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Cruelty personified!

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  #1  
Old 20th October 2015, 17:24
Philthechill Philthechill is offline  
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Thumbs down Cruelty personified!

I was on 'Makrana' and we picked-up a load of cattle, (from, possibly, Port Sudan but I'm not quite certain on that), which were destined for Suez and were fed-and-watered by a couple of local yokels we took with them.

On arrival we anchored and lighters were brought-out to load the cattle onto.

The poor beasts were either hoisted-up in cargo-nets or had a rope noose put over their horns to lift them into the lighter. The, quite large, beasts were taking their full weight on their horns! The agonised bellowing was deafening.

When the beast in the cargo net had been 'persuaded' to stand on the net the bloke driving the winch wacked the steam-valve full open causing the net to ascend very rapidly. This resulted in the beast losing its balance. Its legs could be bent double or sticking through the mesh. I distinctly remember hearing the 'crack' as a leg was broken, followed by more agonised bellowing from the injured beast.

I watched this carnage for about ten minutes then went back to my cabin!

It was a 'one-and-only' deck-cargo I ever saw, thank Heaven. Phil
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  #2  
Old 20th October 2015, 17:55
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Satanic Mechanic Satanic Mechanic is offline  
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Despite my support of human rights and such like or possibly because of it, I really am something of a misanthrope and few thing upset me more than cruelty to animals, I find it genuinely upsetting and few thing represent how unpleasant our species is than our disrespect for other living things. Given how we can't even be nice to each other , the poor creatures of this world have little chance
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  #3  
Old 20th October 2015, 18:17
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Originally Posted by Satanic Mechanic View Post
Despite my support of human rights and such like or possibly because of it, I really am something of a misanthrope and few thing upset me more than cruelty to animals, I find it genuinely upsetting and few thing represent how unpleasant our species is than our disrespect for other living things. Given how we can't even be nice to each other , the poor creatures of this world have little chance
We, as a species, are very cruel. -I read, once, the story of the canning factories in Chicago. The hero of the story, in the end, got to Washington and a President, Roosevelt, I think. pushed through legislation.

They used to have men with hammers, standing on the otherside of the fencing to the slaughterhouse. Any poor animal that got its foot caught promptly had it broken and pushed back in. They were, probably, on a moving belt.

You can imagine what the unsuspecting consumer had in his corned beef!

Last edited by Split; 20th October 2015 at 18:21..
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Old 20th October 2015, 20:30
Dartskipper Dartskipper is offline  
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The chief engineer at the Lloyd Maunder abattoir in Tiverton refused to go into the factory to attend a breakdown if there was any slaughtering in process. He would always send one of his team, and then only go himself at the end of the shift, or if the carcasses had been cleared away.
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Old 20th October 2015, 23:17
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Perhaps I was lucky - or the cattle were - both times we carried three hundred head of cattle from Djibouti to Suez - probably Malakand both times - I watched more out of curiosity than duty, but whilst I recall the long legs of the straggly beasts sticking out of the cargo nets I don't recall seeing any broken limbs; and at no time was the head harness used. Perhaps we had a different set of winch drivers .................... and rather more aged winches (though they clattered away enthusiastically enough discharging in Calcutta and were subject to a lot of TLC on the return passage across the Indian Ocean from Colombo to Djibouti courtesy Roy (Okey Dokey) Dokes, Ponch Sahib). Yep, guess I was lucky because I can be somewhat squeamish despite having a GP doctor as a father.
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  #6  
Old 20th October 2015, 23:21
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This link relates to a story of cruel behaviour by some of the deck crew to cattle on deck on a Blue Funnel ship in the 1960s.

https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/galler...omedon/cat/510
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  #7  
Old 20th October 2015, 23:36
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We were supposed to pick up cattle at Djibouti, they had not fared well, we got half-cured hides, and they stank.
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  #8  
Old 21st October 2015, 09:32
Philthechill Philthechill is offline  
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Exclamation When I came ashore----

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dartskipper View Post
The chief engineer at the Lloyd Maunder abattoir in Tiverton refused to go into the factory to attend a breakdown if there was any slaughtering in process. He would always send one of his team, and then only go himself at the end of the shift, or if the carcasses had been cleared away.
----I worked for an Industrial Refrigeration outfit called UDEC.

One place I used to visit, to look-after their NH3 plant, was Malton Bacon Factory.

