Manchester Ship Canal - Page 3 - Ships Nostalgia
17:14

Welcome
Welcome!Welcome to Ships Nostalgia, the world's greatest online community for people worldwide with an interest in ships and shipping. Whether you are crew, ex-crew, ship enthusiasts or cruisers, this is the forum for you. And what's more, it's completely FREE.

Click here to go to the forums home page and find out more.
Click here to join.
Log in
User Name Password

Manchester Ship Canal

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #51  
Old 13th November 2011, 11:42
Blackal's Avatar
Blackal Blackal is offline  
Senior Member
Department: Engineering
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 2,822
I occasionally travelled up the ship canal on my summer holidays with my father on the Denholms ore carriers.

We berthed at Irlam, if I remember correctly - and at the age of 8, had never seen rows and rows of red brick terraced houses before. The biggest surprise was getting fish and chips locally........

fish with skin attached! Mushy peas! - couldn't understand that one, especially...

I remember kids used to drop bricks down the funnel though - from the bridges

Al
Reply With Quote
  #52  
Old 14th November 2011, 16:57
Jocko Jocko is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1958 - 1963
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 280
Many moons ago I paid off in Liverpool. Had a good bevy with my old shipmates in a bar in Lime St station. I then caught a train for Matlock Bath to visit my brother. With all the beer in me I fell asleep on the train. Some time later I woke up and there was a ship in the the middle of a field behind a hedge!!!!!!!! I thought I had the D.T.s.
Reply With Quote
  #53  
Old 14th June 2012, 11:00
robertpmc robertpmc is offline  
Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Deck
Active: 1966 - 1979
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 13
Hi,
The skipper of the Tacoma then was John Fairclough of Liverpool and his son - also John Fairclough, was mate. I'd left about 6 months or so before the explosion and tragic fatalities. Both John's were nice fellas and had been good old hands to me (13yr old deck boy) but they argued a lot (as families do!) and would put me between them. I'd be wearing out the haliard with hoisting the house flag up and down like a whores drawers; "Who told you to hoist that flag?" says the Mate, "The skipper" says I. "Take it down" says the Mate. "Why's that flag not up?" says the skipper..and on..and on.....

Robert Setz
Reply With Quote
  #54  
Old 14th June 2012, 11:32
Barrie Youde Barrie Youde is online now  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 6,763
#50

Hi, John,

Getting under way early for Eastham was as much an irritation for Liverpool pilots as for anybody else. The need arose from the limited time available for the docking of largish ships at Eastham (i.e. from high-water until the ebb had fallen to a point where there was insufficient UKC in Eastham Channel). Obviously this was variable on draught, but it was rarely more than about two and a half hours. If several draught-restricted ships were due to dock within that period it was essential not only that the deepest went first, but also that the lesser-draughted ships, in strict turn, were queuing ship-to-ship for the lock, stemming the ebb-tide as closely as possible, in order that no time was then lost.

At less busy times, of course, the problem was less acute; but nobody wasted time in Eastham Channel by choice. And nobody would dare delay the man behind him. Timing was the key to the whole thing.

Hope this might explain it a bit.
Reply With Quote
  #55  
Old 17th December 2015, 13:50
callpor callpor is offline   SN Supporter
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Deck
Active: 1962 - Present
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
My location
Posts: 763
Barry,

Having just finished and enjoyed reading Nick Robin's recent book "The Ships that came to Manchester", I needed to pick up on a few points, so not only searched the Forum for this thread, but also looked back in my own records. Between 1972 and 1979 I made 35 return transits of the canal, generally all the way to Esso at ModeWheel, as 2/0 up to Master, so this book brought back a lot of memories.

Your post #54 brought back one of these in sharp focus: It was on the Esso Purfleet fully loaded inward and fourth ship on the tide inside the bar on the Eastham Channel with our UKC disappearing at an alarming rate. The Mersey Pilot (If I recall correctly it was John Tebay) and I, as Master, got so concerned when it reduced to 1 foot that we steamed the vessel into QEII lock and waited for the next tide! Caused quite a kurfuffle afterwards and a change in the regulations about vessels crossing Eastham bar into the Channel.

