Navigating Cadets in the Engine Room - Page 2 - Ships Nostalgia
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Navigating Cadets in the Engine Room

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  #26  
Old 14th November 2018, 18:43
George Bis George Bis is offline
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Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Navigation
Active: 1967 - 1979
 
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I did a week " down below" on the Naess Sovereign, a 90000 tonne steam tanker.
It was interesting, if rather warm.I can remember soot blowing the boiler tubes and helping the Junior taking the log in the enormous engine room.
The biggest change I noticed was how enclosed it was, compared to being on deck. I remember looking up at the engine room skylight, light by day, dark by night was the only difference between the two watches.
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  #27  
Old 17th November 2018, 17:56
Pilot24 Pilot24 is offline
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Did two stints in the Engine Room, once on the Dartbank and the second on the Sprucebank, and yes, it was in my Record Book.
4-8 on the Dartbank and 12-4 on the Sprucebank.
3rd Eng was "servicing" a generator on the Sprucebank which I found interesting and informative as I'm one of those blokes whose wife keeps the drill hidden from me!
Mind you, Bank Line taught me how to use a paint brush.
I learned a hard lesson on the Dartbank not to get pissed on New Years Eve and then do the 4-8 in the engine room the next morning!
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  #28  
Old 17th November 2018, 21:05
Taylormoran Taylormoran is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by derekhore View Post
The Navigating Cadet's Record Book doesn't actually mention anything at all about engine room time.
Have a look in Section 1: General Seamanship.

I got mine signed off whilst on the British Destiny.
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  #29  
Old 19th November 2018, 08:08
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derekhore derekhore is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Taylormoran View Post
Have a look in Section 1: General Seamanship.
Thanks - will go back into the attic and try to find the front couple of pages - the sellotape repairs have somewhat given up!
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  #30  
Old 10th December 2018, 02:36
Uricanejack Uricanejack is offline  
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I think it’s all been said already. A signature required.

I did a bit of time in the Engine Room of all the ships I sailed on as a Cadet. On my first ship the Avon. I spent three days working with the Lecky in the ER. Why I don’t know it wasn’t a required signature. Somebody more important than me thought it was a good idea.
I quite enjoyed it.
From time to time I visited the ER. Usually having been sent on a mission by someone to get something.

I remember having to get signature for having taken part in ER standby. Entering and leaving port. I spent a week or so with the doom watch on the Centaur doing several standbys. Entering and leaving port.
In addition to going through the entire startup routine with the Junior. Once underway, I was assigned the task of keeping the engine temp right.
Came in handy. I have won quite a few beers, betting an engineer, I know how to start the engine.
For some reason I never got the week in the ER signed.
So I, ended up having to do it again on the Resource.
I spent a few days each with the 3rd, the 4th and the Juniors.

The main part of which I remember. The 3rd was a bit of a dick. I spent both days cleaning the heavy oil purifiers. Which was part of his routine. The plates all had several inches of hard crud between them even leaving them in solvent made little effect. I hated that particular job. Mind you I know how a f’ing purifier works, and was able to draw one quite easily for my engineering knowledge exam.

I quite enjoyed it. The knowledge I picked up came in handy, long since left BP behind me. Live far away in a different world.
Having been on the controls in the ECR on engine room control and having had to keep a check on the pressure in the air cylinders.

Helps you understand why stopping and starting is a big deal.

Last edited by Uricanejack; 10th December 2018 at 02:41..
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  #31  
Old 10th December 2018, 07:14
Engine Serang Engine Serang is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uricanejack View Post
I think itís all been said already. A signature required.

I did a bit of time in the Engine Room of all the ships I sailed on as a Cadet. On my first ship the Avon. I spent three days working with the Lecky in the ER. Why I donít know it wasnít a required signature. Somebody more important than me thought it was a good idea.
I quite enjoyed it.
From time to time I visited the ER. Usually having been sent on a mission by someone to get something.

I remember having to get signature for having taken part in ER standby. Entering and leaving port. I spent a week or so with the doom watch on the Centaur doing several standbys. Entering and leaving port.
In addition to going through the entire startup routine with the Junior. Once underway, I was assigned the task of keeping the engine temp right.
Came in handy. I have won quite a few beers, betting an engineer, I know how to start the engine.
For some reason I never got the week in the ER signed.
So I, ended up having to do it again on the Resource.
I spent a few days each with the 3rd, the 4th and the Juniors.

The main part of which I remember. The 3rd was a bit of a dick. I spent both days cleaning the heavy oil purifiers. Which was part of his routine. The plates all had several inches of hard crud between them even leaving them in solvent made little effect. I hated that particular job. Mind you I know how a fíing purifier works, and was able to draw one quite easily for my engineering knowledge exam.

