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  #51  
Old 4th July 2012, 17:13
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Hugh Ferguson Hugh Ferguson is offline  
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Any news on the where-abouts of this much travelled book?
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  #52  
Old 4th July 2012, 19:32
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It is in my possession Hugh. Much thumbed and well cared for. If anyone would like to volunteer, I can get the show on the road so to speak.
Regards,
Dave
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  #53  
Old 7th July 2012, 19:13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barrie Youde View Post
Hi, Dog!, Hi, Hugh,

Memories Memories!

To take Priam first, I recall reading that she arrived at Liverpool down by the head with a draft of 42 feet. I believe (but might be wrong) that her Master was Captain Jimmy Nelson. Be that as it may, Jimmy Nelson lived in Osmaston Road in Prenton (a few hundred yards from our own home in Queens Drive). For reasons which I did not understand until much later in life, I was under standing orders as a child (born 1943) to be on my best behaviour whenever I was anywhere near Chez Nelson. I later learned that this was because Jimmy Nelson had given my Dad a good reference at some point; and NOTHING WHATSOEVER was to be done which might blot Dad's copybook. Dad later told me that he had piloted Jimmy Nelson into the Mersey at some point in the war (whether in Priam or not, I do not know) and had been obliged to anchor prior to docking. Nelson was then called ashore to an urgent conference. Before going ashore he said to Dad, "You seem to know what you are doing. Take good care of her" - and left Dad and the Mate to put the ship into Gladstone and her berth. Dad would have been aged 32 in 1942. The name Nelson was therefore sanctified in the Youde household.

As to the Surgeon's Log, Hugh, what an interesting yarn and sequence of events. I would very much like to read the book one day. (I wonder how it might compare with Richard Gordon?) Your own research and information re Bill Holman senior reminds us that, unfortunately, we all have feet of clay.
Please forgive me if I start a new Thread on influential books!
Stacks of copies available on ABE Books, Barrie--one for as little as a fiver (incl. postage)!!!
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  #54  
Old 8th July 2012, 06:23
Barrie Youde Barrie Youde is online now  
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Many thanks, Hugh.
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  #55  
Old 8th July 2012, 09:58
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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Why not just ask Makko, Barrie? And don't forget to add your name to the list inside.

John T
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  #56  
Old 8th July 2012, 10:48
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hugh Ferguson View Post
Dr James Johnston Abraham's view of Japanese women:-
-------her presence is so all-pervasive in her own country. Every time one buys a fan or a piece of china she is there. Her presence sends a ray of sunshine into every street. It is impossible to avoid her. As a rule one doesn't try to; for the Japanese woman is the greatest thing in Japan. Her beauty is of a difference-it grows on one day by day; and the longer one stays in the country the more one admires it. Men who have lived there tell me that it slowly permeates till one wakes up suddenly to find some day that the high acquiline Caucasian type has become distasteful to one, when by chance one meets a fellow countrywoman in the streets of a Japanese city.
She is so dainty so fine-lined, so small, so very gorgeous in her dress, so very artificial in her headgear bristling with pins; her smile is so ever-ready, her temper so equable, it is difficult to believe she can be really alive, could ever look cross, or be untidy.
She is inimitable, the apotheosis of Japanese civilisation. There is nothing in Europe at all like her--------------

Anyone go along with this view???
Ichiko, Osaka-ko 1972/74
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  #57  
Old 8th July 2012, 11:10
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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Originally Posted by alan ward View Post
Ichiko, Osaka-ko 1972/74
Sumiko, Kobe, around the same time.

John T
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  #58  
Old 18th November 2012, 16:27
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Just to save this thread from disappearing, out of sight, down into the archives, here are a couple of photographs taken on an old plate camera by the author of the book, The Surgeon's Log. The woman at top of the gangway is the sew sew girl.
(They are out of a 1st edition of the book, dated 1911, and do not appear, as far as I know, in any of the 30 following editions).

