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H series Shell tankers

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  #26  
Old 13th May 2013, 22:25
oldman 80 oldman 80 is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davidrwarwick View Post
Could it have been Isomeria, sister ship of Isocardia (Bangkok), also jumboised, built 1956 scrapped 1975.

More details :-

http://www.helderline.nl/tanker/339/isomeria+(1)/

Dave
It could very well have been. Built 1956 - yes that would be about right. Sister to Bangkok - almost certainly, although I personally did not sail on the Bangkok. Scrapped 1975 - well the Bangkok may have been scrapped in 75 but not the Siam. She departed Teesport in late January 1976 - for FOS I believe.
She was at that time destined for scrapping, but just how soon after her departure from Teesport that occurred I am not sure - but it certainly wasn't a long time after.
Captain Malcolm Cameron was in command when she left Teesport and from what I remember he told me in emails in 2001, he was relieved in Fos.
From that info, if my memory is correct, a new master must have joined her in February 1976. From that point in time she could have been scrapped at any time - I have a feeling (but only a feeling) it was maybe as much as 12 - 18 months later.
If she was indeed the Isomeria originally, then it seems Shell had an "I" class as well. However my memory still says her (Siam's)original name started with an "H". I wouldn't guarantee that memory is correct, but I am fairly sure that it is.
The black and white photo on the website you have given looks very much like her (the DSM " Siam") for sure.

Last edited by oldman 80; 13th May 2013 at 22:37.. Reason: Insertion of DSM before Siam - last line.
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  #27  
Old 14th May 2013, 00:41
Malky Glaister Malky Glaister is offline  
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If my memory serves me correctly, both Siam and Bangkok were French in a previous existance. Their names I do not know however I seem to recall that they were both equipped with wine tanks when handed over to DSM promoting much amusement elsewhere in the fleet at the time and wonderment as to how long this would last.
They were steamers, I don't suppose there are too many engineers still with us who sailed on them.

Glad to see you back Oldman 80!!

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Malky
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  #28  
Old 14th May 2013, 00:50
Malky Glaister Malky Glaister is offline  
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Anyone interested in ISOMERIA etc can visit HELDERLINE website were they will find a couple of pics.
Hope this helps, there is a brief history but no mention of Siam or Bangkok but jumbisation (what a word) is mentioned.

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Malky
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  #29  
Old 14th May 2013, 05:18
oldman 80 oldman 80 is offline  
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Originally Posted by Malky Glaister View Post
If my memory serves me correctly, both Siam and Bangkok were French in a previous existance. Their names I do not know however I seem to recall that they were both equipped with wine tanks when handed over to DSM promoting much amusement elsewhere in the fleet at the time and wonderment as to how long this would last.
They were steamers, I don't suppose there are too many engineers still with us who sailed on them.

Glad to see you back Oldman 80!!

