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  #1  
Old 19th July 2020, 10:45
Tim Gibbs's Avatar
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Noises

We've had odours, now I have some noises. Some evocative, some scary;
The rasping sound from Doxford scraper drains
A 65bar/520deg steam leak
Turbocharger overspeeding as a result of an exhaust belt fire
An Aspinall governor operating
Doxford relief valve repeatedly lifting after a fuel valve stuck open
A Sulzer semi-rotary exhaust valve seizing
Double ring full Astern rung on the telegraph when on passage
Testing the overspeed trips on a 12,000 rpm turbo-generator
Top platform clatter from twin 6 LB Doxfords
The subsiding machinery noises punctuated by the alarms immediately after a black-out
Boiler room fire alarm that wasn’t a test or a fault
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  #2  
Old 19th July 2020, 12:39
henry1 henry1 is offline
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I was C/E on a 27 year old VLCC, entered the E/R for a walk round during discharge and could hear heavy vibration. Ran down to the cargo pumps and No.3 was vibrating so hard nuts were unscrewing, the 3/E was just standing looking at it, pushed him out of the way and tripped it, asked him why he had not tripped it and he said the C/O wouldn't like it.
Opened it up and the turbine had lost a blade.
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  #3  
Old 19th July 2020, 18:07
Steve Hodges Steve Hodges is offline  
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Can I add to Tim's list

All six relief valves on an LB Doxford firing like a royal salute, because the new 2/E reckoned he knew how to manoeuvre it.....
15psi steam and water blasting out of a deaerator gauge glass, because you've just shattered it by stupidly trying to tighten the gland without isolating....

I' m sure more will come back if I give it a while!.
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  #4  
Old 19th July 2020, 22:46
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Never had the pleasure of hearing 6 Steve!
Have one to add, a little more subtle;
A slightly bent Stal Laval AP 32 HP rotor
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  #5  
Old 19th July 2020, 23:02
dannic dannic is offline  
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Maiden voyage, B&W electronic main engine turbochargers "barking" or surging due to faults in fuel injection/exhaust valve set up. Polish electrician was convinced he was going to die!
Dannic
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  #6  
Old 19th July 2020, 23:16
oilkinger oilkinger is offline  
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We had a superheat 1275 PSI boiler tube burst on a destroyer I was on. The initial explosion was deafening followed by the ear shattering scream of steam roaring through the uptakes. The escaping steam jet sand blasted the furnace firebricks into 10mm fragments which shot up the funnel and rained down on the decks.
It took days for my ears to come good.
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  #7  
Old 20th July 2020, 00:47
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spongebob spongebob is offline
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What about a slack cable clanging on a Sampson post as the ship rolls and you try to sleep.

Bob
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  #8  
Old 20th July 2020, 08:12
david freeman david freeman is offline  
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how about dryfiring two foster wheeler HP 800psi 1000 degree superheat boilers together, as the c/e marches up and down the stoke hold demanding more steam ''Hiss'' comes to mind, as the contents of the boilers flood each furnace and escapes via the furnace fronts into the stokehold? The c/e at least had his wish???.

Last edited by david freeman; 20th July 2020 at 08:15.. Reason: edit spelling
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  #9  
Old 20th July 2020, 10:42
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Varley Varley is offline   SN Supporter
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I was going to post that I didn't think a water tube boiler would fail quite so calamitously but I see Foster Wheeler are in the firetube market. But 60 Bar? 600C?

One C/E on Stonehaven, who suffered with chronic condenseritis, was won't to kill the roof fired main boiler so that he could listen for any escaping steam internally without warning the watchkeeper but expecting him to put the fires back in very promptly. He should be named. Not for posterity but for thermal shocking.
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  #10  
Old 20th July 2020, 12:20
johnBP1 johnBP1 is offline
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Main sea water inlet sheared, the water got to the plates before under control.
Someone threw ball bearings in the air trunking in the engineers accomodation.
Sharps purifier bearing seized, what a noise, what a smell, red hot at one point..
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  #11  
Old 20th July 2020, 13:17
Ian860B Ian860B is offline  
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Second Engineer in a hurry as usual having a main condenser boxed up after tube plugging, started opening up the main circulating pump valves while around the other side two guys had the manhole doors in position but only a couple of nuts on two of the studs, as the air pressure built up the rubber joints on the manhole doors started vibrating like a giant reed producing an incredibly loud moaning sound then the water arrived an blew the doors open and the sea into the engine room at full bore, in the half minute or so it took to re-close the circ valves the water level was up to the floor plates!
IanB
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  #12  
Old 20th July 2020, 15:34
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The absence of sound - Just finished 00-04 watch, about to shower and the lights went off then the main engine cut out. Very eery, no noise or vibration. Quickly, back on with the boiler suit and boots and down the stairwell, by torchlight, to the control room. 2/E trying to get power back on without success. I was told to go and take a look-see at No.5 genny.

Opening the fire door, I could hear coursing water and something moving on the plates with the ship's rolling. My torch beam showed a gaping hole in the side of the Yanmar entablature, and then a piston slowly rolling on the plates!