My first time in Singapore was in Sept.1945 when peace-time conditions had not been restored, but it was not long before they were and on all subsequent visits I would not have noticed any difference between then and when the pictures were taken in 1907.
But now, in the 21st century, it is all changed and has become a part of history.
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File Type: jpg Cargo work in Singapore 1907.jpg (215.5 KB, 76 views)
File Type: jpg Sew sew woman Singapore 1907.jpg (161.0 KB, 78 views)
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  #59  
Old 18th November 2012, 19:56
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Coaling in Moji with Mr Flanagan C/E overseeing operations. Note, all women!
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File Type: jpg Coaling in Moji 1907.jpg (235.1 KB, 71 views)
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  #60  
Old 18th November 2012, 23:58
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Coaling in Moji with Mr Flanagan C/E overseeing operations. Note, all women!
I recall discharging sugar ( ex Durban ) in Tokyo with all female stevedores. Cape York 1964. They shovelled the stuff into skips and then swept the remnants up with straw brooms into baskets. It took about a week to discharge. Less than a year later it had all changed, all grabs and mechanisation not a female in sight.
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  #61  
Old 19th November 2012, 10:40
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Another photo taken by the author on his "plate" camera which he often had cause to curse on account of not having a "plate" ready for a photo opportunity: well, it was 1907 when, I don't suppose, there were many people who owned a camera. In his log he never makes any mention of developing the photos so, I can but presume, he would have to have stored them safely during the five month long voyage.

(This is Captain Chrimes and Chief Engineer Flanagan taking a ride in Macassar when the Polyphemus was loading homeward bound).
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  #62  
Old 2nd May 2013, 00:49
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good morning hugh ferguson.s.m.7th.jan.2008.07:29.re:lifeboat no.7.i have been reading this old thread.i found it very interesting.but your link in (post 3)shows photo's of the life boat and the rescued crew menbers,an amazing story of endurance.and great navigation to make land.i liked the romantic story set in the days were japanes and Europeans did not mix.(post22)a great post.thank you for sharing.regards ben27
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  #63  
Old 17th July 2013, 08:56
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During the last couple of weeks there have been no fewer than 70 "hits" on this old thread but no further comments! Interesting!

The life-boat No.7 referred to by Ben was to be seen in one of the random pictures and was unrelated to this thread.
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  #64  
Old 17th July 2013, 09:55
rich9591 rich9591 is offline  
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Just for the record this book was serialised on what is now BBC Radio 4 in the early 1980's when they had a book reading at 4:30pm each weekday.
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  #65  
Old 17th July 2013, 18:56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hugh Ferguson View Post
The book (Surgeon's Log) ran to 31 editions (even had an American edition) and was re. and re-published over some 40 odd years. The last edition was dedicated to the author's daughter whom I had the good fortune to meet when she visited me in 1997. She, whose name was Jill and has since died, came with the very journal her father kept during the voyage and after her return home, had it all photo-copied and sent to me!
If you go to a web-site such as ABE books you will find many copies available from all over the world; there was even a Penguin paperback edition.
It became a mini travel classic and, after 9 rejections by prospective publishers, it became a best seller. It was first published in 1911.
A good read, and was probably responsible for me choosing to go to sea in the Blue Funnel Line.
Like Hugh, this book was a big contributor to me going to sea. I had my parents wartime penguin edition, now tattered beyond reading so I have bought a hard backed earlier edition to replace it. A wonderful set of stories that even though it was generations out of date when I read and reread in in the 1960s, continues even now to give a fair feel for life at sea and runs ashore.

Other books that were influential for me were The Cruise of the Cachalot, The Kontiki expedition, The Seas Were Mine, The last grain race, the various coastwise books by WW Jacobs, and when I was little I loved the Edard Ardizzone books about Tim and his seafaring adventures and even before I could read I had a Little Golden Books Boats (http://www.ebay.com/bhp/little-golden-book-boats).

