Master's Night Orders - Page 2 - Ships Nostalgia
18:19

Welcome
Welcome!Welcome to Ships Nostalgia, the world's greatest online community for people worldwide with an interest in ships and shipping. Whether you are crew, ex-crew, ship enthusiasts or cruisers, this is the forum for you. And what's more, it's completely FREE.

Click here to go to the forums home page and find out more.
Click here to join.
Log in
User Name Password

Master's Night Orders

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #26  
Old 24th March 2010, 19:25
John Tremelling John Tremelling is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 151
Talking of Bridge comforts.

I sailed as U/C 3rd Mate on a ship where the 2nd Mate was ALWAYS late by about 15 minutes for the graveyard watch. True to say that his wife was onboard, but he would stager onto the bridge, hand outstretched for a cup of coffee and grunt in reply to my handover. On this particular night, we were mid ocean, cannot remember where but off usual busy shipping lanes, so I shut the bridge doors, switched on the windscreen washers, (yes, a real modern posh ship) radar and clear view screen. On handover he staggered to the windscreen took his coffee and peered through the water pouring down the glass. I told him that it was raining heavily, radar was on, nothing on the radar. He grunted and I went to bed.

He never noticed that the Pakistani lookout was on the bridge wing in his rolled up shirt sleeves on a balmy night, in fact he never went outside for 2 hours!!!!

Jolly wheeze, but next day the Chief Engineer wondered how we had lost several tons of fresh water. 2nd Mate was thereafter always punctual.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 30th March 2010, 02:29
uk083590 uk083590 is offline  
Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 8
I like most on here have sailed with a variety of different masters, the worst for orders used to religiously write his, after the vessel left port, about 3 pages of the book (A4) for a 60 mile run

Another one used to say "there's the order book you fill it in, I'll sign it tomorrow"

whilst a different one used to sign it and leave it blank for us to write

I also always remember arriving off a port after loading, 12 hours to early, calling the old man , no locks, no boatman, etc , and the port being surprised when I gave them an hours notice, the certain master swore blind he'd left his orders on the chart table in the book, which neither myself or the 2nd mate had seen.

We later found them when we got along side and he sent the pair of us up the road to the super market , producing a piece of scrap paper out of his pocket with his shopping list on it, yes you've guessed it there where the night orders on the back!!!!!!!!!!!!! Certain people will know who the said master was , especially pilot mac

Last edited by uk083590; 30th March 2010 at 02:31.. Reason: remebered something else
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 30th March 2010, 10:50
NoR's Avatar
NoR NoR is offline  
Senior Member
Department: Deck
Active: 1963 - 1979
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 2,214
Whilst coasting an 'X' on the chart with "call me" next to it.

The best masters kept night orders brief and often none at all.
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 30th March 2010, 12:06
Hugh Ferguson's Avatar
Hugh Ferguson Hugh Ferguson is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
My location
Posts: 5,535
An old pilot colleague of mine happened to have been in the Shaw Savill, RUNIC, when she steamed onto the Middleton Reef in 1961 and stayed there. I seem to recall that he had just turned in after his watch when it happened.
It was to be some years later that a yachtsman did the same and was able, before he was rescued, to broach some of the remaining cargo in order to sustain himself until rescuers arrived.
I'd love to know what the night orders had been aboard that ship.
The "thumbnail" was scanned from the excellent book, Shaw Savill & Albion by Richard P de Kerbrech (Engineer)
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Shaw Savill's RUNIC 001.jpg (140.2 KB, 164 views)
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 30th March 2010, 14:16
Hugh Ferguson's Avatar
Hugh Ferguson Hugh Ferguson is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
My location
Posts: 5,535
If anyone had ever thought of an epitaph, or an in memoriam for the British Merchant Navy, this must be it! It is all that remains of the once mighty Shaw Savill & Albion company, one of the greatest of all of those British shipping companies whose names were forever tripping off of the tongues of the once many seafarers.
In the pilot service to which I once belonged there was a Mr Smalley. Mr Smalley was the selected pilot for Shaw Savill, and he was so fully employed in that capacity that we rarely ever saw him taking a turn in the Dungeness pilot cutter. He spent so much of his piloting time aboard those ships that the company became known-at least amonst pilots- as Shaw Savill & Smalley.
I wonder if the Runic's "Night Order" book is still resting on her chart table: nothing to be written in it any longer, nor in any other.

