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  #26  
Old 28th August 2016, 18:27
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John Rogers John Rogers is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quintero View Post
Hi! The turn a ship makes after something like that happens has a name. I do not remember.
Regards
180?.....
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  #27  
Old 28th August 2016, 18:35
Reef Knot Reef Knot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quintero View Post
Hi! The turn a ship makes after something like that happens has a name. I do not remember.
Regards
I've heard about the Anderson turn, the Williamson turn and the Scharnow turn.

C'mon! Someone please say "Well done!!" - I so want to be right!
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  #28  
Old 28th August 2016, 18:47
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You are correct Reef Knot "Well Done" I googled what you posted.

A man overboard rescue turn is a sailing maneuver usually implemented immediately upon learning of a man overboard. To maneuver closer to the person's location, implementations of the principles described are: the quick turn (also known as the Q-turn or the figure eight turn), the Anderson turn, the Williamson turn, and the Scharnow turn.

Last edited by John Rogers; 28th August 2016 at 18:49..
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  #29  
Old 28th August 2016, 18:48
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The visuals of this thread can keep a person up at night.
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  #30  
Old 28th August 2016, 19:09
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If I tied my aunt to the propeller before it started to revolve would she be my giddy aunt when it did?....... sorry but I appear to have lost my coat.

I recall back in my Harland and Bluff days some painters were working round the stern end of a tanker when the propeller suddenly started to revolve. Their wooden scow was rapidly reduced to matchwood and they were not happy bunnies after their unscheduled dip. The prop rotated very slowly so nobody was hurt.
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  #31  
Old 28th August 2016, 21:04
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It's interesting that when at sea the ship was your insulation from a totally hostile environment. A few centimetres of steel between you and a world that contained unforgiving physics, and all kinds of nasty things that even Hollywood 'alien' animators couldn't top.

Yet we cruised around the oceans of the world without really looking at it like that, because we had faith in the machines we lived in and looked after. It's only on threads like this you realise that horror was just a few seconds away, and on the occasion you did encounter it, albeit if only briefly, your training and job kicked in and took your mind off it.
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  #32  
Old 28th August 2016, 22:53
eddyw eddyw is offline  
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Williamson turn? I was a passenger on a liner once when this was carried out as an exercise (was that a BoT requirement of some sort?) Oil can with flag affixed chucked off stern and this reported to bridge. Turn caused substantial heel but seems to have been effective as sure enough can eventually came up dead ahead. Have to say took a worryingly long time to complete retrieval. Moral: keep both feet firmly on deck.
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  #33  
Old 28th August 2016, 23:02
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Originally Posted by ART6 View Post
Barnacles on the hull of a cruise ship? Never! I am told that the only barnacles inhabit the passenger's lounges!



If you elect to fall over the side from the balcony of a cruise ship the water will be like concrete, so the screws will be the least of your problems. Your guts will explode under the impact and the sharks will feast upon them while you are still barely alive and vainly attempting to swim. The gutless will admit defeat, drown, and be eaten while those with courage will fight clear of the sharks and consider that their loss at least saved the cost of an appendectomy.

In my time at sea I never considered the question of what I would do if I went overboard, since that would be difficult to do from the engine room and we never went on deck at sea -- we left that sort of thing to our navigator colleagues who were genetically programmed to be wet and cold for most of their trips. So I am not really qualified for this thread.
Do not tell me that E/R staff do not find danger .many years ago whilst in Drydock in calcutta at breakfast time the 2/e decided to take a walk on shore as he walked down the gangway someone called to him from the boatneck,he turned round tripped and fell over the side rails,sad to say he did not survive the fall.
It is a sight that i will never forget i went down to the bottom of the dock with a stretcher but the police would not let us remove the body till about 1600 that afternoon,they had no compassion,
jim
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  #34  
Old 29th August 2016, 02:13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quintero View Post
Hi! The turn a ship makes after something like that happens has a name. I do not remember.
Regards
Williamson Turn.
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  #35  
Old 29th August 2016, 04:25
McCloggie McCloggie is offline  
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We were taught that the first thing to do in a MOB-ex was to turn the ship to kick the stern and screws clear of the man in the water. Admittedly this was on a minesweeper and not a large merchant ship.

The turn Quintero mentions will be a Williamson Turn where you throw the ship so many degrees to port (or starboard) to turn and regain the reciprocal of your original course.

I believe these are still used. Certainly on the most recent Bridge Cards I have seen for FPSOs on passage the manoeuvre is till there.

