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Manchester Ship Canal

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  #26  
Old 27th February 2011, 14:36
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Pat Kennedy Pat Kennedy is online now  
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Originally Posted by Bob S View Post
Changing the subject a bit, do the Mersey Ferries still do the occassional outing along the canal?

Regards

Bob
Yes they do. Starting on April 20th and running until mid October they run every week. A great day out, I did one last year and enjoyed it immensely.
Details are at this link;

http://www.merseyferries.co.uk/Conte...alCruises.aspx
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  #27  
Old 27th February 2011, 18:08
Gareth Jones Gareth Jones is offline  
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I have in my possession a volume of 'The Graphic' Newspaper which covers the inauguration of the Manchester ship canal January 1894.
There are a few sketches of scenes, along the canal. I suppose photography may have been difficult to transpose into newsprint at that time.
I thought members might be interested to see these so I've scanned them and posted them in my gallery.
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  #28  
Old 1st March 2011, 17:23
Bob S Bob S is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pat Kennedy View Post
Yes they do. Starting on April 20th and running until mid October they run every week. A great day out, I did one last year and enjoyed it immensely.
Details are at this link;

http://www.merseyferries.co.uk/Conte...alCruises.aspx
Wow, every week, I only thought they did a couple of times a year . Hopefully be able to fit it in sometime soon.

Thanks Pat

Bob
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  #29  
Old 5th March 2011, 23:39
PJG1412 PJG1412 is offline  
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I have recently purchased 2 x DVD's of the Manchester Ship Canel Part1 & 2, these are available from the website below. Each DVD cover has a photo of the Furness Withy ship Pacific Envoy. I sailed on this ship 1962/63, hence my interest in buying. They cover a period from 1955-64 some excellent shots of many ships going up and down the canel. The Envoy is filmed outbound and homeward. Also Pacific Unity/Northwest, Prince Line, Strict, Manchester Liners, Palm and many more. I have requested permission to copy some shots for this site,but had no reply. But worth buying.
Pete


http://www.cinerail.com/
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  #30  
Old 8th March 2011, 16:39
Tony Shaw Tony Shaw is offline  
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I too remember the times when only daylight navigation was allowed in the Manchester Ship Canal. As a young lad I used to stand on the island bullnose at Latchford Locks and looking down the canal towards the swing bridges there could be as many as four tug jobs inward bound. They were the days !. When I first married we bought a house at Stockton Heath, Warrington, right on the banks of the canal. Sitting up in bed we were parallel to the bridges of the larger ships and , on occasions, I would be able to give a wave to Ian Colquoun on a Manchester Liner and Brian Pownall on a Clan Liner. In those days all contact between tugs and vessel was by ship's whistle and, even though sounding off during the dark hours was frowned upon, certain of the pilots I knew would give a blast. Of course, I kept my neighbours in the dark !
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  #31  
Old 9th March 2011, 07:40
bob2bob bob2bob is offline  
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Tony the place for being kept awake, as you will remember was Dukesfield area of Runcorn it is right on the bridge hole if a ship cocked it up it was ships whistle to the stern tug, mouth whistle to the head tug, and the tugs replying on their own whistles especially old liberty ships loadedto 26ft, with no waft to drive itself, it could take ages. A lot of tugmen lived in this area so even of duty they still got bow and quarter orders. John
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  #32  
Old 12th October 2011, 15:45
Bart150 Bart150 is offline
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This may seem a simple question but I can't find the answer anywhere:
Which was the largest ship ever to go all the way up the Canal, and when did it happen?
Anybody know, or know where the answer may be found?
Thanks
Bart
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  #33  
Old 12th October 2011, 16:06
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Bart, as far as I know it was the M.V. Carchester, which used to run up to Brown and Polson's in Trafford Park from the late 1960's to the 1980's.
Photo here: https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/galler...hester/cat/510

Regards, Steve F.

Last edited by Flixtonian; 12th October 2011 at 16:10..
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  #34  
Old 12th October 2011, 17:03
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Originally Posted by Flixtonian View Post
Bart, as far as I know it was the M.V. Carchester, which used to run up to Brown and Polson's in Trafford Park from the late 1960's to the 1980's.
Photo here: https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/galler...hester/cat/510

Regards, Steve F.
I joined the s.s. Pacific Northwest as a deck apprentice in Salford one dark and rainy night in 1956. I believe she was built to just transit the canal. In some lock chambers, we had about 3" clearance each side so used 4 x 4 lumber on bridles to span the frames of the ship, all along each side. As we went into the chamber the 4" wood would be compressed to 3". Some of these fenders would break apart, some smoke from the heat generated by the friction, and some even catch fire. Needless to say, no steering needed, just dead slow ahead. Then the rush was on to re-rig serviceable fenders for the next lock. Was down and up the canal for the next 2 years or so. Only one overnight at Runcorn, close to the transporter bridge. Hot nightclub there, but can't remember the name. Never did see Mr. & Mrs. Ramsbotham with Albert their son trying to negotiate on the ferry fare of tuppence per person per trip, or part of per trip. I still remember watching the canal in Salford on a hot summer's day glubbing big fould smelling bubbles from the deep.
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  #35  
Old 13th October 2011, 05:51
JET JET is offline  
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Nobody has mentioned, as yet, the Bowater ships that were frequent users of the Canal.