Last edited by Hugh Ferguson; 30th March 2010 at 18:26.. Reason: Change a word
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 4th April 2010, 15:34
John Hebblewhite John Hebblewhite is offline  
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 80
The reason for modern night orders to be complete and cover everything and to be written every night at sea and with some auditors in port is that they are subject to inspection on a vessel's many audits in my case tankers. If they are not up to spec then it is noted as a failure on the ships audit report for fitness. I hope this explains why they are so comprehensive.
The old phrase " call me if any doubt" is not enough to satisfy the auditors.

Rgds John
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 5th April 2010, 14:45
CAPTAIN JEREMY CAPTAIN JEREMY is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Navigation
Active: 1974 - Present
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 217
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Hebblewhite View Post
The reason for modern night orders to be complete and cover everything and to be written every night at sea and with some auditors in port is that they are subject to inspection on a vessel's many audits in my case tankers. If they are not up to spec then it is noted as a failure on the ships audit report for fitness. I hope this explains why they are so comprehensive.
The old phrase " call me if any doubt" is not enough to satisfy the auditors.

Rgds John
Certainly it is part of being audited. However, I ensure that mine are comprehensive and unambiguous to ensure that the officers on duty fully understand what is required. They may seem repetitive on longer passages, but there should be no excuse or misunderstanding. Even with the specific night orders written, and mine and the company's standing orders, I find that it is no guarantee for incident free watchkeeping!!
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 14th April 2010, 12:20
Andrew Craig-Bennett's Avatar
Andrew Craig-Bennett Andrew Craig-Bennett is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Office / Administration
Active: 1974 - Present
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1,249
I have on my desk a document, running to nine pages, on "How to Write Master's Standing Orders and Night Orders". It is issued by a prominent Flag State (I blush to say which) as guidance to Masters sailing under its flag.
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 14th April 2010, 20:24
Shipbuilder Shipbuilder is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 2,262
As a radio officer, such things never bothered me. But in the Falklands, 1982, I was required to keep anchor watches for about three months. I am sure our captain wrote night orders, but I have no recollection of actually reading them. If I had got in a mess, I would not have had the slightest hesitation in calling him and I am sure he would not have minded. Remember years later, being roused from a deep sleep a few hours before arrival Cape Town by a hysterical passenger hammering on my door screaming we were heading for the rocks and the bridge was in darkness and no-one was there. As I rushed off to the bridge, I was shouting at the top of my voice for him to "shut up," bellowing that the bridge was always dark at night or the OOW couldn't see out. Furthermore, when in an alleyway with only three cabins, R/O, Chief Officer and Captain, why call me (R/O) if he thought the ship was in "grave and imminent danger?" When we got there, we found C/Off placidly pacing back and forth in the darkness as the lights of table Mountain spread before us. I just left them to it. Next morning at breakfast, (passengers having left), Captain (Same one as at Falklands) says casually (whilst grinning), "Heard all the shouting last night, did you have to make such a row?" I asked why he hadn't emerged, but was simply told that I "appeared to be dealing with the situation quite well and he assumed I didn't require assistance!"

What the bottom line is, as far as I am concerned, is that most ship's officers from captain down, do have a degree of common sense!

Just thought this simple tale might amuse you!

Bob
__________________

Miniature Merchant Ships
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 14th April 2010, 22:11
Hugh Ferguson's Avatar
Hugh Ferguson Hugh Ferguson is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
My location
Posts: 5,535
Lovely story, Bob, I enjoyed that!
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 15th April 2010, 21:03
ioncomike ioncomike is offline  
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 9
I remember on passage from Manchester to Montreal -- proceeding at full speed. keep a sharp lookout for icebergs!!!!!!!
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 15th April 2010, 23:39
NoR's Avatar
NoR NoR is offline  
Senior Member
Department: Deck
Active: 1963 - 1979
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 2,214
Quote:
The reason for modern night orders to be complete and cover everything and to be written every night at sea and with some auditors in port is that they are subject to inspection on a vessel's many audits
I feel sorry for Masters these days having to write reams of bullshit just to keep the jobsworths happy.
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 10th May 2010, 23:41
kevinseery kevinseery is offline  
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Hebblewhite View Post
The reason for modern night orders to be complete and cover everything and to be written every night at sea and with some auditors in port is that they are subject to inspection on a vessel's many audits in my case tankers. If they are not up to spec then it is noted as a failure on the ships audit report for fitness. I hope this explains why they are so comprehensive.
The old phrase " call me if any doubt" is not enough to satisfy the auditors.