regards

Malky
Oh yes - you are quite right there Malky.
Steam indeed they were. I can't remember the names of many of the engineers, apart from Andy Milne who was third - and a real good hard working bloke. The chief was ex R.N. and not very interested in commercial commitments/obligations etc.,
I believe Andy ended up in the North Sea as an OIM on some rigs or platforms - or so Malcolm Cameron advised me by email in 2001.
When I paid off in Teesport, Derek Conway was joining as 2nd Engineer. He sailed with me later as Chief on one of the large H.K. Ore/Oilers.
After Malcolm Cameron joined I went day work (we had plenty of guys on board) - and spent most of my days in the pumproom which was something of disaster area. God those pumps were a problem, as indeed was the pipework, the cargo hydraulics, and pretty much everything else.
However she was the only ship I ever sailed in with a high expansion foam generator serving the pumproom. It was really impressive. I tested it one day (the intention was to be a very brief test) but after starting the water flow (Fire & GS p/p) I cracked open the foam valve to verify flow from the tank, and the wheel came off in my hand. (The spindle broke off in the gland)
I reckon it took about two minutes and no more to fill the pumproom
from bottom to top and out through the doors and the vents, and then it continued along the deck. By the time I got to an operational telephone, and someone down below answered it - it was too late - the foam tank was empty. The pumproom remained full for several days, before the foam finally subsided. It was true what they said about the stuff, you could walk into it, stay there and survive. In fact it was almost a pleasant experience - quite soothing I remember, - breathing in it was no problem at all, and it didn't even feel wet. Truly Amazing stuff.
The alleged wine tanks - yes that rings a bell also - they were in the stores below the midship's castle/accommodation block. I think they were used for Kerosene, or something along those lines, under DSM.
We did one voyage from the Gulf to Australia - Geelong and Sydney and another to the U.K.
Both the Livingstone brothers attended in Geelong - the boiler refractories had collapsed and the water tubes were in a really bad way.
Repairs took several days, (about 10, I think) during which I took off up the road to Melbourne in a borrowed car to stock up with some 4 litre casks of the best of Dan Murphies wines and port.
It was pretty cheap in those days, and tasted as good as any French stuff - probably better, in fact.
In 2001, (25/26 years later) when corresponding with Malcolm Cameron by email he was still ranting on about it, and as far as I could gather, had tracked down a supplier in the U.K. (He was retired by then, and seemingly still in good health, kicking up hell because the council wouldn't cut the grass near his house).
It was a good drop of stuff for sure (Dan Murphies) - especially the Port which we consumed with our coffee at nights, whilst engaged in Malcolm's nightly Scrabble session which invariably lasted to midnight. He seldom lost a game. (There was a coffee percolator in his day room)
Vic (Yeah, Yeah, Yeah) Green was Chief Steward, most of the time I was on board, - I expect you came across him in the past.
She certainly wasn't the best Denholm feeder, but not bad, I suppose.
Although a bit of a wreck, I quite enjoyed my time on her, - it was certainly interesting, that's for sure, and there was always plenty to do.
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  #30  
Old 14th May 2013, 05:19
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BlythSpirit BlythSpirit is offline  
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Quote:
but jumbisation (what a word) is mentioned.
The word is jumboisation ( still quite a word!!)
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  #31  
Old 14th May 2013, 05:54
Malky Glaister Malky Glaister is offline  
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Oh I missed out an O !!

Cheers Blythspirit

regards

Malky
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  #32  
Old 14th May 2013, 13:31
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Miramar would suggest ISANDA, built 1955 Atlantique 31997 DWT 201.2 m LOA 25.6m beam, enlarged 1966 62206 DWT 239.8m LOA 31m beam Broken up 1976 Kaoshung.

Increasing the length is not unusual but the beam - now that must have been interesting - I think this is mentioned elsewhere on this site.
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  #33  
Old 14th May 2013, 23:34
oldman 80 oldman 80 is offline  
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Originally Posted by Duncan112 View Post
Miramar would suggest ISANDA, built 1955 Atlantique 31997 DWT 201.2 m LOA 25.6m beam, enlarged 1966 62206 DWT 239.8m LOA 31m beam Broken up 1976 Kaoshung.

Increasing the length is not unusual but the beam - now that must have been interesting - I think this is mentioned elsewhere on this site.
"Interesting" - sure is the word.
A prominent "Notch" at a particularly badly corroded area.
Always a bit of a worry particularly during adverse weather.
Most noticeable standing on centreline abaft wheelhouse looking aft, as I remember it.

Edit: The Jumboised dwt you indicate may be correct - but I have a feeling it was nearer the 70000 though (68206 ? maybe)
or possibly even, the 70000 was "displacement" although I am inclined to think not - Dwt was always the figure most likely to stick in my mind except for vessels where draft surveys were the order of the day.
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  #34  
Old 15th May 2013, 02:05
oldman 80 oldman 80 is offline  
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Originally Posted by Malky Glaister View Post
Oh I missed out an O !!