John.
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  #36  
Old 13th October 2011, 16:15
Bart150 Bart150 is offline
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Thanks, everyone. Over on another thread I've just found the statement that ARMAGH and her sister ship NORTHUMBERLAND shared the honour of being the largest vessels ever to transit the entire length of the Manchester Ship Canal.
https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?t=13136
Elsewhere I've found that NORTHUMBERLAND's figures were: length 550' overall, 63' beam, 11,559 tons weight.
I'm wondering how this compares with the ships mentioned above: CARCHESTER, PACIFIC NORTHWEST and the Bowater ships.
Bart
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  #37  
Old 13th October 2011, 16:47
tom roberts tom roberts is offline  
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Sailed up and down the M.S.C. a few times on the Ardetta and the Dotrell unforunatley it was in summer months .oh my God I never got over the stink ,one time the whole canal lit up it was like watching methylated spirits being ignited,the only good thing was at Salford docks the famous Clewes Hotel one end and the beautifull River Mersey at the other,the last time I ventured onto it was on my narrow boat Chemainus named after a realy lovely port on Vancouver Island,on another ship I was on the Novelist we loaded drums of waste from Octel that we dumped over the side around Las Palmas later I worked at Octel as a rigger a truly awful place toxic as hell never saw a rat or even a seagull that was daft enough to go there.
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  #38  
Old 13th October 2011, 16:56
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Tom,
I was tied up at Octel once on a Blue Funnel ship, the Theseus, discharging lead ingots. We used to walk through the plant to go for a pint in Ellesmere Port every evening and what an eerie, strange place that was. They used to take your tobacco and matches off you before you could go ashore, or re-enter the plant, and warn you to stay well clear of certain reactors which contained a substance which could apparently kill an elephant at 200 yards.
A friend of mine worked in there and every few months was given a few weeks sick leave to get the lead out of his system, his gums used to turn blue!
He died in his fifties of lead poisoning.
Regards,
Pat
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  #39  
Old 13th October 2011, 17:05
Tony Shaw Tony Shaw is offline  
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As I've mentioned earlier in this thread, the smell of the canal in mid-summer was like Chanel No.5 to me, but imagine what it was like if you were on the sludge vessel "Mancunium" loading sewage (industrial waste !!) at Davyhulme. Two aromas for the price of one. Did this for a year. Classic !!
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  #40  
Old 13th October 2011, 18:47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bart150 View Post
Thanks, everyone. Over on another thread I've just found the statement that ARMAGH and her sister ship NORTHUMBERLAND shared the honour of being the largest vessels ever to transit the entire length of the Manchester Ship Canal.
https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?t=13136
Elsewhere I've found that NORTHUMBERLAND's figures were: length 550' overall, 63' beam, 11,559 tons weight.
I'm wondering how this compares with the ships mentioned above: CARCHESTER, PACIFIC NORTHWEST and the Bowater ships.
Bart
Can't tell you the numbers on the beam of the Pacific Northwest, but memory recalls 60+ feet. She was only about 515 - 520 feet in length though, so it seems the "Northumberland" fits the bill for biggest. The "Pacific No-rest" was just a little under 10,000 GRT if I remember rightly. Needless to say we were in a very light loading condition for both up and down the canal. She drew somewhere around 30 ft when down to he marks. (When leaving Glasgow with 120,000 cases of whisky aboard plus a whole bunch of other stuff like Rolls Royces, steel plate, nails, cotton waste, etc.)
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  #41  
Old 13th October 2011, 19:40
Jim S Jim S is offline   SN Supporter
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Lloyd's Register of Ships has Pacific Northwest as :-
Length Overall 501 ft - 2 in. Breadth Extreme (beam) 63 ft - 5 in.
The same dimensions are given for Pacific Reliance, Envoy and Stronghold.
The same dimension for beam at 63 ft - 5 inches is also listed for Pacific Fortune and Unity with a slightly less Length Overall of 498 ft - 6 in.
Ted Gray's book "A Hundred Years of the Manchester Ship Canal" gives the width of the canal locks as 65 feet and Furness Withy's Pacific Class were the widest vessels to negotiate the locks beyond the 80 feet Eastham Lock.
In 1954 Ropner's Swiftpool at 63 ft - 7 in. became the widest to transit the canal until surpassed in 1966 by Strick's Serbistan at 63 ft - 10 in. - I guess all give or take a coat of paint or three !
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  #42  
Old 13th October 2011, 20:54
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A lot of folk mention the smell.