Rgds John
Unfortunately this is so true. It is all repetition of everything in the Management System which the OOW has already signed to say he understands. It makes the Master's Night Orders the same as checklists - prone to being signed as a matter of course. It doesn't do anything to improve safety in my opinion.
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 30th November 2010, 10:52
Michal-S's Avatar
Michal-S Michal-S is offline  
Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Deck
Active: 1983 - Present
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 66
I experienced young 2nd Mate, caught watching DVD while navigating at night, looking at me innocently and claiming that I had never, specifically, prohibited that kind of activities on the bridge. My standard standing orders contained only some general remarks of sharp lookout. My fault!
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 30th November 2010, 11:26
CAPTAIN JEREMY CAPTAIN JEREMY is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Navigation
Active: 1974 - Present
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 217
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevinseery View Post
Unfortunately this is so true. It is all repetition of everything in the Management System which the OOW has already signed to say he understands. It makes the Master's Night Orders the same as checklists - prone to being signed as a matter of course. It doesn't do anything to improve safety in my opinion.
When I go to the bridge in the evening to write my night orders, I check the situation, navigation, traffic operational status etc. After I have written my night orders, I then discuss them with the OOW, and stress any particular requirements that I have, and tell them to also explain them to their relief. It seems to help.

I have not come across anyone watching a DVD on watch, but did a check on the browsing history of the bridge computer one day, and found a whole host of Russian dating sites were being viewed ..... but not for long!!
Reply With Quote
  #41  
Old 30th November 2010, 13:34
R58484956's Avatar
Super Moderator
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1952 - 1965
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 14,864
Greetings Michal-S and welcome to SN. Bon voyage.
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 1st December 2010, 00:57
Hawkeye Hawkeye is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 1,168
I did an anchor watch on the Sea Cadet Training ship - Royalist. At that time the Master Standing Orders took into account the wind force. The orders were basically: 1. If the wind strength went above a certain point, 2. If any land came into the radar ring he'd set up, & 3. If in any doubts, call me.
I had to call him twice during the night. The first time was when the wind did get up, but dropped by the time he got there. The second one was abit more amusing. I sent a cadet to do a round of the open deck, to check if everything was ok. (having caught him having 40 winks on watch). He walked round and said everything was ok. Looking forward I wasn't so sure, so sent him round again. On return, again said everything was ok, but there was still something in the back of my mind saying something was not quite right. Sent him a third time, but went with him. Got to the front of the ship where it was very dark. About to walk on when the problem hit me. It shouldn't have been dark. There should have been lit in that area, by the anchor light. It was out. Sent the cadet to get the master up whilst I stayed and tried to fix it, but couldn't. On return to the cockpit area, the sailing master was there, in just a towel. Asked what has happened to the anchor. 'Nothing, the light has gone out, that was all'. The message he'd got from the cadet (who was now trying to make himself small & hide somewhere) was that the anchor had gone, hense his rush to the cockpit. Neither of us could repair the light, so we just switched on the forward deck lights instead. Reported this to my relief at four in the morning pointing out the 'new' anchor light.
I got thanked for calling him out at during breakfast, but the cadet didn't half get some ribbing from the others when they found out.

