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Triple Expansion Marine Engines

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  #26  
Old 21st November 2010, 16:05
johnblack5 johnblack5 is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by surfaceblow View Post
There are four pages of pictures of the Jeremiah O'Brien engine room plus pictures of other old engines. If you go to the home page you can locate other old time engines including marine engines.

http://www.oldengine.org/members/die...odlandMenu.htm

Joe
Hello Joe
The link is broken, I have tried using a short version of the link without any success. The link http://www.ssjeremiahobrien.org/pixs.html
shows some good photos but only of the Obrien.


John
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  #27  
Old 21st November 2010, 16:11
johnblack5 johnblack5 is offline  
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Originally Posted by Billieboy View Post
Thanks for the pictures John, I had the great pleasure of standing next to the crankshaft lathe, when attending the Receiver's auction of the Sunderland shop. It was the happiest day of my life, to See the end of the monster factory.
You cannot leave me hanging, why were you so happy ?. Some of those fitters must have been real craftsmen. My father served his time with Yarwoods in Northwich and try as I might I could not touch him with the handtools, with a lathe I could win.

John
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  #28  
Old 21st November 2010, 18:22
surfaceblow surfaceblow is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnblack5 View Post
Hello Joe
The link is broken, I have tried using a short version of the link without any success. The link http://www.ssjeremiahobrien.org/pixs.html
shows some good photos but only of the Obrien.


John
John

The web site was down for a couple of hours this morning but it appears to be working at the present time.

Joe
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  #29  
Old 22nd November 2010, 04:34
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KIWI KIWI is offline  
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Having sailed on a Norwegian Liberty those photos sure bring back some memories.Our engine room was spotless but the J'OB looks like it is a work of art.Big regret is that the modern cine camera was not available to film them in action & then those of my next ship the Maloja which were very much bigger & really something to see in action.The smell of steam & oil is also never to be forgotten. KIWI
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  #30  
Old 22nd November 2010, 05:33
Billieboy Billieboy is offline  
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Originally Posted by johnblack5 View Post
You cannot leave me hanging, why were you so happy ?. Some of those fitters must have been real craftsmen. My father served his time with Yarwoods in Northwich and try as I might I could not touch him with the handtools, with a lathe I could win.

John
I was so happy because I'd spent 8months 12 days and 17hours on the, "Trelissick", as a first trip J/E. The Main Engine was a four legged Doxford built in 1949, water cooled with steam auxiliaries. The main cooling line burst after 22 hours on passage and the engine never ran for more than 24 hours after that. After running out of fuel and getting towed to Yokohama, we caught fire, eventually discharges and repaired, loaded timber at various west coast Canada ports and proceeded to the Panama canal, off Nicaragua all crank and crosshead bearings ran. Six days of 6 on 6 off nearly killed all of us engineers. I never ever sailed, (on articles), on another Motor ship.

Sorry about the lads who lost their jobs, it was the engine not those that built it! one job I had to do was make inch and a quarter(?), "A" frame bolts, on a belt driven mangle! had to use marmalade on the belts to get a cut on! I had nightmares for nearly two years after paying off this one.
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  #31  
Old 22nd November 2010, 08:40
johnblack5 johnblack5 is offline  
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Originally Posted by Billieboy View Post
I was so happy because I'd spent 8months 12 days and 17hours on the, "Trelissick", as a first trip J/E. The Main Engine was a four legged Doxford built in 1949, water cooled with steam auxiliaries. The main cooling line burst after 22 hours on passage and the engine never ran for more than 24 hours after that. After running out of fuel and getting towed to Yokohama, we caught fire, eventually discharges and repaired, loaded timber at various west coast Canada ports and proceeded to the Panama canal, off Nicaragua all crank and crosshead bearings ran. Six days of 6 on 6 off nearly killed all of us engineers. I never ever sailed, (on articles), on another Motor ship.

Sorry about the lads who lost their jobs, it was the engine not those that built it! one job I had to do was make inch and a quarter(?), "A" frame bolts, on a belt driven mangle! had to use marmalade on the belts to get a cut on! I had nightmares for nearly two years after paying off this one.
All is now clear, thanks Joe.
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  #32  
Old 22nd November 2010, 08:42
johnblack5 johnblack5 is offline  
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Originally Posted by surfaceblow View Post
John

The web site was down for a couple of hours this morning but it appears to be working at the present time.

Joe
It started up again on Sunday, some more good photo's. Have a look at this article, very interesting.



http://www.gla.ac.uk/services/archiv...athontheclyde/
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  #33  
Old 26th November 2010, 14:09
chuckgregg chuckgregg is offline  
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Hi I served my time at the Wallsend Slipway Engineering Co next door to the North Eastern Marine, whilst I was there the Slipway built the largest Doxford of its day a 6 cylinder 750mm bore center scavenge, and we were all impressed upon to make this special engine so great care was taken on all parts , I seem to remember to liners were sent to Switzerland to be chromed maybe this was just a rumour ? and the 1st time it was fired up it didn't blow the relief valves which was the norm, one of the jobs I worked on was grinding and to scrape the spherical main bearings. I think the engine was installed in the Hopemount a tanker. These were happy days at the Slipway and after working on Doxfords I became I confirmed steam queen and didn't sail on diesels until I needed motor time and this was served on Sulzers and B&W which were clockwork compared to the Doxfords with clean crankcases when doing deflections. Steam Turbines were also built at the Slipway and fitting out ships going trials on the land of NOD [New Outside Dept] was really the bst time and most of the Marine Engine Fitters apps went to sea with a wide variety of companies .
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  #34  
Old 26th November 2010, 16:42
chuckgregg chuckgregg is offline  
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Anyone else sail on Quadriple Expansion Engines

chuck
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  #35  
Old 27th November 2010, 20:53
johnblack5 johnblack5 is offline  
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Hello Chuck
Have a look at this web site especially the pictures from Sunderland Works, they will take you back a few years.