When people ask me why I wanted to go to sea, I honestly cannot remember a time before I wanted to go to sea. I was so lucky to get the chance.
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  #66  
Old 25th January 2014, 13:17
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Originally Posted by trotterdotpom View Post
Very interesting, Hugh, I for one will be keeping an eye out for the book. It must have been very satisfying to come to meet and befriend those people.

Sailing to Japan, it seemed that everyone either hated the place or fell in love with it. I was one of the smitten and agree whole heartedly with Dr Abraham's description of Japanese ladies.

One afternoon, on a visit to Kyoto, I saw what must have been a genuine Geisha walking towards me - white face, zillion Yen kimono, dainty little steps, I was entranced. The spell was broken when she hawked up a big greenie and gobbed it out onto the pavement! Wow, I know they take years to learn the tea ceremony, etc, but she even spat gracefully! I did think that she could have had a tissue tucked into her obi though.

That was over 30 years ago, she'll have no idea of the impact she made on a gauping gai-jin in that bustling little backstreet.

John T.
Poor girl, she must have had a bad cold; I don't think trotterdotpom would see this happen should he visit Japan this day and age.

(Apologies for resurrecting one of my own threads, but at least it is about nostalgia!)
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  #67  
Old 25th January 2014, 14:33
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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Maybe not Hugh, but you never know, I hear the old traditions still survive in amongst all that crazy new stuff that goes on there.

Any news of the book's travels?

John T
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  #68  
Old 25th January 2014, 17:56
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Originally Posted by trotterdotpom View Post
Maybe not Hugh, but you never know, I hear the old traditions still survive in amongst all that crazy new stuff that goes on there.

Any news of the book's travels?

John T
makko was the last recipient-as far as I know-I've asked him to let us know. I wouldn't think there was much left of it now!
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  #69  
Old 27th January 2014, 15:01
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Originally Posted by trotterdotpom View Post
Maybe not Hugh, but you never know, I hear the old traditions still survive in amongst all that crazy new stuff that goes on there.

Any news of the book's travels?

John T
Still with makko in Mexico City.
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  #70  
Old 30th January 2014, 01:11
TonyAllen TonyAllen is offline  
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I sent it to macko I think 2 years ago.He should have read it by now methinks
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  #71  
Old 30th January 2014, 03:08
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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I sent it to macko I think 2 years ago.He should have read it by now methinks
Probably nobody has put their name forward as a recipient.

For the benefit of those who may not be aware, the book is about a ship's surgeon's voyage to the Far East on a Blue Funnel ship in the early 1900s. Hugh Ferguson generously made it available to SN members to pass around. It has been to a few places in Australia and now is in Mexico.

There is more information on Hugh's thread about the book.

John T
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  #72  
Old 30th January 2014, 03:09
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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Originally Posted by trotterdotpom View Post
Probably nobody has put their name forward as a recipient.

For the benefit of those who may not be aware, the book is about a ship's surgeon's voyage to the Far East on a Blue Funnel ship in the early 1900s. Hugh Ferguson generously made it available to SN members to pass around. It has been to a few places in Australia and now is in Mexico.

There is more information on Hugh's thread about the book.

John T
PS make that this thread!
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  #73  
Old 30th January 2014, 15:14
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Please contact me if you would be interested in reading this book. I have it in my possession.
Rgds.
Dave
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  #74  
Old 30th January 2014, 16:32
Hamish Mackintosh Hamish Mackintosh is offline  
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PS make that this thread!
Not True JT
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  #75  
Old 31st January 2014, 00:05
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If you search on 't net it is available as an electronic text. It takes a bit of finding, and I did this some time ago in Google books. It seems to have been scanned from a library book, so as libraries quietly salute and pass over the horizon, this may be the most easily available text for the interested reader.

I have just spent 30 min trying to find this from infromation in the header of my downloaded copy, but not much success. PM me if you want more details of where I downloaded it, my reply may help your search.
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