Cheers Blythspirit

regards

Malky
Best just ignore him Malky - I think we all know his game.
The type Commissioner Borthwick A.O./ P.S.M. of the Montara Enquiry became particularly switched on to.
Perhaps even "the dots" are beginning to join up, - the trail is a long one, - believe me.
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  #35  
Old 15th May 2013, 05:01
Malky Glaister Malky Glaister is offline  
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When I was a phase 3 engineering apprentice at Springburn Tech Glasgow in 1967 there were a good number of Shell apprentices who had been to sea for a year. us J&J lads had not yet set sail.
We were regaled with stories of "H" boats and "V" boats etc. Ships that are recalled are Haustellum and Hygromia and Volsella.

Tales of Aruba, Curacao and the Happy Valley. ( Campo Alegre??) enthralled us!

I wonder what hapened to those chaps. We all had a fine time at Springburn!

regards

Malky
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  #36  
Old 15th May 2013, 08:11
oldman 80 oldman 80 is offline  
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Originally Posted by Malky Glaister View Post
When I was a phase 3 engineering apprentice at Springburn Tech Glasgow in 1967 there were a good number of Shell apprentices who had been to sea for a year. us J&J lads had not yet set sail.
We were regaled with stories of "H" boats and "V" boats etc. Ships that are recalled are Haustellum and Hygromia and Volsella.

Tales of Aruba, Curacao and the Happy Valley. ( Campo Alegre??) enthralled us!

I wonder what hapened to those chaps. We all had a fine time at Springburn!

regards

Malky
Hmm - I see.
Something "strange" going on / went on here, - me thinks.
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  #37  
Old 15th May 2013, 08:45
davidrwarwick davidrwarwick is offline  
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Helderline sites state Isanda was discarded by Shell France in 1973 and renamed Siam and scrapped in Kaosiung in 1976 :-

http://www.helderline.nl/tanker/342/isanda/

Thats got to be it Oldman!

Dave
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  #38  
Old 15th May 2013, 10:31
oldman 80 oldman 80 is offline  
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Originally Posted by davidrwarwick View Post
Helderline sites state Isanda was discarded by Shell France in 1973 and renamed Siam and scrapped in Kaosiung in 1976 :-

http://www.helderline.nl/tanker/342/isanda/

Thats got to be it Oldman!

Dave
I reckon it is.
When she was sold / discarded to TOTCO and renamed Siam that is when DSM would have taken on the vessels management and Training of the Thai's.
I seem to recall it was the Thais first venture into commercial tanker Ops, and maybe even, commercial deep sea shipping of any kind.
The wording "discarded" is interesting in itself.
Rather unusual - don't you think ?
Anyhow the rear end didn't "drop off" in the night ( as we feared,) before she reached the breakers yard. Engineers, crew and cooks all lived down aft.
Something similar happened to the Kirki - early 1990's, but in that case it was the bow that dropped off, but at least no one was living up there.
Bad days - so they were. Some Classification Societies just were not doing their jobs.

Edit: I note that helderline nl website gives her an IMO Number. That too is strange considering IMO Nos. did not exist in those days.
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  #39  
Old 15th May 2013, 11:40
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Originally Posted by oldman 80 View Post
Something similar happened to the Kirki - early 1990's, but in that case it was the bow that dropped off, but at least no one was living up there.
Bad days - so they were. Some Classification Societies just were not doing their jobs.
Which reminds me - been on here a few times before but always raises a giggle for me http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WcU4t6zRAKg
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  #40  
Old 15th May 2013, 12:20
oldman 80 oldman 80 is offline  
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Sorry guys #29 (Spelling)
For Dan Murphies read Dan Murphy.