Nick Robin's book quotes the Strick vessel "Serbistan" as the largest to transit the whole canal on a regular basis, she had a beam of 63' 10". I had been led to believe it was the "Carchester", which had the largest DWT at 14625. But apparently these were all beaten by the 'Northumberland' at LOA 550' Beam 63' although her DWT was only 11559. Whichever was really the largest, it was always a grind if one of these monsters was on the tide for Manchester as we would then be stuck with a 12 hour transit to ModeWheel.

Only disappointing thing about Nick Robin's book was his failure to include a chapter about the Pilots and Helmsmen. They could have added a lot more colour to what really is a chronology of facts, clearly elicited from company and MSC records.

Happy days..... Chris
Reply With Quote
  #56  
Old 17th December 2015, 14:31
Barrie Youde Barrie Youde is online now  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 6,763
Hi, Chris,

You were lucky that QEII Lock was open!!

Sadly, John Tebay is no longer with us. He crossed the Bar in 2002.

Best,

BY
Reply With Quote
  #57  
Old 17th December 2015, 18:58
tom roberts tom roberts is online now  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 1,898
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pat Kennedy View Post
Yes they do. Starting on April 20th and running until mid October they run every week. A great day out, I did one last year and enjoyed it immensely.
Details are at this link;

http://www.merseyferries.co.uk/Conte...alCruises.aspx
Pat on the ferries did you see the report in the echo that they are considering closing either the Woodside or Seacome it's beyond all comprehension that the Birkenhead ferries leave its home it's madness.Returning to the canal topic besides the British and Contintnental boats I sailed on the biggest ship l went up the canal was the Hyria paid of her in Stanlow after7months.
Reply With Quote
  #58  
Old 17th December 2015, 20:19
Pat Kennedy's Avatar
Pat Kennedy Pat Kennedy is online now  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 13,877
[quote=tom roberts;1780178]Pat on the ferries did you see the report in the echo that they are considering closing either the Woodside or Seacome it's beyond all comprehension that the Birkenhead ferries leave its home it's madness.

Its the bean counters at work again Tom, and no doubt they will get their way eventually.
If one of the ferry terminals is to close, then logically it should be Woodside, because there is the adjacent Merseyrail station at Hamillton Square, and a couple of bus routes through the nearby tunnel, to take commuters to and from Liverpool.
Seacombe only has the ferry.
Possibly Peel Ports could be persuaded to take an interest in the ferry service as part of their vaulting ambition for the arera.
regards,
Pat
Reply With Quote
  #59  
Old 17th December 2015, 21:46
sidsal sidsal is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 1,429
In the immediate post war era we used to got to Stanlow to discharge (T2 tankers mainly)> we would normally have called at Avonmouth ( from Aruba usually) to lighten the draft. We used to play tricks in order to satay overnight as no tankers traversed at night. Typical was when pilot cme aboard and master urged us to hurry up and finish the disharge. By craftily cracking open a few vales we would send the oil round and round the ship with little going ashore. A compliant shore chap would loose the disc showing rate of discharge.
In the 60's or 70's I had gone to Trafford wharf to view som timber baulks from some silos which were being demolished and saw a Clan boat depart.. I believe I saw the very last ship depart Manchester docks.
Years ago a little vessel started 2 day cruises up the Weaver from Runcorn and it amused me. I pictured being asked if we were going on a cruise this year and replying in the affirmative. On being asked we were going from Southampton I would say - No- Runcorn. And on being asked if we would call at some exotic ports I would say - Yes - Northwich !!
In ww2 I sailed with a chap who knew loads of sea ditties and one long one was about a young lad going to sea on his first voyage with his mother dead worried. It turned out he was going up the ship canal to Manchester. I can only remember snippets -
"And we set sail from Walton Jail
Along the ship canal
When we got up to Runcorn Bridge
The rain began to snow
The wind blew out the candle light
And the engines wouldn't go
I have tried unsuccessfully to get the whole words as it was a corker
Reply With Quote
  #60  
Old 18th December 2015, 00:03
Barrie Youde Barrie Youde is online now  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 6,763
#59