On one of my first visits the 2nd. Engineer (Charlie Corner), asked me if I'd like to 'have a look round'.

I accepted but said I didn't want to see the animals being slaughtered.

I was duly shown-round the whole place. From the carcases being scalded, (to remove unwanted bristles), to bacon-slices being packed!

It's truly amazing how little of a pig is left after being 'processed'.

There was a square hole, high-up, in a wall with the end of a conveyor-belt sticking out. Beneath would be an open-sided artic trailer. From the belt a constant stream of, stripped-bare, pig skulls poured-out.

Those 'naked' skulls, (even THEY had been scraped bare), were all that was left of a 'baconer'!

Everything else was used in one form-or-another. Phil
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  #9  
Old 21st October 2015, 09:43
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But try to buy British bacon in the town, it isn't easy.
Hopefully, modern abbatoirs have removed cruelty from the process.
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  #10  
Old 21st October 2015, 10:02
Scelerat Scelerat is offline  
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But try to buy British bacon in the town, it isn't easy.
Hopefully, modern abbatoirs have removed cruelty from the process.
Theoretically, they have, but there are still evil ba$tards working in them as news reports frequently show. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-31108761 Usually, abuse of animals is very closely correlated to abuse of people. The kind of person who enjoys making helpless animals suffer also enjoys making helpless people suffer.
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  #11  
Old 21st October 2015, 10:45
Don A.Macleod Don A.Macleod is offline  
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Like Hugh we also carried 300 from Djibouti to Suez on the Matra. As I remember we didn't have any "herdsmen" with them. They were "berthed" fore and aft which had the deck accesses(stairs) removed from accomodation and poop so that they could not injure themselves. Their feed was stacked on no.5 hatch but was soon exhuasted even though it had been fenced off a bit, our own crew were to scatter some of this straw throughout the passage but the beasts soon got at it. In any case a lot of our guys were scared of them and I used to help feed them (I'd been brought up with them) along with a couple of QMs. our workshop was in the aft masthouse so had to go between them. Don't recollect losing any of them through injury or otherwise,really a placid mob, of course we had electric winches which were quite and comforting unlike those steam clatterers !! Don
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  #12  
Old 21st October 2015, 18:36
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But try to buy British bacon in the town, it isn't easy.
Hopefully, modern abbatoirs have removed cruelty from the process.

Not while we allow Halal and Kosher.
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  #13  
Old 21st October 2015, 20:41
Dartskipper Dartskipper is offline  
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Post #8.

Another customer I dealt with was the North Devon Meat Co. in Okehampton. They slaughtered cattle and sheep. The chief maintenance engineer told me a few stories, most of which I wouldn't want to repeat. (Some involved male and female members of staff in the canteen on the night shift, but we won't go there!)
One of my visits was to demonstrate a sanitising chemical for cleaning down at the end of the shift.
Moving right along, regarding the total use of the animal after slaughter, I was surprised to find out that pork pies are filled with gelatine derived from cattle, not pigs. It caused us a few difficulties when CJD, or Mad Cow Disease was rampant.
I still enjoy fresh meat and meat products, but I won't touch some processed meat products.

Roy.
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  #14  
Old 22nd October 2015, 00:22
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I'd concur re abhorrence of gratuitous cruelty to animals.
In HK I've seen the gall bladders removed from live snakes and live fish being filleted.

I have little but contempt for the anti-fur lobby who have driven breeding out of the UK where it can be regulated to the Far East where sickening cruelty is practised.
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  #15  
Old 22nd October 2015, 06:58
DURANGO DURANGO is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pat Kennedy View Post
This link relates to a story of cruel behaviour by some of the deck crew to cattle on deck on a Blue Funnel ship in the 1960s.

https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/galler...omedon/cat/510
Disgusting I hope they where also never allowed to go back to sea
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  #16  
Old 22nd October 2015, 08:04
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Originally Posted by Scelerat View Post
Usually, abuse of animals is very closely correlated to abuse of people. The kind of person who enjoys making helpless animals suffer also enjoys making helpless people suffer.
Quite correct Scelerat!

