Seagoing Fictional Books - Ships Nostalgia
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Seagoing Fictional Books

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  #1  
Old 7th September 2006, 18:44
K urgess K urgess is offline
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Seagoing Fictional Books

We've had the TV shows and we're currently trying to remember the most obscure seagoing films ever so let's try books.

I can't find another thread about fiction books but if there is one no doubt I'll be diverted.

"The Good Shepherd" by C. S. Forester.
"The Wireless Officer" by Percy F. Westerman (Well what did you expect? )

If this works we could try best shipping reference works in another thread.
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  #2  
Old 7th September 2006, 18:56
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Although I read voraciously all the Hornblower books as a youngster, the book which I found most exciting was "Moby Dick"-- so that's my choice.As I got older, I came to like the Conrad books, so I guess a close second is "Heart of Darkness"

Please sir (hand in the air), can we have songs next?
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  #3  
Old 7th September 2006, 19:00
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A modern Author is Brian Callison who I believe was 2nd Mate in Blue Flue, he wrote amongst others a 'Flock of Ships'
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  #4  
Old 7th September 2006, 20:16
pierhead jumper pierhead jumper is offline  
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Try" The Death Ship",by B.Traven.Not for the faint hearted.Pierhead Jumper.
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  #5  
Old 7th September 2006, 20:27
Jeff Egan Jeff Egan is offline
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Brass Bounders of the Rosemount, read it as a kid, my wife tracked a copy down a couple of years ago and gave it to me as a pressie, its a bit "famous five go to sea" but a good read for a child.
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  #6  
Old 7th September 2006, 20:32
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The best ever sea book in my mind is " HMS Ulysses " by Alistair McLEAN. I have read it and re read it many times, a super book.

Chris.
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  #7  
Old 7th September 2006, 20:45
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My favourite books when I was a teenager.

Percy F Westerman's books. Great writer. I still have, Cadet Alan Carr.
Sea scouts at Dunkirk.
Can't remember the other one.
In the loft somewhere.
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  #8  
Old 7th September 2006, 21:08
K urgess K urgess is offline
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John

Sorry, bossy sparkie again.

Of course you may have songs next young man. As long as it doesn't turn into a sing, sing or show your...... sort of do.

What about the Geoffrey Jenkins books like "Scend of the Sea" etc.

Being on VLCCs meant reading or drinking. So the first thing was to work your way through the library. Then drink some. Then work your way through the library. Then dri.....

Must admit that the Hammond Innes, Alistair Maclean, C.S.Forester ones are always at the top of the list.
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  #9  
Old 7th September 2006, 22:01
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Patrick O'Brians books about Royal Navy 1800 fact and fiction woven together in 20 books.
I see John Shaw likes Moby Dick. They made the film just outside Milford Haven, when they'd finished the rubber whale was abandoned and drifted out to sea, coast guard had to send a tug to get it back as it became a hazard to shipping.
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  #10  
Old 7th September 2006, 22:16
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Any of the Tristan Jones books, they were originally thought to be fact. Yachtie rather than big ships, but a good read.
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  #11  
Old 7th September 2006, 22:25
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Nicholas Monsarrat

The Three Corvettes, and The Cruel Sea.

Also, The Boat by Walter Gibson. A harrowing tale of survival.

Clem
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  #12  
Old 7th September 2006, 22:42
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Anything by Alexander Kent, particularly the "Bolitho" novels.

fred

" avast behind, ( Oooh sailor )
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  #13  
Old 7th September 2006, 23:34
benjidog benjidog is offline
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The last cruise of the Emden by Edwin P Hoyt is a great (true) tale of a WW1 German light cruiser with an amazing ending.

Morbid Dick also gets a vote and or course The Cruel Sea by Nicholas Montserrat - especially if you remember the film.

On a more fanciful theme there is of course The Rover by Joseph Conrad and dare I say Treasure Island is still one of my favourites. I love to dress up as Long John Silver and say "Arrrghhh Jim Lad" in West Country tones!

Brian
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  #14  
Old 7th September 2006, 23:39
Bruce Carson Bruce Carson is offline
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Para Handy, as always.

I'm cheating, but I would like to mention a non fiction title that I've enjoyed over and over again:
Richard Henry Dana's "Two Years Before The Mast".

Bruce C.
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  #15  
Old 8th September 2006, 02:35
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The Voyage

Try and get hold of a novel called 'The Voyage' by the late American actor Sterling Hayden. It's about the transition from sail to steam at the turn of the century. A real harrowing tale of the life of seamen on a iron hulled sailing vessel, bullying officers and the start of the unions in the States. One of those books that you can't put down.
Ray Jordan
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  #16  
Old 8th September 2006, 03:42
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  #17  
Old 8th September 2006, 05:00
Ian Harrod Ian Harrod is offline  
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Norie's Tables!
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  #18  
Old 8th September 2006, 10:07
Peter4447 Peter4447 is offline  
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Although a very tragic story Brian Callinson's The Thunder of Crude is an excellent read. Another that I have enjoyed is Ronald Johnston's Disaster at Dungeness. Both are concerned with tankers.
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Last edited by Peter4447; 8th September 2006 at 11:35..
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  #19  
Old 8th September 2006, 16:00
lakercapt lakercapt is offline  
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The tales of Para Handy By Neil Munro.
Get it out every few months and read another few short stories.
Never fails tomake me chuckle even tho I know all the stories!
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  #20  
Old 8th September 2006, 16:16
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Brian Callison,s Trapps War, read it countless times and will do many more times. Thought his sequel Trapps Peace was a let down.
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  #21  
Old 8th September 2006, 18:16
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Parahandy of course, for obvious realism, the Glencannon series (I still drink Duggan's Dew of Kirkintilloch) and in the non-fiction line, the Last Grain Race by Eric Newby.
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  #22  
Old 8th September 2006, 22:18
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My favourite is still on my bookshelf after being read several times since 1953, I think. "The Caine Mutiny"

Split
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  #23  
Old 9th September 2006, 00:27
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Two to me are outstanding: Patrick O'brien, any of his books are enthralling. I mourn his passing, because I've almost read them all. Then there was Percy F Westerman! He was the man who influenced me in my decision to go to sea!

One of his best was, "Coaster" - or at least I think that was the title; it was all about the life of a deck hand on a coaster on the china clay run etc.
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  #24  
Old 9th September 2006, 11:42
jock paul jock paul is offline  
 
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most of my favourites have already been mentioned, but I would include a novel titled "To the River's End", can't remember the author, but I read it in the 1950's. Abut an Australian lad who goes to sea in tramps and it follows his seagoing career. I believe it was very true to life.
Once, when I was in hospital after an op. the ship's agent lent me the Glencannon Omnibus. I had to stop reading it, I was laughing so much it was bursting my stitches! Very painful. Must try and pick up a copy of that book again.
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  #25  
Old 9th September 2006, 15:02
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jock paul
most of my favourites have already been mentioned, but I would include a novel titled "To the River's End", can't remember the author, but I read it in the 1950's. Abut an Australian lad who goes to sea in tramps and it follows his seagoing career. I believe it was very true to life.
Once, when I was in hospital after an op. the ship's agent lent me the Glencannon Omnibus. I had to stop reading it, I was laughing so much it was bursting my stitches! Very painful. Must try and pick up a copy of that book again.
This book, or the first few chapters is available online now at http://gaslight.mtroyal.ab.ca/glencX01.htm as it is out of copyright in Canada

Keith
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