I immediately went back to the CR to report the piston excursion. The 2/E couldn't get another genny on the board but we had some feeble light by now from the emergency genny.

Long story short: No.5 was the emergency genny and the system was trying to put it back on the board. Each time, the cooling water valve opened and the main engine CW header had drained. We pumped up the header, sealed the automatic CW valve to No.5 and, with lengths of welding cables, we crossed over to another genny, having made the system think it was starting No.5. It took us about 1.5 hours to get the main engine running and electrical power restored. By that time, being powerless in the middle of the Pacific, the ship was rolling quite alarmingly.

It was only later that I realized just how serious the situation was.

Rgds.
Dave
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  #13  
Old 21st July 2020, 20:38
Steve Hodges Steve Hodges is offline  
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[QUOTE=Tim Gibbs;3064485]Never had the pleasure of hearing 6 Steve! [/QUOTE)

Might not have been a full house, I didn't count ! First time I had heard one blow at all, didnt know what it was.I was off watch up on the boat deck watching us come out of Grangemouth locks, started running for the E/R at the first. 2E had run the fuel pressure up so high it strained all the pipe couplings, on MY fuel system, I couldn't get them to stop weeping after that. Not impressed.
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  #14  
Old 22nd July 2020, 02:29
Tony Foot Tony Foot is offline
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Wake up noises

Just on 12-4 watch about 00-08, no coffee yet.
Double ring Full Astern.. Fuel lever to Stop, fastest opening of starting air bottle ever. M/E still turning ahead, use starting air to brake M/E, lift all nine safety valves. engine now stopped Reverse M/E and in the excitement overdo starting air, nine safety valves lift again. Me now fully awake along with the rest of the ship. We missed the bastard though.
Another occasion on a stand-by boat moored near an oilrig. Lying in bed, a steady TIC,TIC,TIC from somewhere.Three days of pulling the cabin, drawers, cupboards etc. apart finally track it down to the ball in a paint marker pen on the desk moving with the ship's roll. Tiny but damn annoying on a quiet ship.
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  #15  
Old 22nd July 2020, 13:31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Foot View Post
Just on 12-4 watch about 00-08, no coffee yet.
Double ring Full Astern.. Fuel lever to Stop, fastest opening of starting air bottle ever. M/E still turning ahead, use starting air to brake M/E, lift all nine safety valves. engine now stopped Reverse M/E and in the excitement overdo starting air, nine safety valves lift again. Me now fully awake along with the rest of the ship. We missed the bastard though.
Another occasion on a stand-by boat moored near an oilrig. Lying in bed, a steady TIC,TIC,TIC from somewhere.Three days of pulling the cabin, drawers, cupboards etc. apart finally track it down to the ball in a paint marker pen on the desk moving with the ship's roll. Tiny but damn annoying on a quiet ship.
Mine was on twin 67LB6 Doxfords. It was about about 04.30 having got F.Away at 04.00 but the air bottles were still open 'cos there a trauma going on being sorted by the other watch-keepers whilst I had worked the engines up to full speed. Both controls to stop then 4 big blasts of air got the starboard engine stopped and then running astern. Got to about 50 rpm with 10 astern and 7000psi when J3/E arrived and got the port engine running astern, announcing that "That was easy". He didn't seem to notice that I had done the heavy lifting . This was somehow achieved without one relief valve lifting but apparently there were two columns of black stuff rolling rolling down the side of the funnel and spreading across the boat deck
I don't ever recall having a relief valve lift on a 67 bore enginebut it seemed to be soooo easy on the 75s
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  #16  
Old 22nd July 2020, 15:57
NINJA NINJA is offline  
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Water hammer!
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  #17  
Old 22nd July 2020, 20:24
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I encountered water hammer quite often when I was a council plumber. It could be a sort of quiet humming noise or more rarely as loud as a boiler shop in full production, scaring the life out of the whole street. One in particular I remember was in a tower block in Birkenhead and was so loud that the police and fire brigade were in attendance when I got there. It sounded like a Wurlitzer on steroids.
It was generally caused by a ball valve in a cistern juddering as the cistern refilled, and cured by renewing the washer and securing loose pipework
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  #18  
Old 23rd July 2020, 10:34
R.kearsley R.kearsley is offline  
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MV Port Adelaide, about 3 days out from Bluff to uk, Dec 1966, just come off watch and having lunch when almighty bang and ship started to jump, all engineers headed for E/R, extra 3rd had stopped the Doxford by the time we got to the bottom plates so no banging or ship acting like a dolphin, all walked around E?R and found nothing hanging loose, so senior 2nd gave the engine a kick and almighty bang again, stopped and all doors opened and found the con rod on one of the air pumps had parted but managed to push the piston up but it stuck at TDC until the weight of it made it drop and hit the rod on its way up, what a mess, managed to pull piston up and secured and removed damaged parts in C/case, no spare con rod on board as it had been used by another Port line vessel. started engine and very slowly increased revs and thought head office would tell us to head back to nz, but no such luck just told to head for Panama where we could meet and get a rod from another ship on its way to NZ, again no such luck so went on our merry way with just the one air pump and a few scavage fires, my first and only time with Doxford's
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  #19  
Old 23rd July 2020, 10:39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by R.kearsley View Post
MV Port Adelaide ...... my first and only time with Doxford's
A sheltered life
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  #20  
Old 23rd July 2020, 11:19
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As an aside to #15 , I wonder if the NEMSTOP system would have made much difference? Did anyone have any experience with it? I used to think it was a bit of a solution to a problem that didn't exist as reversing the engine quickly wouldn't necessarily be the quickest way to stop the ship if the cavitation was so great the prop couldn't get a good grip of the water
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Last edited by Tim Gibbs; 23rd July 2020 at 11:25.. Reason: Typo
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  #21  
Old 23rd July 2020, 13:29
eddyw eddyw is offline  
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Just like odours, remembered sounds can transport you back in time:-
eg Day trip Bristol-Ilfracombe by P&A Campbell, mv "Balmoral" (twin screw, Newbury Sirron 2 stroke, direct reversing)
Approaching harbour, standing on after deck. Steady rumble from deep inside ship. Melodious jangle of telegraph bells (stand by). Clang-clang (stop) rumble ceases. But for hiss of sea sliding past hull, silence. Then perfectly judged, clang-clang (half astern), pause, rumbling erupts as engines start up in reverse, followed by vibration and great washing noise as props bring ship to a neat stop and heaving lines go ashore.
https://i2-prod.bristolpost.co.uk/ne...b/Bal-1JPG.jpg