There is a very old saying/quote that goes something like - You can judge a Country by the way they treat their animals.
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  #17  
Old 22nd October 2015, 15:25
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Unfortunately the strop or snotter round the horns was the accepted norm in the 50's and 60's. With good winchmen or crane men it was safe. Frightening and messy yes but they recovered very quickly. We always used this method even putting cattle into surf boats and I never saw an animal hurt. These animals were going for breeding purposes not for slaughter.
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  #18  
Old 22nd October 2015, 18:53
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I'd concur re abhorrence of gratuitous cruelty to animals.
In HK I've seen the gall bladders removed from live snakes and live fish being filleted.

I have little but contempt for the anti-fur lobby who have driven breeding out of the UK where it can be regulated to the Far East where sickening cruelty is practised.
Well, you know, they do stick live lobsters in boiling water.

In Canada, they used to, if they don't do it today, cull white seals for the fur. Animal rights folk went around spraying seals with red paint to save them.
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  #19  
Old 22nd October 2015, 19:02
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Live lobsters in boil water is best way to ruin a lobster. The shock of the heat makes the meat tough. Out them in into cold water and then put the fire under. As it gets hotter they go to sleep and die. Well, that is the theory. They taste better and a bit more tender.

Very Off Topic!
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  #20  
Old 23rd October 2015, 00:47
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In Canada, they used to, if they don't do it today, cull white seals for the fur.
That wouldn't bother me. I don't see it as cruelty.
I've been rendered unconscious by a blow to the head on a couple of occasions and would consider it not a bad way to go.
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  #21  
Old 23rd October 2015, 02:55
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That wouldn't bother me. I don't see it as cruelty.
I've been rendered unconscious by a blow to the head on a couple of occasions and would consider it not a bad way to go.
Basil, would you care to elaborate on your misfortunes ?
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  #22  
Old 23rd October 2015, 03:32
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KB,
Fell off bike - head hit road - Early bye-byes.
Brawl - Guy hit me on chin - Back of head connected with downpipe behind me - Early bye-byes.
Knocked down by bike at night on steep lane - head bounced off road - Early bye-byes.

Also been rendered unconscious by relaxing under 'g' and by hypobaric hypoxia - even better - no pain on regaining consciousness.
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  #23  
Old 23rd October 2015, 05:53
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have kook at this mess
https://gcaptain.com/cattle-scramble...5#.Vih0yNaQfA5
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  #24  
Old 26th October 2015, 16:36
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Originally Posted by Philthechill View Post
----I worked for an Industrial Refrigeration outfit called UDEC.

One place I used to visit, to look-after their NH3 plant, was Malton Bacon Factory.

On one of my first visits the 2nd. Engineer (Charlie Corner), asked me if I'd like to 'have a look round'.

I accepted but said I didn't want to see the animals being slaughtered.

I was duly shown-round the whole place. From the carcases being scalded, (to remove unwanted bristles), to bacon-slices being packed!

It's truly amazing how little of a pig is left after being 'processed'.

There was a square hole, high-up, in a wall with the end of a conveyor-belt sticking out. Beneath would be an open-sided artic trailer. From the belt a constant stream of, stripped-bare, pig skulls poured-out.

Those 'naked' skulls, (even THEY had been scraped bare), were all that was left of a 'baconer'!

Everything else was used in one form-or-another. Phil
Bringing back memories here Phil...worked in many meat plants( installing conveyor systems ) Malton was the worst of the lot, they thought they were something special some guy called max hilliard ran it before it got taken over. North Devon Meats was great good times in local hotel ...
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Old 26th October 2015, 18:23
Philthechill Philthechill is offline  
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Exclamation I remeber Max Hilliard-----

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Originally Posted by john g View Post
Bringing back memories here Phil...worked in many meat plants( installing conveyor systems ) Malton was the worst of the lot, they thought they were something special some guy called max hilliard ran it before it got taken over. North Devon Meats was great good times in local hotel ...
-----very well!

The CE was a bloke called 'Peter' (York I think), a really nice bloke.

Charlie Corner, was promoted to CE when 'Peter' went to another factory, (name escapes me just now).

Charlie was a very successful 'bike racer being British Champion in the 250cc Class on a Yamaha.

He had a go on the IOM, (Isle Of Man), but told me it was incredibly dangerous and 'once was enough' and "I've been there done that but never again!"

He left 'Malton Bacon' and set-up his own firm using laser-cutting machinery for cutting-out all kinds of intricate 'pieces'. A great bloke! Phil

Last edited by Philthechill; 26th October 2015 at 18:25..
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