McC
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  #36  
Old 29th August 2016, 06:08
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While we are on the subject of propellers, I recall that the screws of twin engined ships that I sailed on revolved inboard, ie the port prop turning clockwise and the starboard anticlockwise when viewed from the stern.
This brings to mind the Bathurst Class WW2 minesweepers built by Australia and gifted to the NZ Navy in the 1950's had twin screw triple expansion reciprocating steam engines that rotated the opposite way. I only went on trials once on the Kiama and at full speed a lot of lube spray etc from the exposed engines was flung into the middles making it rather damp.
Was this a design mistake or is it sometimes either/or rotation?
Just a thought

Bob
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  #37  
Old 29th August 2016, 06:35
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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Originally Posted by Samsette View Post
Williamson Turn.
They used to have instruction notices about that on the bridges of most ships. I always thought it meant some scrubber on a Norwegian ship and then I realised that that is a Wilhelmsen Turn.

John T
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  #38  
Old 29th August 2016, 08:09
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quintero View Post
Hi! The turn a ship makes after something like that happens has a name. I do not remember.
Regards
Try this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Man_overboard_rescue_turn

I have a faint recollection that in the UK MN it's referred to as the "Heidlemann Turn" or something like that.
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  #39  
Old 29th August 2016, 08:11
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Whoops! This is what you get for responding to something without reading the rest of the thread! Sorry folks!
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  #40  
Old 29th August 2016, 08:30
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I have put a question on Cruise ships regarding Mob procedures when the chance arises.

It seems that it depends on how soon reported;
If some minutes have passed then a Williamson turn would be executed and prepare to launch FRB.
If the report is contemporaneous, or seen from the bridge, then a 'crash stop' would be executed with immediate launch of the FRB.

I gather that it also depends on Company Standing Orders and, of course, sea conditions.
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  #41  
Old 29th August 2016, 08:38
Dartskipper Dartskipper is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spongebob View Post
While we are on the subject of propellers, I recall that the screws of twin engined ships that I sailed on revolved inboard, ie the port prop turning clockwise and the starboard anticlockwise when viewed from the stern.
This brings to mind the Bathurst Class WW2 minesweepers built by Australia and gifted to the NZ Navy in the 1950's had twin screw triple expansion reciprocating steam engines that rotated the opposite way. I only went on trials once on the Kiama and at full speed a lot of lube spray etc from the exposed engines was flung into the middles making it rather damp.
Was this a design mistake or is it sometimes either/or rotation?
Just a thought

Bob
Hi Bob,

In answer to your query, twin screws can be in either rotation. The effect on ship handling though is different in each case. This also applies to smaller craft that I am more familiar with.

With inward turning propellers, if one engine is shut down, the vessel will still be easy to keep on course with minimal helm correction needed.
With outward turning propellers, if one engine is shut down, the vessel has a strong tendency to veer in the direction of the stopped engine (i.e if the port engine is stopped, the vessel will naturally try to turn to port.) This means you have to sometimes put on a lot of opposite helm just to keep the vessel on a straight course. The benefits of this though are that if a vessel has outward turning screws, she is much easier to handle in harbour and restricted waters, especially so if she has twin rudders too. This was the set up in the Fairmile launches that I enjoyed handling. By setting one engine ahead, and the other astern, you could turn in the length of the vessel, without making headway or sternway.
Single screw vessels have different characteristics, my launch Our Rosalie was built for inshore trawling, and she would turn to port quite rapidly, but turning to starboard was slower, and needed some bursts of astern if turning in a tight spot, just to kick the stern around.

Cheers,

Roy.
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  #42  
Old 29th August 2016, 09:21
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If I remember correctly, the Williamson turn was always performed at full speed, on a right handed vessel the helm was put hard to port until 60 degrees off course, then hard to starboard until back on a reciprocal course to the original heading, I could be wrong with the right or left handed screw, it was all more than 50 years ago, but the rest I believe to be correct. Bruce.
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  #43  
Old 29th August 2016, 09:43
jimg0nxx jimg0nxx is offline  
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Is it a Williamson Turn?
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  #44  
Old 30th August 2016, 00:50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quintero View Post
Hi! The turn a ship makes after something like that happens has a name. I do not remember.
Regards
Hi, quintero, your question answered here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Man_overboard_rescue_turn

Some interesting reading!

Taff
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  #45  
Old 30th August 2016, 00:53
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Sorry - should have read the rest of the thread too!!!

Taff
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  #46  
Old 30th August 2016, 07:52
Phil Rogers Phil Rogers is offline  
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Williamson Turn
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