I quite enjoyed it. The knowledge I picked up came in handy, long since left BP behind me. Live far away in a different world.
Having been on the controls in the ECR on engine room control and having had to keep a check on the pressure in the air cylinders.

Helps you understand why stopping and starting is a big deal.
Jack, when I was a 4th Engineer I hated opening up the heavy Oil purifiers for cleaning, a sh1tty job. If I had a Deck Cadet on watch you can bet your bottom dollar he would be helping me. Character building.
In fact it wasn't character building, cleaning out the sewage treatment plant was, and it drew you closer to your fellow shipmates.
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  #32  
Old 10th December 2018, 20:03
holland25 holland25 is offline  
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After reading some of the above and the tasks involved, particularly the last one,I am glad I was a Sparky.I doffs my lid to the Engineers.
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  #33  
Old 26th December 2018, 20:32
Mexico1971 Mexico1971 is offline
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Well going through eng ranks starting as a cadet I never manually cleaned the plates etc of a purifier it was always the ‘crews job’.
So maybe it was the engineer being slightly vindictive 🤷‍♂️
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  #34  
Old 26th December 2018, 22:05
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GeorgeM13 GeorgeM13 is offline  
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The Mates I sailed with as a cadet always managed to find enough cr** jobs within the deck department without going down the engine room to find more. The happy days of cement washing fresh water tanks and applying epoxy to places that never needed it or never saw the light of day.
Good times
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  #35  
Old 26th December 2018, 23:59
dannic dannic is offline  
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Sailed with a few who had started as deck cadets but transferred to engine, never any who went the other direction! My time on deck as engineer cadet was putting up pilot flag, and got that wrong!!
Dannic.
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  #36  
Old 30th December 2018, 18:35
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Burntisland Ship Yard Burntisland Ship Yard is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Taylormoran View Post
Have a look in Section 1: General Seamanship.

I got mine signed off whilst on the British Destiny.
My engineer cadet training book (which I still have) is signed off by the mates I did bridge watch time on the Norway and Westminster...
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  #37  
Old 31st December 2018, 17:27
George Bis George Bis is offline
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I only ever sailed with two engineering Cadets (with Denholms) I did however twice sail with engineering degree graduates who were sent to sea a Junior Engineers for practical experience.
The first was excellent plus being a really pleasant lad.
The second could be said to have an " attitude problem" and whenever he felt that he wasn't appreciated down below would decide that life on the bridge was more worthy of his talents!
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  #38  
Old 7th February 2019, 09:59
Old Janner Old Janner is offline  
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Hi Graham,
I am using this as a contact and a request.
Spencer Lewis, BP catering, asst Steward, 2nd Cook, Chief Cook, and Catering Officer, late 60's early 70's.
I am writing the memoirs of my time (18 month's on the British Hazel) Do you have any crew lists from 1965 "January until 2nd June 1966, I left in Smiths Dock. I am looking for some names of the Carpenters, Donkeymen and Pumpman, who were good friends and Crib partners.
Thanks in advance. Spence.
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  #39  
Old 13th February 2019, 17:50
Graham Wallace Graham Wallace is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Janner View Post
Hi Graham,
I am using this as a contact and a request.
Spencer Lewis, BP catering, asst Steward, 2nd Cook, Chief Cook, and Catering Officer, late 60's early 70's.
I am writing the memoirs of my time (18 month's on the British Hazel) Do you have any crew lists from 1965 "January until 2nd June 1966, I left in Smiths Dock. I am looking for some names of the Carpenters, Donkeymen and Pumpman, who were good friends and Crib partners.
Thanks in advance. Spence.
Hi Spencer,
Quite a while since we have been in touch.

I only have one crew list for Hazel leaving Drydock May to mid June 1965. You as 2/Cook, ERS (Pumpman?) J Burns and Donkeyman WJ Lincoln, no other crew members listed. Master was TRI Tanner.

I have no crew lists between Aug/Oct 1965 to Aug 1969, I have the feeling none were issued.

Graham
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  #40  
Old 14th February 2019, 10:22
Old Janner Old Janner is offline  
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British Hazel

[QUOTE=Graham Wallace;2968667]Hi Spencer,
Quite a while since we have been in touch.

Hi Graham,
Thank you for your reply, nice to hear from you again I trust all is well in your household.
The two names you gave were very useful I can add to my small book.
I was surprised to hear that stopped posting crew lists for the fleet for a period of three years, just my luck! Billy Lincoln was a Character from the Old school.
Best regards,

Spence.
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