Was the Kirki a Shell "Discard" - I wonder.
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  #41  
Old 15th May 2013, 13:52
oldman 80 oldman 80 is offline  
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Which reminds me - been on here a few times before but always raises a giggle for me http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WcU4t6zRAKg
Not for me though - just too many losses from that era.
Dark, Dark, Days - so they were.
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  #42  
Old 15th May 2013, 14:04
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Not so much the accident to the ship for one cannot make light of an incident that either causes death injury or damages the environment OM but the way the politician dodges the question - I hear it every morning on Radio 4 and usually end up bellowing at the radio
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  #43  
Old 16th May 2013, 23:29
oldman 80 oldman 80 is offline  
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Not so much the accident to the ship for one cannot make light of an incident that either causes death injury or damages the environment OM but the way the politician dodges the question - I hear it every morning on Radio 4 and usually end up bellowing at the radio
O.K. Duncan - thank you for that clear clarification of your meaning.
I'm with you on that - absolutely 100%

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  #44  
Old 12th June 2013, 17:18
LucyKnight LucyKnight is offline
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H series Shell tankers

Sailed on Hemitrochus as radio officer on her last voyage ending up in Taiwan end of 1977 after a final lube oil charter in far East. One skin of her hull had apparently rusted thru, no air conditioning working so radio room became very hot. There had been a fire in her main engine when we had left Black sea and over 100 tubes burnted out,which the engineers had to fix at sea. We limped thru the Gib straits at a few knots and when she blew here tubes it just about blacked the strait out. It was an interesting trip though.
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  #45  
Old 19th June 2013, 05:59
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I would think it nigh on impossible to jumboize a 19,000 DWT vessel to 70,000DWT. Shell did it with Z class ships from 38,000DWT
3/O in the Zaphon 1959 she was 39,??? dot and later jumboised. Part of her was later used as a barge in the attachment of clip ons to the Auckland Harbour Bridge. Always thought Shell were pretty good with pollution control, they were the initiators of the 'Load on top' practice, maybe a stopgap but in the right direction.
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  #46  
Old 19th June 2013, 06:58
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3/O in the Zaphon 1959 she was 39,??? dot and later jumboised. Part of her was later used as a barge in the attachment of clip ons to the Auckland Harbour Bridge. Always thought Shell were pretty good with pollution control, they were the initiators of the 'Load on top' practice, maybe a stopgap but in the right direction.
Well " load on top " sure was a step in the right direction. I always thought it was Chevron who initiated it - but I could be wrong.
However nothing could beat the introduction of Inert Gas and Crude Oil Washing - those things were enormous steps in the right direction. Indeed, revolutionary I'd suggest.
Shell certainly needed the IG back in the late 60's and early 70's.
Just too many of their VLCC's blowing their tank decks off - just like that. I remember the image of one of them, the tank deck opened up and folded back over the bridge - not unlike a sardine can..
When tank sizes reached the 10,000 cubic metres - things really got nasty when tank cleaning - until IG systems became common place.
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  #47  
Old 26th November 2013, 12:09
michaelF michaelF is offline  
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Nearly missed this thread,
sailed as second mate on the SS Siam(ON 169987) with denholms from Nov 74 at Teesport to Jan 75 Capetown.
We had the ex Thai air force pilots on board , one of them Pratcha (spelling) paid off with me and came for a meal at my cousins house just outside Capetown before flying home next day.

This was a memorable trip for many reasons .

mike
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  #48  
Old 27th November 2013, 12:06
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[ I remember the image of one of them, the tank deck opened up and folded back over the bridge - not unlike a sardine can..
When tank sizes reached the 10,000 cubic metres - things really got nasty when tank cleaning - until IG systems became common place.[/QUOTE]

Mactra and Marpessa
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  #49  
Old 27th November 2013, 12:58
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First trip Nav. Cad. on ss Hemimactra, joined 17th December 1969 in Gothenburg, when the Mactra incident happened.
Mother, bless her, was on the phone to Shell Centre when she heard the news to confirm the name of the "boat" which was in trouble as she was a bit concerned.
"Madam," she was told, "we do not have boats, we have ships!"
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  #50  
Old 30th November 2013, 15:04
LucyKnight LucyKnight is offline
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Mac

Quote:
Originally Posted by vasco View Post
[ I remember the image of one of them, the tank deck opened up and folded back over the bridge - not unlike a sardine can..
When tank sizes reached the 10,000 cubic metres - things really got nasty when tank cleaning - until IG systems became common place.
Mactra and Marpessa[/QUOTE]
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