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Steam, steam and more steam

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  #26  
Old 27th September 2005, 18:52
lakercapt lakercapt is offline  
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Further to my last post about steam up and downers still working.
Spelt the name wrong, it is RMS Segwun and it was built in 1887 so its older than some of our super moderators!!!

Last edited by lakercapt; 27th September 2005 at 18:53.. Reason: Spelling
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  #27  
Old 27th September 2005, 19:14
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michael james michael james is offline  
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Working Steam Models

Quote:
Originally Posted by ernest
I very much like your models Michael, how many more have you hidden away that we might be privelidge to see!. At most of the shows I attend there is nearly always a Model Engineer section with everything working on compressed air, and always a great crowd puller.
Ernest, Thank you for your kind words, I still have one of my first attempts, which is not worthy of public showing and yet it runs on steam or compressed air much more smoothly than the better looking models. All were machined from Stuart Turner casting sets - time consuming hobby 5 models in 12 years !

The model I was most proud of was a Coal mine winding engine, which I exhibited at a Model Engineer Exhibition in London in 1984 and I was offered what I considered silly money for it, thats the only one I no longer have, unfortunately I dont even have photographs as I passed over all photographic records of the build and later ones to the new owner.

For your eyes only, first attempt photo ! Dont look too closely

Kind regards
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File Type: jpg First One 2.JPG (22.7 KB, 50 views)
File Type: jpg First One.JPG (36.3 KB, 62 views)

Last edited by michael james; 27th September 2005 at 19:23.. Reason: Addition if pic
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  #28  
Old 27th September 2005, 19:41
Santos Santos is offline  
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Steam, Steam and more steam

Well done Mike, lovely model, its a pity about the winding engine, I would like to have seen that one.

I have great respect and admiration for model builders especially those of working engines like yours. The time, effort and skill that goes into making those tiny metal parts is fantastic. You all must have tremendous patience.

I imagine you must get a great thrill seeing the models working after all the hard work you have put into them, a great reward.

Chris.
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  #29  
Old 27th September 2005, 20:00
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John Rogers John Rogers is offline  
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Hi Neil, yes that was a big hammer to swing. Because I was always willing to learn new things I was picked on to help the engineers all the time,ended up doing things they should do like packing the seals on the pumps and tearing down the generators to put new rings on the pistons. I must say it never hurt me to do it. One job I didn't like was on the big diesels when we had to clean out the sludge from inside the engines being only 5 ft 7in I would slip right into the access plates,and I was always glad to slip right out again. The way I dressed for that job was to cut two holes in a burlap sack for my legs and do the same for my arms in another sack and thats the way I went into the engine. I wonder if they done it that way in later years. What a dirty black mess that was,took days to get myself clean again.
John.
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  #30  
Old 27th September 2005, 22:40
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Steam, steam and more steam

[QUOTE=thunderd "the old steam mechanism that used to lift the two halves of London Bridge".

The proper term for the lifting roadway decks on Tower Bridge is "bascules". As far as I recall (and others older and wiser will correct me) the moving parts of Tower Bridge were driven by hydraulic power. In the late 19th and early 20th Centuries, parts of London were equipped with a hydraulic power supply which was used to drive many moving facilities, such as lifts (elevators to those of you West of Greenwich) in hotels and office buildings. A sort of ring main of hydraulic pipes ran under the streets of the city and business premises took out a contract with the supply company and were then connected to the hydraulic main in the street outside. The company that supplied this service was in direct competition with the electricity companies that sprang up to supply power to the metropolis.

Tower Bridge was only one of many users of the service.

Ron
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  #31  
Old 28th September 2005, 17:19
neil maclachlan neil maclachlan is offline  
 