There is another brilliant ditty somewhere about putting out to sea from Manchester, the words of which sadly escape me - The Manchester Mariner/Navigator or something similar, largely invoking the perils of the sea between Mode Wheel and Latchford, as Stanley Holloway might have expressed them. Another corker!
Reply With Quote
  #61  
Old 18th December 2015, 00:47
Basil's Avatar
Basil Basil is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1962 - 1964
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 3,920
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pat Kennedy
Its the bean counters at work again Tom, and no doubt they will get their way eventually.
I wasn't in the MN long enough to grow old and rail at beancounters in the Merch but we certainly did in civil aviation.
The reality is that if the numbers don't add up you're out of business so the beancounters do have a point.
I'm just in from pub where I was chatting to an Easy Jet pilot and we were discussing the business models of Ryan Air and Easy Jet. It's a dog eat dog jungle BUT, esp in this internet world of rapid communication, if you piss off your customers enough you are history. At the moment my money would be on Easy but their pilots work hard.
If you have a job which buys you a house and, more or less, keeps 'er happy then you are well ahead of the game.
Bit under the affluence of incohol so usual caveats apply
Reply With Quote
  #62  
Old 18th December 2015, 01:04
Basil's Avatar
Basil Basil is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1962 - 1964
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 3,920
Oh, yes this is about the MSC.
I returned up the canal from my first trip to sea on the MV British Monarch and paid off at the age of 19 on 26MAR1962.
I still recollect trying to start a steam pump to top up some random salt water tank and it appeared that the discharge valve had been closed by someone more experienced than I. I inferred this from the black leakage from the piston rod seal which looked like the urine of the Devil but was, in fact, MSC water.

We docked at Spillers Wharf to discharge grain.

Many years later, in a different life, I stayed at The Copthorne Hotel at Salford Quays close to, but on the other side of the canal from, my first visit.
The lady who ran the local filling station still had a pickaxe handle behind the counter.
Reply With Quote
  #63  
Old 18th December 2015, 02:33
spongebob's Avatar
spongebob spongebob is offline
Spongebob
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1957 - 1961
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 8,822
Basil, you mention your ship MV British Monarch. Was she the ship that the Second Mate fell overboard after the midnight to four am watch and was recovered from the sea more than twelve hours later?
I started a thread a few years back referring to such an incident on a Port line ship. But I am sure I was corrected to the above vessel being involved.
Do you know this story?

Bob
__________________
spongebob,
Reply With Quote
  #64  
Old 18th December 2015, 14:53
Basil's Avatar
Basil Basil is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1962 - 1964
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 3,920
spongebob,

That's correct, the 2nd Mate, who had, I think, gone aft to check the log, fell over the stern.
http://www.mrmsw.co.uk/story%202%20s...es%20hell.html

That happened on 9th June 1957 whilst another British Monarch claim to fame was taking place:
Victoria Drummond was, from April to November 1957, her 2/E.
In addition to being the first woman marine engineer in Britain and first woman member of The Institute of Marine Engineers she was also a god-daughter of Queen Victoria.
https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showth...light=Drummond
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria_Drummond


Bit of further info:
https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/archiv...hp?t-8906.html
Quote:
Mick Spear
26th October 2011, 11:52
Coming in a little late on this thread but have just read the posts. I was on British Monarch when this happened and was on 12-4 watch with Doug as apprentice. He went aft to clean the contacts on the log transmitter which was mounted on a bracket attached to the bulwark. Ship took a roll as he was leaning out and over he went. He held on to the log line for a while and shouted but the only people awake were the 4-8 watchkeepers and they were too far away to hear.
He was missed at breakfast and when he failed to show on the bridge for morning sights, ship was searched and then turned around about 0900 and steamed back along our track. Against all the odds he was spotted about half a mile abeam about 1300 - kicking and splashing to attract attention in the chop. We nearly missed him - he thought we had until he heard our whistle sound. When our boat picked him up, he was still wearing his shoes and climbed up the pilot ladder to the deck without assistance. Apart from being badly sunburned and stung by portuguese man o war's, he was in great shape after nine hours in the water. Doug got a bit religious after that - hardly surprising. He was a good shipmate and a talented guy. Always had a project going - built a dinghy out of scrap dunnage once.
The old man was Capt Coutts and he was awarded a citation and a sextant for his success in estimating wind and current to bring us back to the position. Even he admitted though that there was a whole lot of luck involved.
I finished up my time as 3rd. Mate on British Monarch before going on to take my 2nd.Mates ticket and moving on to Denholm's. Lost touch with most of the crew of course including Doug, so would be interested to hear if any of them are still around.

