Could you kill a ship? - Ships Nostalgia
19:41

Welcome
Welcome!Welcome to Ships Nostalgia, the world's greatest online community for people worldwide with an interest in ships and shipping. Whether you are crew, ex-crew, ship enthusiasts or cruisers, this is the forum for you. And what's more, it's completely FREE.

Click here to go to the forums home page and find out more.
Click here to join.
Log in
User Name Password

Could you kill a ship?

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 16th September 2011, 01:33
John Briggs's Avatar
John Briggs John Briggs is offline  
Forever a Seaman
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Navigation
Active: 1956 - 1973
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
My location
Posts: 8,604
Could you kill a ship?

I was looking at a photo of the ex City of Pretoria heading for the breakers yard under a new name and flag and thought to myself, what a fine looking ship.

I then saw a very good photo of ships being demolished in a breakers yard and thought to myself, what a terrible shame, the slow death of some fine looking ships and I thought 'I could never do that job'.

Could any of you watch a lovely old lady of the sea arrive in fully functioning condition at the breakers and then be the first up the gangway with your oxy torch and start cutting her to pieces?

It would be the same if someone gave me a live chicken and said that was for lunch and all I had to do was wring its neck - I couldn't do it!
__________________
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]JB
Inside every older person is a younger person - wondering what the hell happened.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 16th September 2011, 06:39
kingorry kingorry is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 149
Attempts at ship preservation have almost always been failures. Take the case of the MANXMAN. I sailed on her every year she was in Steam Packet service, and was her Purser in the early 1970s. When she finished her IOMSPCo service in 1982 she went to Preston, then to Liverpool, on to Hull and finished up in the Pallion Yard, where, for all I know, she may still be languishing.
The MANXMAN has now been out of service and derelict for much longer than she was in active Steam Packet service.
I prefer to remember her as a fine working ship, not as a failed nightclub venture - the 'Manxman Princess' she was called. So, yes, she should have been broken up in 1982, and I would have been the first to have taken the torch to her. It would have put her out of her undoubted misery, and would have been a dignified end.
When a ship, however fine and much-loved, has reached the end of her working life, she should be broken up, and I would be the first to start that process. The ship will then be remembered for what she was; not as a decaying derelict.
kingorry (R.783921)
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 16th September 2011, 07:11
dom dom is offline  
member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 13,475
dom

no,to see those ships in that state is not nice,better off sinking them at sea
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 16th September 2011, 08:33
G0SLP G0SLP is online now  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1978 - Present
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
My location
Posts: 540
I know where you're coming from, John, but OTOH there are certain ships where there would be a line of volunteers prepared to do the run to Alang/Aliaga etc...

Mark
__________________
Mark Coultas
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 16th September 2011, 10:01
Thats another Story Thats another Story is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 3,615
passing the breakers yard often along the dock road in Liverpool it is a very sad sight seeing ships being ripped apart for scrap the miles they have traveled the storms the sites but most of all it was your home weather good memories or bad. but most of the old are turned into new and the new adventures of the boats /ships that have yet to come?john
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 16th September 2011, 11:32
sparkie2182 sparkie2182 is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
My location
Posts: 19,069
No, I couldn't John.

We are, however, in the minority.

Shoresiders see ships as lumps of metal........nothing more.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 16th September 2011, 11:46
Cisco's Avatar
Cisco Cisco is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Navigation
Active: 1963 - 2006
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
My location
Posts: 6,271
I've sailed on more than a few that should have been put down early and would never have been missed .... old ships, old cars , old women..... old is old.... to much trouble with the plumbing and pipework in all of them....

Sorry but I don't get wet eyed over old ships...

PS at least you can get $$$$ for an old ship......
__________________
Nostalgia isn't what it used to be.

Last edited by Cisco; 16th September 2011 at 11:49.. Reason: ps
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 16th September 2011, 15:41
Tmac1720's Avatar
Tmac1720 Tmac1720 is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1964 - 1997
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
My location
Posts: 7,013
Couldn't agree more with your feelings JB, although I never sailed on any of the ships I helped build (sea trials and ferry trips don't count) All the guys I worked with always kept a "personal" interest in the fate of the vessels after they departed from the 'yard. In my own case I have a particular affection for yard number 1720 "British Steel" for several personal reasons as you know. As a large bulk carrier it could hardly be regarded as a beauty but the thought of taking the oxy cutter to any part of her gives me the heebee jeebees...
__________________
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]Oul hand
Money can't buy happiness but it's more comfortable to cry in a Porsche than a Skoda
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 16th September 2011, 16:59
chadburn chadburn is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 10,573
I had a visit to nearby RAF Leeming sometime ago where they are scrapping Tornado F3's and they had the same problem, they had to use civilian's contractors as the RAF lad's who maintained them during the aircraft's flying life did not want to take the job/posting to return the aircraft to produce after they had removed "blue label" spare's.
__________________
Geordie Chief