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Hi John,
My you bring back memories to me re cleaning the scavenge ducts on B&W two stroke engines,I used to feel sorry for the lads dressed as you descibe with rags out the rag bag over their heads--what a mess,try and get that stuff out your nails, commonly known as scavenge sh---t
Cheers
Neil Mac.
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  #32  
Old 28th September 2005, 18:44
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Not good memories Neil but memories no less. I'm wondering what clothing they wear these days and do they receive extra money for that kind of work. Its Possible that kind of work be contracted out to some native Contractor staffed with small people.
Like Munchkins!! from the Wizard of OZ. Note: Derek notice I did not say the land of OZ
John.
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  #33  
Old 28th September 2005, 19:43
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Apart from getting the timing right the most dangerous thing when "feeling round" on a triple expansion engine was if a piece of a thin shim had been left protruding out between the faces of top and bottom ends.
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  #34  
Old 18th October 2005, 06:51
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KIWI KIWI is offline  
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Steam Engines.When I joined Kronviken a Liberty I was down below leaving Welligton & on being shown how& told to feel the big ends Ifelt like packing my bags to go ashore in the Pilot boat.That egine was a tiddler compared to those on Maloja.A film of those engines at if I remember rightly 70 odd revs would fascinate many people in this day & age. Kiwi
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  #35  
Old 18th October 2005, 09:47
Burwah Burwah is offline
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There is a steamship still in regular service in N.Z. It is the SS Earnslaw, built in 1911 to service the farms and settlements of the upper reaches of Lake Wakatipu in the South Island, but is now mainly used as a tourist attraction.
It is 329 GRT, and has twin triple expansion engines supplied with steam from two coal fired boilers.
Sid.
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  #36  
Old 20th October 2005, 10:51
Burwah Burwah is offline
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Kiwi, it may be of some interest to you that at least one triple expansion engine has been recorded on film while at sea. Included in it are two separate shots showing the watchkeeper feeling both the top and bottom ends which has been a matter of discussion through this thread.
The filming was done in 1963 on the Balarr, which was engaged on the Australian Coastal trade.
Some footage of this film has been incorporated in a video produced by Des Cox of Snowbow Productions. The video is "Ships to New Zealand", (Part 5), Episode 22. There is also footage depicting the routine life on board an ordinary old cargo ship, both above and below decks as it was back in the 1950's, with shots of a Doxford engine probably not seen before.
Sid.
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  #37  
Old 15th December 2005, 03:42
bobby388 bobby388 is offline  
 
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hi derek dont know if youve seen poem by kipling macandrews hymn its very long but my fav verse goes i stand the middle watch up here alone wi god an these my engines efter 90days o rake an rack an strain thro a the seas o thy world slam bangin home again slam bang to much she knocks a wee the crosshead jibs are loose but thirty thousand miles o sea has geid them fair excuse p.s not a steam man myself but if any body would like the lot give me a messg (bobby)glagow cheers
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  #38  
Old 16th December 2005, 06:37
raybnz raybnz is offline  
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If some of you guys are interested in firing coal into a scotch boiler be on the Devonport Wharf here in Auckland tomorrow afternoon (Saturday 17th December) and you can do the honours.Plenty of spare shovels to go around.The steam tug W C Daldy only takes 1 1/2 tons per hour if the skipper wants to go water skiing.

Also you could have a go at feeling for warm bearings too.But a well maintained and loved triple expansion steam engine run smooth.Just as Mr Weirs pumps do also.

Last edited by raybnz; 16th December 2005 at 06:58..
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  #39  
Old 16th December 2005, 07:59
Doug Rogers Doug Rogers is offline  
 
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Sorry, would love to join you, apart from 3 stuffed lower vertebrae and a host of Xmas engagements...enjoy..I will be with you in spirit...
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  #40  
Old 16th December 2005, 09:44
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Doxfordman Doxfordman is offline  
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If only I lived in KIWI and not Tassie, served with a lot of Scotch boilers, some converted to burn oil and not coal.

R651400, yes scavange sh.t still does occur, the fuel quality these days is even worse then in my day, but there of course plans afoot by IMO to change all of that and reduce the sulpher content, a new MARPOL ruling. Modern engines do burn a lot cleaner but the old scavange clean still needs to be done - load up the rag bin!
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  #41  
Old 16th December 2005, 16:02
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As mentione d in post 13 ss Earnslaw has a scott chief engineer, with a chiefs and used to work for Bibby line.
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  #42  
Old 16th December 2005, 20:09
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KIWI KIWI is offline  
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Steam Engines.There has been mention of engines running like "sewing machines" but the best examples I have seen were the Bellis Morcom driven generators on the old Union Co Wahine.They just purred & more noise could be heard from the generator brushes.A much bigger working BM can be seen in Sydney Maritime Museum. KIWI
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  #43  
Old 18th December 2005, 00:22
raybnz raybnz is offline  
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Mr Weir pumps

Last night while doing a bit of driving on Daldys Starboard engine I wondered why Mr Weir built that special moan into their feed pumps. Our port feed pump has a nice moan built into it and it can be heard all around the tug.