Fascinating stuff! Great read. Imagine what was going through Doug's mind whilst he was in the water. I'm impressed with the navigational skills that enabled his safe rescue.
mick S

Last edited by Basil; 18th December 2015 at 15:05..
Reply With Quote
  #65  
Old 18th December 2015, 21:19
Laurie Ridyard Laurie Ridyard is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Deck
Active: 1959 - 1976
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 559
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Shaw View Post
I've been wanting to put a thread out re-the Manchester Ship Canal for some time now but never got round to it. As a young lad I was never away from Latchford Locks, living in Warrington, and when I eventually went to sea I went up and down the canal several times. Leaving deep sea ,I spent a year on the Manchester sludge boat "Mancunium", after which I became lockmaster at Latchford Locks. After 8 years I returned to seagoing and went up and down it yet again on Harrison Line vessels. Unlike the majority of people I thought gthe canal was one of wonders of the world. (I even liked the smell of the water in summer !!!) It would be nice to hear of from those who have experienced the pleasures (or displeasures) of transitting 'the big ditch'
Hi! Tony !
Were you on the sludge boats with Roy Lomas ? He's an ol' mate of mine. We were in the same Scout Troop together [ 2nd/218th Manchester St. Nicholas Burnage.] He tried to join Hain SS Co. a long with our mate Frank Lovegrove. He ventually joined Bank Line.

I am still in contact with him....


Laurie Ridyard.
Reply With Quote
  #66  
Old 18th December 2015, 21:27
Laurie Ridyard Laurie Ridyard is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Deck
Active: 1959 - 1976
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 559
Ha!

I went up and down the Canal several times in 1962, whilst 3/0 of M.V.
" Trevean " At this time the Canal was supposed to be getting healthy, as firms were being stopped from dumping waste water in it.

We had a donkey greaser who used to put a fishing line over the side at practically every port we went to. I don't think I ever saw him catch anything.

We persuaded him that the Canal had so improved that he could fish in it, so he put his line over. I bought a frazen trout and stuck it on the end of his line !!!

I do understand the story made the MEN.


Laurie Ridyard.
Reply With Quote
  #67  
Old 18th December 2015, 23:34
spongebob's Avatar
spongebob spongebob is offline
Spongebob
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1957 - 1961
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 8,822
Basil, Mick, it all comes back to me now.
Go to thread Ship Research/ 12/2007/ my thread Port line drama where I mistakenly posted this event under the incorrect ships name.
It is sad to hear that the second mate passed away relative ly early , especially after surviving the unsurviveable in most men's terms.