Last edited by eddyw; 23rd July 2020 at 13:31..
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  #22  
Old 23rd July 2020, 17:48
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Originally Posted by eddyw View Post
Just like odours, remembered sounds can transport you back in time:-
eg Day trip Bristol-Ilfracombe by P&A Campbell, mv "Balmoral" (twin screw, Newbury Sirron 2 stroke, direct reversing)
Approaching harbour, standing on after deck. Steady rumble from deep inside ship. Melodious jangle of telegraph bells (stand by). Clang-clang (stop) rumble ceases. But for hiss of sea sliding past hull, silence. Then perfectly judged, clang-clang (half astern), pause, rumbling erupts as engines start up in reverse, followed by vibration and great washing noise as props bring ship to a neat stop and heaving lines go ashore.
https://i2-prod.bristolpost.co.uk/ne...b/Bal-1JPG.jpg
Cool and evocative as you describe it
We had a ship where the shipper was a star performer during his regular visits to Hifa. He would across the dock to the berth at about 6 knots and at the last moment would put the CCP to full astern and glide gently alongside the berth to drop the ropes ashore. Until one day........ he went to full astern and only got a lot of thrashing around at the stern but no sign of the ship wanting to stop . Two crankpins in the CCP hub had sheared resulting in two blades astern and two blades ahead. The net result; dirty underpants on the bridge, a big gash down the side of the bow and some dockers who put in a surprisingly quick time for the 100 metre sprint
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  #23  
Old 24th July 2020, 00:14
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Talking of dirty underpants, watching what was going on, on the forepeak, during mooring at NOLA. Stevedore screaming up at Ray, from Liverpool, launche the hauling line. Monkey's fist twirled a couple of times and line launched.

The monkey's fist caught the stevedore squarely between the eyes and he fell, stone cold, like a "mighty oak"!

Ray, motionless, just said,"FLOCK! Dujya'll tink eez dead like!".

Several "docking bottles" persuaded the dockside crew that all was OK.

Sorry, diversion from thread title, but remebered the anecdote!

Rgds.
Dave
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  #24  
Old 24th July 2020, 02:49
Alan Maggs Alan Maggs is offline  
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Never forget the roar of escaping steam as deck line bursts on the main deck of a raised quarter decker when a slug of water too big for drain cocks too handle brings about demise of corroded line. SS YANDERRA 1965
Incidentally Somewhere I have recordings of
twin triple expansion engines flat out at 198 rpm on ex corvette AKUNA II heading into Singapore in 1978 also last 4 cyl balanced triple expansion engine at sea off East Coast Australia 1988 SS SOUTH STEYNE. In both cases recordings include walk through stoke hold.
Maggsy
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  #25  
Old 26th July 2020, 20:59
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One noise I loved from a safe distance, was the 'steam blowout' of a new boiler and the bigger the better. The first time I heard it was at Ferrybridge 'C' PS (4x500MW) during commissioming of the No.1 unit; Like half a dozen Concords although 1965 so before them.
The S/Htr steam legs were arranged to bypass the turbine and were routed up to the turbine hall roof. A 'target' panel in the steam flow, just outside of the steam outlet, gave indication of how much debris was being discharged and the whole process would continue until clear - maybe 4 or 5 blows were needed from the S/H outlets and a couple from the re-heat. They were big boilers - 3,450,000 lb/hr at MCR - 2500 psi/568*C
The first blow showed up how flimsy the temporary pipe supports were as they collapsed and blew all the gravel off the turbine hall roof!!
In my time I managed to see/hear the steam blows on 4 units at Ferry C, 2 blows at Ironbridge, 2 blows at Grain and 2 blows at Ince PS. If I wasn't on shift I'd go in anyway.

JJ.
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