinavia”. Even the callsign was melodious: LEID. Then in Bergesen company from 1986 to 1991, mainly as deck officer on gas tankers. Last ship was “Rosa Tucano” in 1993. From then on I worked in “Kystverket”, the Norwegian Coastal Administration. (At that time I had taken over my father’s farm, I run it until 2004.) In 1998 Kystverket established a VTS, monitoring the ship traffic in the Oslofjord, and I have been here at Horten VTS ever since. At the moment (2009) I’m working with yet another Texaco reunion. My regards to all! Eva M Jensen.
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  #175  
Old 20th September 2019, 00:28
djringjr djringjr is offline  
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Olive Caroll

Some photos attached but it's best to see this URL:

http://radioalumni.ca/x_CarrollOlive.htm

Point Grey ' Y ' and monitoring station
Olive Carroll recalls of her time as an intercept operator

From her book , and from private correspondence, adapted for the web by Laval , Dec. 2009
Olive Carroll

While still a high school student in Vancouver during the war years, and learning how to Morse by lamp, I found I quite enjoyed code.

I studied wireless at the Sprott Shaw School of Radio in Vancouver, started with evening classes but I was disappointed to learn that it would take two years of work to obtain my 2nd Class certificate. Making good progress, the principal recommended me for a government subsidy plan , I accepted and finally got my certificate 8th June 1944. Under contract to the government I was immediately posted to the Pt. Grey Wireless Station call sign VAI as an intercept operator with a good friend Elizabeth King, better known as ‘ Red ‘.

VAI was situated on Westbrook Crescent and the station was a smallish two storey house set on a huge piece of land with an imposing antenna array. The OIC, Andy Gray, lived in a separate house nearby. On the first floor of the station was Mr. Gray’s office, a small frequency monitoring room (if memory serves me correctly) and the larger marine room, with I believe, two operating positions. Upstairs, at the top of the landing, was the intercept shift supervisor’s desk. To one side of the landing, facing north, was the recording room with at least four or five monitoring positions. Across the landing, in a smaller room, were three transcribing positions.

We few new recruits polished our Kana in the Marine Room. In fact classes weren't held at all on Kana out West - certainly not to my knowledge. We were given the code and told to learn it...on our own. Which we had to do pretty quickly. If memory serves me correctly (?) we were given a small bonus if we could get our copying speed up to 20 characters per min.

When judged efficient we were posted to shifts upstairs.

I don’t recall the surname of my initial shift supervisor, but I think his first name was Vern. Then there was a change and Sammy Gold became supervisor. I also do not recall the names of all the fellows monitoring and recording (there were never more than four or five at any time on my shift). Some I do remember were Ron Thomas ( he later went to VAE and eventually became a Radio Inspector ), George Scroxton, Tommy Mayne (formerly with the Merchant Navy) and a fellow who had flown with Ferry Command.. Regrettably I have forgotten the few others.

Only high speed stations were monitored - Japanese and a couple of Vichy French. I am not sure of the numbers but I believe they were FFZ2 and FFZ3 - I do recall that we always referred to them as Fuzzy 2 and Fuzzy 3 ! Once a station stopped idling and began transmitting the OM ops would record the transmissions on wax cylinders and as each cylinder was filled up a slip of paper with time, date and station call sign was tucked in the tube and placed on the supervisor’s desk.

As for any photos taken at Point Grey - I don't recall anyone taking pictures while I was there. Whether it was forbidden I'm not sure. At one time I did have an exterior shot of the station building but it seems to have been lost over the years.

Thank you for the photos of VAI...so much better than the one I had...(and yes I did know of Mr. Bowerman).

Pt Grey from Jack Bowernan/Ian Hayes

( from Jack Bowerman/Ian Hayes collection )

Thanks again for this picture where we can see the (UBC) University stadium and some of the buildings.... separated from the station by that wide strip of forest land.

Believe me, that brought back memories - of one particular graveyard shift night when absolutely no signals at all were coming in. Those who weren't snoozing were looking for some mischief to get into. Along with another op (Ron Thomas) we climbed the fence that surrounded the station property, made our way along a path through the woods...and into the stadium where we jogged around the track in the dark. Then back and over the fence again...only this time I caught my skirt and ripped a seam open! Thank goodness for safety pins.

But I digress..

All transcribing of the wax cylinders was done by YL operators. (The other two on my shift were Janet Bird and Florence Quilty) Typed transcripts were placed on the supervisor’s desk where they were collated, ready to be picked up by the Army motorcycle dispatch rider who came every afternoon. I believe these dispatches were then taken to the RCAF station at Sea Island and flown to Washington, D.C. We never knew of course, the contents of the intercepts and had no knowledge of what we were copying - only that our work was important. So it was very satisfying once when Mr. Gray notified us all that a commendation had been received from Washington congratulating the station on the quantity and quality of the intercepts!