John
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  #36  
Old 27th November 2010, 21:27
chuckgregg chuckgregg is offline  
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Hi John its just like I remembered but its mostly machine work there was a hellova lot of fitting to be done after the machining of all the parts and a lot of other trades also involved, coppersmiths ,brassies , welders , electricians , whitemetal workers , blacksmiths , patternmakers , marker offs, and all the office staff , the girls in the tracing office , draftsmen , we had our own train drivers , riggers , boatmen to name but a few . Tradesmen are almost a thing of the past ,years ago I worked as a foreman in Smiths Docks North Shields and at that time there was only 4 apprentices in the whole yard. When I was attending South Shields Marine Colledge ships were three abreast on the quays waiting for drydocking in Smiths and that was only part of the river, used to cross the river from north to south on a steam ferry up & downer but
we could never get permission to go down for a look see. As a 4th in Atlantic Steam I actually sailed on LST's which had twin engine rooms and twin pressurised boiler rooms which were the chinese juniors domain. to see these brilliant engines running built by Canadian Pacific Railroads was quite something. To be able to go from full ahead to full astern WITHOUT CLOSING the steam valve was something I've never forgot you could not see the engine change direction and the only vibration was at the propeller , the Stevinson link gear was designed by a genius and had a magical quality about it. Another recip I was on was Skinner uniflow which had an enclosed crankcase and looked like a diesel but wasn't an American design which I've not been able to find out anything about the ship was originally a asphalt carrier and converted to a drill ship she was also a twin. This site has made my interest's flare up again and shall use the internet and try and find out more about the Skinner Uniflow
regards to all

Last edited by chuckgregg; 27th November 2010 at 21:29..
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  #37  
Old 27th November 2010, 22:29
chadburn chadburn is offline  
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Never worked on a Skinner uniflow but I have worked on a completely enclosed V.T.E. in the distant past. For most of us working on steam long legger's the Stephenson Link motion was a great system especially when working on them, they certainly were a learning curve on Draw filing when working on the Link's themselves. Has anybody ever worked on Joy's VTE Valve gear?
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  #38  
Old 28th November 2010, 00:16
stores stores is offline   SN Supporter
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triple expansion

only worked on 2 ships that were triple expansion, fireman on one, greaser on other, best engines of all, silent power, never forget the smell. second one was twin screw, so two 3 leggied jobs, fantastic, can someone explain to me quadruple expansion, i know 4 cylinder, also whats the difference in a compound steam engine, ? and cross compound. i read somewhere they were difficult to reverse, ? ? thanks, STORES.
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  #39  
Old 28th November 2010, 19:39
chuckgregg chuckgregg is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stores View Post
only worked on 2 ships that were triple expansion, fireman on one, greaser on other, best engines of all, silent power, never forget the smell. second one was twin screw, so two 3 leggied jobs, fantastic, can someone explain to me quadruple expansion, i know 4 cylinder, also whats the difference in a compound steam engine, ? and cross compound. i read somewhere they were difficult to reverse, ? ? thanks, STORES.
Hi Stores google skinner uniflow steam engine an excellent site explains most of your questions , this engine had poppet valves worked off a cam shaft, the biggest up & downer I ever saw was quick visit aboard a Factory Whaling ship I think it was the Southern ???? and quick note the North Eastern Marine had patent on a reheat system on steam between cylinders cannot recall which
ones though.
rgds Chuck
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  #40  
Old 28th September 2016, 05:22
Stuclem Stuclem is offline  
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Albany: Historical Whaling Station

Their is a Triple Expansion Steam Engine at The Historical Whale Station, Albany, Australia. It was removed form the Whale Chaser Cheynes 3, after Whaling operations had finished in Australia. The Cheynes IV is also on display as a complete Whale Chaser, with the engine room open for display, this ship had a steam four cylinder compound engine, with Foster Wheeler boilers.
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  #41  
Old 28th September 2016, 06:26
Stuclem Stuclem is offline  
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Albany: Historical Whaling Station

Their is a Triple Expansion Steam Engine at The Historical Whale Station, Albany, Australia. It was removed form the Whale Chaser Cheynes 3, after Whaling operations had finished in Australia. The Cheynes IV is also on display as a complete Whale Chaser, with the engine room open for display, this ship had a steam four cylinder compound engine, with Foster Wheeler boilers.
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  #42  
Old 5th October 2016, 06:56
oceanmariner oceanmariner is offline  
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Re: Liberty specs.
My father sailed on several Liberties and ended the war as a chief. In the 50s I got to sail with him on a couple short trips. His brother was the captain so no issues.
Anyway, I ended up being a bridge guy but know a little, saw a lot. None of the Liberties I was aboard had scotch boilers. All had 2 water tube boilers, oil fired. I don't know the boiler name, but do know what a scotch boiler looks like. They were probably US built ships. I know some came out of mothball fleet near Astoria, Oregon.
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  #43  
Old 5th October 2016, 08:00
david freeman david freeman is offline  
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Originally Posted by johnblack5 View Post
Does anyone have any drawings or photographs of Triple Expansion engines engines built in the UK. I plan to build a model of the engines fitted to the Liberty Ships and really need a lot of detail. So much was destroyed when all the yards closed.
I am going back in time; now (70's -90's). If you live near a port with a marine college (Engineering0, or a museum in a port within the UK that was central to ship building/owning/fishing and other marine interest. Then very often in the foyers and corridors of knowledge (laboratories) within these establishments were working models of engines (Main Propulsion)? Should you be lucky enough to enquire and visit the college or its achieves/stores and see if one can be invited to view the artefacts.
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