From Grey Funnel to any Funnel, just show him/ me the money Mabel

Last edited by chadburn; 16th September 2011 at 17:02..
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 16th September 2011, 21:59
holland25 holland25 is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Radio Officer
Active: 1956 - 1970
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 1,054
Bit off track, but in the mid 1970s I worked at Heathrow in the BOAC computer centre at Hatton Cross. They had just done a deal with Boeing and I believe as part of the deal they had to scrap their fleet of VC10s. An area was set up next to the maintenance hangar and the planes were brought in one at a time and ripped apart and carted away as scrap. That caused a great deal of angst among the BOAC staff.I think some of the planes survived and were taken up by the RAF. In my opinion preserved ships have a sad feel about them, the only one that seemed, to me, to be happy, was the Jerimiah O'brien.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 16th September 2011, 23:13
Donald McGhee's Avatar
Donald McGhee Donald McGhee is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Deck
Active: 1964 - 1970
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
My location
Posts: 1,100
I think the only people who have a soft spot for ships are those who actually sailed on and lived on them, as said by John P, very true John.

Ships were not only your home, but your workplace and means of travel to distant shores, no question about it and to see where you once lived is just as sad as seeing your house, where memories were made, being ripped apart.

None of us who ever sailed the oceans will ever forget the living entities that were once our floating homes and work places. Ships were alive, call me daft, plenty have!


Briggsy, well said, I fully agree.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 17th September 2011, 15:31
Hugh Ferguson's Avatar
Hugh Ferguson Hugh Ferguson is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
My location
Posts: 5,535
They killed this one after others had done their very worst to do likewise and somebody felt so cut up about it he/she wrote a poem in memorian.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg GLENROY poem by H.G..JPG (292.9 KB, 164 views)
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 17th September 2011, 19:58
Hugh Ferguson's Avatar
Hugh Ferguson Hugh Ferguson is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
My location
Posts: 5,535
See HERE for how the business of killing ships goes on apace at Gadani Beach. Unfortunately, it takes a toll on the people who do it; on average one of them is killed every day doing this dangerous work!
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 17th September 2011, 21:40
Cisco's Avatar
Cisco Cisco is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Navigation
Active: 1963 - 2006
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
My location
Posts: 6,271
Some interesting photos here of Oriana and Canberra that I hadn't seen before... http://www.saintsweb.co.uk/showthrea...to-my-old-ship...
Surely it would have been better for Oriana to have gone to the knackers with her head held high?
__________________
Nostalgia isn't what it used to be.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 18th September 2011, 01:06
spongebob's Avatar
spongebob spongebob is offline
Spongebob
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1957 - 1961
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 8,800
If you were lucky enough to serve aboard a ship where you had your own cabin, or even shared one with good mates it became a home away from home, a hideaway retreat for off duty hours and, perhaps carrying the mood too far, akin to a mother’s care with the attendant warmth and succour.

That is much the feeling that I remember of my ships in the fifties, in all a pleasant way of life and to transpose these memories to a point of the death of those vessels the act of breakage for scrap comes across as the cruelest fate that could become her.
Far rather a consignment to the deep at the end of a useful life but emotions aside, I guess this is now a world of recycling in all its forms

Bob
__________________
spongebob,
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 18th September 2011, 02:00
John Briggs's Avatar
John Briggs John Briggs is offline  
Forever a Seaman
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Navigation
Active: 1956 - 1973
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
My location
Posts: 8,604
There is little man has made that approaches anything in nature, but a ship does.
There is not much man has made that calls to all the best in him, but a ship does.

Anon
__________________
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]JB
Inside every older person is a younger person - wondering what the hell happened.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 25th September 2011, 13:13
brvhrtjimmy's Avatar
brvhrtjimmy brvhrtjimmy is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Maritime Enthusiast
Department: Dockworker
Active: 1961 - Present
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 127
yes i couldnt do it i mentioned ships in the breakers yard in a previous thread,and i still maintain anyone with ship connection in any form should feel sad to see it happen i know i did
James Barr (Brvhrtjimmy)
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 25th September 2011, 14:06
Dickyboy's Avatar
Dickyboy Dickyboy is online now
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Deck
Active: 1964 - 2009
 