Bob
__________________
spongebob,
Reply With Quote
  #68  
Old 19th December 2015, 17:38
Tonykshaw Tonykshaw is offline  
Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Deck
Active: 1959 - 2007
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 35
Sorry Laurie, I never knew Roy Lomas, was on the "Mancunium" around 1965, before becoming Lockmaster at Latchford Locks a year later. After several years I returned to the Merch., serving with Harrison's, Esso and RMC.
Reply With Quote
  #69  
Old 31st December 2015, 20:28
CAPT.BOB's Avatar
CAPT.BOB CAPT.BOB is offline  
Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Deck
Active: 1959 - 1998
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 59
I've just returned to Ship's nostalgia after a couple of years absence,so bear with me.
Back in the 60's while working for Furness Withy/Prince Line I made many canal transits on Pacific boats before going up to top off the holds with Whiskey in Glasgow,or returning from the Medi in the Prince Line ships. I joined the Mystic there in 1961,before going to Australia via Glasgow,and in 1960 I spent Christmas transiting on the Pacific Northwest.We sailed from Manchester at I think 1630 on Christmas Eve.Tied up for the night while the Pilot went home and completed the transit on Christmas afternoon.HAPPY DAYS!!
Reply With Quote
  #70  
Old 10th January 2016, 17:19
para handy clyde para handy clyde is offline  
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 23
I sailed up the Canal on M.V Oremina(houlders)to berth at Irlam1967.My first Ship.I sailed up again on M.V.Saint Aiden(gardeners) as far as Salford.
It is great having sites like Ships Nostalgia as it brings back some great memories.When ever I am asked if I would have changed my decision to go to sea If I could turn back time,my answer would be no.I loved my time in the Merchant Navy(Good and sometimes Bad)I would do it all again given the Chance.
Reply With Quote
  #71  
Old 10th January 2016, 19:05
kudu kudu is offline  
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 96
I sailed up the canal a number of times during the mid1960's,with Stag Line.It was always Brown and Polsons warfe,with wheat from the USA or Canada.There was always the smell of corn oil and glycerine at Brown and Polsons corn processing plant,once smelt,never forgotten.Apart from the odour of the canal itself,I remember the ore ships at Irlam,and tying up at Runcorn for the night(can't remember why),and going for a couple of pints.I remember the Trafford hotel,a good walk through Trafford park,from the warfe,and then a taxi into the city centre,and a few pints in the Long Bar,and an Indian curry in the Kuhinor.We often moaned about our life in the MN,but the memories are good,and remain strong,even after fifty years.
Reply With Quote
  #72  
Old 23rd June 2016, 17:52
George A George A is offline  
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by tom roberts View Post
Sailed up and down the M.S.C. a few times on the Ardetta and the Dotrell unforunatley it was in summer months .oh my God I never got over the stink ,one time the whole canal lit up it was like watching methylated spirits being ignited,the only good thing was at Salford docks the famous Clewes Hotel one end and the beautifull River Mersey at the other,the last time I ventured onto it was on my narrow boat Chemainus named after a realy lovely port on Vancouver Island,on another ship I was on the Novelist we loaded drums of waste from Octel that we dumped over the side around Las Palmas later I worked at Octel as a rigger a truly awful place toxic as hell never saw a rat or even a seagull that was daft enough to go there.
Did you sail on the Ardetta of British & COntinental, Tom?
Reply With Quote
  #73  
Old 24th June 2016, 10:52
Tonykshaw Tonykshaw is offline  
Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Deck
Active: 1959 - 2007
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 35
I sailed up the canal on the "Novelist" Tom and on almost every other Harrison Line vessel, mostly whilst with 'Dad's Army'. Sorry, but I loved that smell, but I was brought up on it ������
Reply With Quote
  #74  
Old 4th December 2016, 17:11
Waterways Waterways is offline  
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 47
Above Runcorn the MSC is rarely used. From Eastham to Runcorn it is well used, being a linear dock. Peel Ports, the owners, are trying to promote the canal with not much success. They propose Port Warrington and Port Salford but nothing is happening. Tesco take wine up the canal from Seaforth to the wine bottling plant and a few others as well use the canal for other cargoes. But that is 30 miles of deep water canal from Runcorn to near Manchester with locks that need maintaining and manning. I believe the section from Eastham to Runcorn pay for the rest of the canal.

I read a suggestion for HS3, the Liverpool to Hull high-speed rail line, to fill in the canal, or just drain it and use it for the high-speed railway's trackbed. TfN have recommended a new line into Liverpool to alleviate the rail for freight for the new Superport. The MSC is a straight direct route between the two cities not requiring a landtake and no inconvenience to anybody. No inquires, court cases, etc. Sounds sensible to me. The likes of Tesco can have a railhead built to receive the bulk wine. It will be a nostalgia killer but highly practical. The Runcorn to Manchester section's days are near over. Which prompts the question of why it was ever built in the first place.

Last edited by Waterways; 5th December 2016 at 16:53..
Reply With Quote
  #75  
Old 5th December 2016, 11:51
PeterMoore PeterMoore is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Deck
Active: 1972 - 1984
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 431
Loaded 2x 61t heavy lifts at Irlam on Saturday - see photo.
Discharged in Liverpool on Sunday to connect with a main-line ship to Korea.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg WP_20161203_15_51_09_Pro-1200.jpg (73.7 KB, 41 views)
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Manchester Ship Canal Tug Arrow beaches Tugs 5 5th August 2009 08:13
Manchester Ship Canal odditys dicamus Coasters 5 22nd August 2005 21:24



Support SN


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.1.0 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.