Scanner. Which one ?? - Ships Nostalgia
12:42

Welcome
Welcome!Welcome to Ships Nostalgia, the world's greatest online community for people worldwide with an interest in ships and shipping. Whether you are crew, ex-crew, ship enthusiasts or cruisers, this is the forum for you. And what's more, it's completely FREE.

Click here to go to the forums home page and find out more.
Click here to join.
Log in
User Name Password

Scanner. Which one ??

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 22nd November 2008, 15:53
LizzieNo1 LizzieNo1 is offline  
member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 1
Scanner. Which one ??

Hi all,
I do hope someone can help me out here. I have narrowed it down to two types of scanner. The problem being I just do not understand the confusing terminology, DPI I do understand, that's why I needed another scanner, but interpolation, cathode or LED.
The comparison is here, mostly a mystery to me:
Compare Scanners
Hope the link works

Regards
Lizzie
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 22nd November 2008, 16:02
K urgess K urgess is offline
user
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
My location
Posts: 83
I've always used Epson and the whole of my gallery is scanned with them.
The cathode or LED refers to the sort of lighting it uses to illuminate the document as it scans. Cold cathode is like your flourescent tube in your overhead light, more or less (my scanners has this). LED is the semocinductor light just like the latest Christmas lights and I've got no experience of it. I assume it's as good as cold cathode or they wouldn't use it.
Interpolation means that the scanner optical resolution is increased by the scanner filling in the dots between where optical ends and the highest resolution. I never use it. 600 dpi is about all you need for normal scanning. If I scan at my maximum optical resolution of 4800dpi you can see the grain of the film. You only need the bigger calculated one if you want to print wall posters.
If you want to scan negatives or slides you need backlight and high resolution. That's the only time I use 4800dpi.
Cheers
Kris

Last edited by K urgess; 22nd November 2008 at 16:06.. Reason: missing Ss
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 22nd November 2008, 16:25
LizzieNo1 LizzieNo1 is offline  
member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 1
Hi Kris,
Thank you very much for your prompt reply. I must admit to being very impressed with your scanned photos.
My scanner at the moment is an all-in-one Epson, it scans at 600dpi. But, the quality is not close to what I want. I would like to scan some old but small B/W photos, repair them digitally, print & frame them. I would also like to scan a few negatives & slides of very old origins.
Once again, thank you Kris. The information you have given here is invaluable, and gives me greater understanding.

Regards
Paul
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 22nd November 2008, 18:02
benjidog benjidog is offline
member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
My location
Posts: 17
Kris has answered your questions but you may also like to take a look at these SN threads where scanners have been discussed in the past:

https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showth...093#post267093

https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?t=18581

https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?t=16634
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 23rd December 2008, 07:08
pier's Avatar
pier pier is offline  
william lisle
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 470
epson styus dx 4400 scanner printer is very good for scaning
__________________
peir lisle
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 23rd December 2008, 11:04
andysk's Avatar
andysk andysk is offline   SN Supporter
Super Moderator (L)
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Radio Officer
Active: 1970 - 1978
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 1,742
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marconi Sahib View Post
..... If you want to scan negatives or slides you need backlight and high resolution. That's the only time I use 4800dpi.
Cheers
Kris
Just to expand on Kris's comments, for negs and slides what you need is light projected through the neg/slide from the top. There are two methods of achieving this, either by reflecting the light from below the glass plate of the flatbed through mirrors, which is OK, but doesn't give top quality scans. The other method is to have a separate light source in the lid, this will give the best quality, though is more expensive than the single light source.

I have used an Epson 4990 for several years now, it's no longer produced as it has been replaced with the V700 (or perhaps V750)

Take a look at www.photo-i.co.uk for info, reviews and a forum. On there you will find many links to other sites going into the subject in much more depth.

Have fun ...

Cheers

Andy
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 29th December 2008, 13:29
LizzieNo1 LizzieNo1 is offline  
member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 1
Well gents, I ended up with a Canon 4400f. It scans negatives, slides the usual bumpf. So far the results are good.

Regards
Lizzie
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Epson Scanner TWAIN K urgess Cameras, Photography and Equipment 9 15th May 2008 13:51
Slide scanner, which one ? dinsdale Cameras, Photography and Equipment 24 14th March 2008 21:06
Bow Radar Scanner kepowee The Bridge 5 26th January 2007 03:47
Home made scanner for 35mm slides chrisp9au Cameras, Photography and Equipment 8 9th September 2006 02:04



Support SN


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.1.0 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.