I suppose it was that way so the duty engineer could lay in his bunk while alongside and know all is well with boiler feed system. Should he awake and not hear it he would no doubt arrive on the plates to find the fireman bashing the **** out of the shuttle valve.

A terrific reliable simple pump and a credit to the tradesmen that manufactured them.

ps: one of the engineers was asked by a passenger where the ignition key was to start the engines. At least it wasnt for a bucket of steam or the golden rivet.
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  #44  
Old 18th December 2005, 05:41
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Re B&M engines.Had an aged moment it is the old Pyrmont Power House museum that has a quite big working B&M engine not the Maritime. KIWI
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  #45  
Old 18th December 2005, 13:09
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Phill Phill is offline   SN Supporter
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Tower Bridge. Iím lucky enough to work just 5 minutes away from her, come all weathers I have spent many an hour there, having taken many hours of video of all forms of shipping , of which Iím slowly converting to CD, I say her, do they not class her as a ship, a busy city like London and still traffic has to give way to shipping, although when the bridge is raised this causes very little disruption to traffic, as all is timed to perfection, the engines you talk about are in a separate building below the bridge on the south side of the river, an excellent exhibition even down to the oily engine room smell, well worth a visit.

for lifting times and prices visit the site www.towerbridge.org.uk

Phill

Last edited by Phill; 18th December 2005 at 16:54..
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  #46  
Old 18th December 2005, 16:54
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kenneth morley a great port as a home base Marrsellie
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  #47  
Old 18th December 2005, 20:51
douglasjamesmichael douglasjamesmichael is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by raybnz
Last night while doing a bit of driving on Daldys Starboard engine I wondered why Mr Weir built that special moan into their feed pumps. Our port feed pump has a nice moan built into it and it can be heard all around the tug.

I suppose it was that way so the duty engineer could lay in his bunk while alongside and know all is well with boiler feed system. Should he awake and not hear it he would no doubt arrive on the plates to find the fireman bashing the **** out of the shuttle valve.

A terrific reliable simple pump and a credit to the tradesmen that manufactured them.

ps: one of the engineers was asked by a passenger where the ignition key was to start the engines. At least it wasnt for a bucket of steam or the golden rivet.

Thank you - I was one of these men during my apprenticeship at G&J Weir / Weir Pumps
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  #48  
Old 22nd January 2006, 18:51
billmaca billmaca is offline  
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I dont think most folk I speak to dont beleave it when you tell them that you used to hang on to a hand rail and stick your hand into the crank of an engine steam of course with just a small strip of steel plate to stop your feet going in with her rolling all over the place, you had to watch the oil pipe dpwn to the bigend as it could grip the fingers they were lovely engines all the same
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  #49  
Old 22nd June 2006, 19:00
jock paul jock paul is offline  
 
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steam steam and more steam

First time I have read this thread. Brings back happy memories. Feeling bottom end bearing by hand. God help the engineer who had refitted a bottom end bearing without trimming his brass shims! It could tear your hand open. Also nostalgia for the "groan" of well fitted bucket rings on a Weir's pump. The usual way of testing whether these needed attention was to open water to the pump, close the discharge valve and count the number of strokes per minute. On a well fitted pump it wasn't more than about 3.
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  #50  
Old 27th June 2006, 21:31
BarryM BarryM is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neil maclachlan
Hi John,
You are right, a Monday hammer was 28lb sledge uded to persuade the massive star spanners used to loosen up the big end bolt at the bottom of the connecting rod connecting the rod to the journal of the crankshaft. When I sailed on the "Australia Star" I was about the only engineer apart from some of the engine room ratings who was used to methods like this,the old Chief (out of John Browns,Clydebank,) would say let young Mac at it ,he'll move it. We also used to swing a ram on a chain block to do the same job.
Neil Mac.
I well remember the 28lb Monday hammer and the skill/strength needed to swing it. What I never found out was why it was called a 'Monday' hammer?
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