One Japanese station was copied direct by the girls on every afternoon shift- this was from the Domei News Agency in Tokyo. This was in English of course and taken down on our typewriters at a good speed. At any one time actually only one girl was responsible to copy but because conditions were not always favourable the three on my shift all copied to help with any fills. The broadcasts contained names of prisoners of war and any other news of battles, Allied planes and ships lost (propaganda?) that the Japanese felt it necessary to pass on.

As for copying Kana, it wasn’t until decades later that I learned there were special typewriters for this task but I’m just as well pleased we only had a typical mill. It was enough to master the Japanese code without having to find ones way around a different keyboard as well.

After the messages had been transcribed the wax cylinders were shaved in a special little machine to be used, and used, again.

After VE Day the women operators at the station were notified that they were no longer under contract to the DOT and they could leave if they wished (!). No one did to my knowledge. But once VJ Day was a fact all female operators were released and the men reassigned to various positions throughout the province…or elsewhere.

Fortunately for a few of the girls (myself included ) we were hired by DND to replace personnel being discharged at their special wireless station (SWS #3 ) outside of Victoria on Vancouver island. The station remained at this QTH until about the late ‘40s when it was moved to the former RCAF station at Boundary Bay near Ladner, B.C. It is more than 60 years since I worked for the Signal Corps, and no doubt the work done there has long since been declassified, but I do not know that officially so I will not elaborate on what we did. No doubt you know of it anyway.

I left the DND when I had an opportunity to go to sea and in early ‘47 I flew to San Francisco to sign aboard the Norwegian M/V Siranger as Radio Officer, ship’s Purser and Captain’s secretary. I served at sea four years.

Lulu Island Operations room (Olive's photo)


Three other of the intercept YL operators who also followed a similar career path were Elizabeth (King) Anderson, Norma (Gomez) York and Lylie (Smith) Palmer. The first two were at Pt. Grey and Lylie at Lulu Island. She was the only one who didn’t serve with the DND. Lylie received her radio training in Winnipeg and was first employed for a year at Moose Factory by the Hudson’s Bay Fur Trade before going to Lulu Island.

In perusing Ernie Brown’s website I came across a name I recognized - Jim Taylor, who worked at the Lulu Island station in ‘44 and ‘45. There couldn’t have been two Jim Taylors there so it had to be one and the same person.. Jim, and some of his shift mates, were the only operators at the island station that I knew. They worked the same shift schedule as my shift at VAI, and I don’t really know how it started, but a couple of times in the winter of ‘44/’45, after coming off Graveyard, four from my shift got together with Jim and his mates (Vic Zariski, Malcolm Knox, Scotty Hyde and Bill B.?). We all traveled over to the North Shore and hiked for three hours up the mountain where we stayed at a primitive old lodge on Hollyburn (no highways up or gondola lifts in those days). We had to pack our own food as well (rationing remember) and we girls bunked in a dorm under the eaves (warmed by an old wood burning stove). The fellows were down on the main floor, no heat so they said, and they told us they were sleeping on pine boughs covered with blankets! At least the girls had mattresses of sorts. (I won’t mention the WC facilities! ). We all rented skis and had the mountain side to ourselves for two great days. Then came another hike down to ‘civilization’ in time for the afternoon shift. It was wonderful to be young wasn’t it!

But I digress… Jim Taylor was posted to Williams Lake up in central B.C. after war’s end and I believe he then returned to the east.

Regarding the list of names on the roll-call, four I definitely know and a couple seem vaguely familiar...but the remainder nothing.

Andy Gray of course...he was OIC at the station.

Agnes (Strachan) Lake is now a SK. She was at Radio School the same time as myself and we wrote our exams at the same time.

Ina Waller was the first YL ( young lady ) to earn her radio license in western Canada and she worked in the Marine Room at VAI. She was one of the girls who went with DND at Victoria. In late '46 Ina married Vic Zariski who had worked at Lulu Island. I believe at war's end Vic was posted to a station up the B.C. coast somewhere.

Elizabeth (King) Anderson - she followed the same path as myself. VAI, then DND then to sea in early '47.

I'm afraid my Point Grey memories are in no way exciting. Both Elizabeth Anderson and I are ( even collectively ) having trouble recalling names etc. at VAI. It was a little better when we went to #3 SWS - at least we have a few exterior photo shots of the station and personnel. And it was at that time I first began writing lengthy and detailed letters home...which my parents saved. It was the massive file of such letters, a daily diary and rough radio logs which enabled me to write the book about my time at sea so many years later. 

You had asked for me to include in my chronicle the 'before' and 'after' ... but when you read my book you will learn a little of the 'before' and a lot of the 'after' .

I think I must have strayed far from the information you asked for but thinking about those far away years awakened a lot of memories.

I applaud your plan to put together something about the monitoring service in Canada, but I also appreciate how difficult a task it might be. Our ranks have thinned considerably.

I'm pleased to have been able to make this small contribution... Olive
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Last edited by djringjr; 20th September 2019 at 00:46.. Reason: spaces too many
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