Join Date: May 2009
My location
Posts: 8,549
I think, for me it's not the inanimate nature of the ship that affects me. It's the fact that people not only worked in them, but also lived in them. It was our, or someone else's home, sometimes for long periods of time. A bit like seeing ones old house being knocked down. Unlike Cars, trains, buses or aeroplanes which go to the scrappy without hardly a mention. They don't have the emotional attachment that ships do. To us seafarers at least.
I wonder how many were affected with sadness when the worst ship they ever sailed on went to the breakers?
__________________
Good advice is usually ignored, but that's no reason for not giving it. Miss Marple.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 25th September 2011, 14:22
Pat Kennedy's Avatar
Pat Kennedy Pat Kennedy is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 13,789
To be honest I never had a great deal of emotional attachment to any ship I sailed in. Some I definitely liked more than others but at the end of the day they were just places I worked in, and lived in at the same time. Much like an oil rig I suppose.
I did however feel sad when, working in Cammel Lairds in the 70s, they hauled the floating crane, 'Cammell' up a vacant slipway for demolition, and I got the job of driving the cantilever crane lifting the scrap steel onto lorrys.
This floating crane was the crane driver's unofficial home from home, a place to go and relax when there was no immediate work for you. I had many a slap up breakfast in the commodious control cabin of the Cammell which was very like a railway signal box in design and size.
But, although I remember everyone of the 50 odd ships I sailed in, it never unduly bothered me when I heard they had gone for scrap.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 26th September 2011, 21:19
jmcg's Avatar
jmcg jmcg is online now
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Deck
Active: 1966 - 1983
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 3,815
Now then chaps - its hard to imagine the inner feelings of one Joe Bates bosun of Alfred Holt's HECTOR from her slipway days of 1950 at Belfast to July 1972 when he took her to Sing Cheng Yungs yard in Kaohsiung

Bosun on her for 22 years - builders to breakers. Joe was a hard but fair man and no doubt a tear or two was shed on that fateful day in Kaohsiung.


BW

J

Last edited by jmcg; 27th September 2011 at 09:55.. Reason: typo
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 27th September 2011, 08:01
TOM ALEXANDER's Avatar
TOM ALEXANDER TOM ALEXANDER is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Deck
Active: 1958 - 1960
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 2,929
Quote:
Originally Posted by dom View Post
no,to see those ships in that state is not nice,better off sinking them at sea
I don't know Dom. I was part of the delivery crew on the "Bird of Paradise", Greenock to Port au Spain, Trinidad in Feb 1960. She was brand new then. I see now she is wrecked, laying on her side on top of a reef just outside Port au Spain. I don't know what befell her, but it's a sad thing to see any vessel hung out to slowly rot and for all to see.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 27th September 2011, 11:17
John Briggs's Avatar
John Briggs John Briggs is offline  
Forever a Seaman
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Navigation
Active: 1956 - 1973
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
My location
Posts: 8,604
I agree with dom. Sunk at sea, not stranded on a reef, but consigned to the deep. A dignified and suitable end to a life spend plying the oceans.

Unfortunately as long as ship breakers pay good money for old ships that will never happen.
__________________
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]JB
Inside every older person is a younger person - wondering what the hell happened.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 11th October 2011, 15:14
TommyRob's Avatar
TommyRob TommyRob is offline
Senior Member
Organisation: Maritime Enthusiast
Department: Office / Administration
Active: 1953 - 2010
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 2,735
I walked into our local Co-op one morning to hear a group of women discussing what I imagined to be a feisty old acquaintance. "She knew it was the end and just refused take it" was the gist. They were actually talking about the Warspite on Cornish rocks on her last voyage and it was as if a family member was involved. Ever since then I have had a silent cheer when yet another ship foiled the breakers - as long as nobody got hurt of course.

Tom
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 12th October 2011, 09:38
gil mayes gil mayes is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 2,213
Dear oh dear, such sentimentality, cut them up and start again, it has always been about recycling.
Gil.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 12th October 2011, 11:03
John Briggs's Avatar
John Briggs John Briggs is offline  
Forever a Seaman
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Navigation
Active: 1956 - 1973
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
My location
Posts: 8,604
Gil, you are obviously not a seaman!
__________________
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]JB
Inside every older person is a younger person - wondering what the hell happened.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Was "slave ship" used to describe a barge/ship being towed? JMB Ship Research 1 30th June 2010 10:57
Collission and Fire in the Kill Van Kull Channel Beartracks Wrecks 0 7th July 2009 17:55
Scapa Flow ship to ship transfers rushie News and Views from the Shipping World 0 9th February 2007 08:33
Anti whaling ship labelled a pirate ship rushie News and Views from the Shipping World 7 11th January 2007 09:54



Support SN


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.1.0 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.