Early 70's HMS Dundas or was it the Hardy? (Having a Craft Moment) We sailed from Portland with a Sargent Rowe and 6 Manchester Police cadets for a over night passage to you guessed Manchester. We had commenced our transist some time during the night. I awoke to Call the Hands and after morning ablutions stated to make my way to the galley to collect my breakfast. This required going to the upper deck where Sargent Rowe was stood. "Sorry about the smell boys, not the best approach to Manchester." said he.

"Can't smell a thing Sarge" said I, "I've just come out of the stokers mess mayhap I should be apologising to you"

Berthed in Trafford Wharf for four days and my introduction to Yattes Wine Lodge.

I nearly forgot we had to take the top part of the mast off prior to leaving Portland so that we could get under the Barton Bridge. Well she was a light weight single engined war canoe.
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Last edited by waldziu; 13th October 2011 at 21:00..
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  #43  
Old 17th October 2011, 10:24
Bart150 Bart150 is offline
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Thanks, everyone.
Bart
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  #44  
Old 17th October 2011, 20:21
tom roberts tom roberts is offline  
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Any one remember the big shoreside crane that used to take of the top of the funnel that was just up the canal from Eastham locks it was there for years when was it dismanteld?
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  #45  
Old 18th October 2011, 13:47
Tony Shaw Tony Shaw is offline  
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Yes, Tom, I remember it well, but not with affection !! I was down aft as second mate on the Harrison vessel "Dalesman", preparing to leave the crane berth after having used the crane, The after tug was pulling the stern off the quay, but, unfortunately, we still had a stern rope made fast. As quick aswe were trying to slack it off, it was getting tight again. The result was a parted stern rope and a broken femur for me landing me in hospital for 4 months and off work for eleven months. This happened on Dec.22nd !!!
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  #46  
Old 18th October 2011, 16:37
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Originally Posted by tom roberts View Post
Any one remember the big shoreside crane that used to take of the top of the funnel that was just up the canal from Eastham locks it was there for years when was it dismanteld?
There were thousands of names painted on that crane berth Tom, not just on the quay wall, but all over the buildings and the crasne and the rear wall. I added mine when on the Tactician.
regards,
Pat
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  #47  
Old 21st October 2011, 10:24
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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The ferry accident was at Thelwall,I lived nearby at Grappenhall,locally it was known as the Penny Ferry.The explosion killed the ferryman amongst others,it often smelt odd down there,mind you it was also a notorious courting spot so we must have been determined to use it!
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  #48  
Old 21st October 2011, 10:29
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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This site revives so many forotten memories.Durin one of those romanticall related spells ashore I was working at Fords in Halewood and my lift from home used to pick me up at Latchford.It was dark,cold and miserable as I stood waiting,then like a vision a Manchester Liner cruised by,her saloon brightly lit and being laid up by white jacketed stewards.It looked so warm and cosy I thought of all the lads getting ready to go home on leave and I said to myself`I`m going back`and I did.
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  #49  
Old 22nd October 2011, 03:13
liverbob liverbob is offline  
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sailed out of the man canal twice at nite time.once on the
pacific liberty nov 53. and the other on the javenese prince
jan 60.the mersey ferries still do trips up the canal/when
i went back to liverpool to see our families .i done a trip
up the canal.it was great.
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  #50  
Old 22nd October 2011, 17:03
John Arton John Arton is offline  
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In the 80's my sister lived on the Hill in Frodsham and when I used to visit her I would often wonder what it would be like to go up the MSC. Forward to the 90's and the MSC becomes almost my 2nd home, trotting up as far as Cadishead with Stolt's.
I found the whole canal an experience not to be forgotten and every trip found out more about what a fantastic piece of engineering it was. I had Latvian Officers under me and a number of them too became quite interested in the Canal and its history.
Sure, it was a long drag from the Bar all the way up to Cadishead, especially as the Liverpool pilots seemed to insist on boarding far too early at the Bar so you would have to creep up the Mersey and dodge around off the Bar at Eastham channel, etc. But the MSC pilots with their knowledge and friendliness made up for it and the passage from Eastham onwards was invariably a pleasure.
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