Last edited by Hawkeye; 1st December 2010 at 01:00..
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 1st December 2010, 20:17
sidsal sidsal is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 1,429
Just after ww2 I was 2nd Mate of a tanker - the OWYHEE - Panamanian flag where the master and Mate ( demoted master) were drunks. Master used to write copious nightorders - "call me when...." etc but he was always dead to the world and couldn't be awakened. So one just carried on - often navigating tricky areas s.g. Bahrein Island to Ras Tanura. I eventually wlaked off the ship in Le Havre, fearing for my ticket.
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 23rd December 2010, 01:39
Diver Diver is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Tugs
Department: Deck
Active: 1958 - 1989
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 226
Most of the cos I worked for had standing night orders which remained the same until he changed them , then he had the nightly orders , course changes , expected sighting , weather concerns , and the post by KLAATU83
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 3rd January 2011, 10:59
3knots's Avatar
3knots 3knots is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 116
Some years ago we were due to raise Minicoy Is. light about 02:30 hrs - by memory it had a 26 mile range. I wrote in the night orders to "... call me when the light was sighted, or when the racon was sighted on the radar, or at 02:30 hours if not sighted before." I also set my alarm clock for 02:20 hrs, and got up as soon as it rang. It gave me time to dress before the expected call. At 02:30 there was no call. I waited a few minutes as I thought the 2/M was probably putting a position on the chart. By 02:35 there was still no call, and I was wondering "Why?" At 02:40 I went onto the bridge. The first thing I saw was Minicoy's light flashing; and when I glanced at the radar there was the racon. The 2/M, who hailed from the country that now regularly claims to be the world's greatest supplier of seafarers, welcomed me warmly but with a little surprise in his voice ... and then he asked if I was having trouble sleeping. I asked whether he had read the night orders and he replied "yes". So I considered it appropriate to go over those orders with him and enquire whether he understood them. He replied that "Yes, he did understand them". I then asked why he had not called me as instructed. In a rather hurt tone of voice he replied ... "But Sir, you were sleeping!" I guess I should have stipulated that I should be called whether or not I was sleeping ... he left the company's employ shortly after.
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old 3rd January 2011, 13:28
vasco's Avatar
vasco vasco is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 675
The vetters are at it again. It is no longer sufficient to write observe standing orders and then any thing pertinent for that night.

Now bow crossing, cpa distances must be written in everynight, reduced visibulity distances for calling Master. It can take up half a page re-writng the same thing everynight that is already in the standing orders and/or company instructions.

Bloody pathetic really.
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 3rd January 2011, 17:34
Ron Stringer's Avatar
Ron Stringer Ron Stringer is offline
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Radio Officer
Active: 1960 - 1966
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
My location
Posts: 6,313
Minicoy

3Knots

During the Monsoon, Minicoy was a thing to be feared since our old Radiolocator IV radar was pushed to pick up such a low-lying target. I lived on a knife-edge hoping that it would not pack up at a crucial moment.

Strange to see that the place is now a holiday destination (scroll down the page) at

http://travelmasticom.blogspot.com/2...kshadweep.html
__________________
Ron
_____________________________________________

Never regret growing older. It is a privilege denied to many. Don't worry about old age - it doesn't last.
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 21st March 2011, 14:00
ian283 ian283 is offline  
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 40
Thank you all for the interesting stories that you have put up for us to read.

I have never laughed so much. ex3/0 1960
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old 22nd March 2011, 19:24
Vital Sparks Vital Sparks is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 176
I sailed with one Master who's standing orders included not erasing the TV transmitter locations and transmission range arcs drawn on all north west europe charts (Passages were planned to maximise time within TV transmitter range).
Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old 23rd March 2011, 03:59
lakercapt lakercapt is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Deck
Active: 1952 - 1998
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
My location
Posts: 2,701
Always thought that Night Orders were really a crock but necessary as a GYA.
Why this was continued I don't understand as the mates on watch were all required to be qualified and during the day did not need Day Orders.
As responsible watch keepers it should never have been necessary to remind them of their duties.
I know I did not take kindly as a watch keeping mate to having to read in many cases drivel repeated parrot fashion e.g. keep a good lookout etc. What were we there for?
As master I was castigated for not writing Night Orders and reluctantly did but only a minimum and hopefully constructive advise.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
'A Night in Kobe' (Poem) Sow-Sow-La Blue Funnel Line 11 23rd August 2014 01:19
Wreck of the Sailing Ship Dundonald Iain Crosbie Wrecks 5 6th December 2010 23:50
Royal Caribbean Orders Largest Ship newda898 Modern Cruise Ships 15 24th May 2009 20:15
More Cruise Ship Orders fred henderson News and Views from the Shipping World 2 2nd April 2007 20:22
$10mill in orders for Korea's big 3 rushie News and Views from the Shipping World 0 2nd October 2006 12:18



Support SN


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.1.0 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.