Mystery Porthole - Ships Nostalgia
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Mystery Porthole

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  #1  
Old 17th July 2016, 13:38
panama kid panama kid is offline
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Mystery Porthole

Anyone have any idea what kind of ship this porthole came out of and how old it may be? I can't find any identifying marks on it. The main body looks like bronze with brass parts.
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  #2  
Old 17th July 2016, 15:36
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panama kid

On behalf of the 'SN Moderating Team', welcome aboard.

Hopefully, someone will be able to help with the information you are seeking. Good luck
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  #3  
Old 17th July 2016, 21:39
jg grant jg grant is offline  
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Hello and welcome from NZ. How about the Nautilus from 20,000 leagues under the sea? Seriously, I have no idea but enjoy the site.
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  #4  
Old 17th July 2016, 22:03
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Here is a similar one. Allegedly from the SS ANGLIA passenger ship sunk in ww1.
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  #5  
Old 17th July 2016, 22:48
Barrie Youde Barrie Youde is offline  
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Portholes are cheap today ...............etc.

Both of these are clearly of the inset variety, commonly used in the hull of a vessel as opposed to in any inboard accommodation. The inset is to protect the glass when ranging alongside any lock-wall or dock-wall - although the glass still remained vulnerable in the event that a pudding-type corkfender might become lodged therein.
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  #6  
Old 17th July 2016, 23:10
Laurie Ridyard Laurie Ridyard is online now  
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Looks like the ones they had in submarines....
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  #7  
Old 17th July 2016, 23:25
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A warm welcome aboard from the Philippines. Please enjoy all this great site has to offer
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  #8  
Old 17th July 2016, 23:28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Laurie Ridyard View Post
Looks like the ones they had in submarines....
Aren't you thinking of screen doors?

This comes from elsewhere on this site, but I am not sure where, so I am pinching someones joke.
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  #9  
Old 18th July 2016, 08:08
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Greetings panama kid and welcome to SN. Bon voyage.
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  #10  
Old 18th July 2016, 11:23
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"Patent opening porthole."

I have seen this feature in photos in old passenger ship photos. Obviously for easier for passengers to use and avoid porthole 'kunckle'.

Anyhow, here is a photo taken of AQUITANIA. I suspect the idea was also to catch some of the breeze.

Stephen
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  #11  
Old 18th July 2016, 11:33
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Another photo of AQUITANIA showing the patent portholes.

Does not to have 'deadlights' over the port. Perhaps not necessary required on the higher decks... or not in the bows.

Stephen
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  #12  
Old 18th July 2016, 21:22
panama kid panama kid is offline
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That was interesting, thanks
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  #13  
Old 18th July 2016, 21:25
panama kid panama kid is offline
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Here is a link to a youtube video of that porthole operating.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MbgNppQ8XWM
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  #14  
Old 19th July 2016, 00:35
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Thanks. Here is the thing. The porthole 'seems' that the handle is the SIDE of the port and the main spindle is over the top. This is likely incorrect. Turn it around 90 degree. The spindle should be vertical and the handle would be at the bottom. Then you would be same as in the photos. If this was fitted in a hull the handle would be below the port and this makes sense and the glass would catch wind along the side of. the ship.

This is not a small port. Likely at least 12 inches dia.
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  #15  
Old 19th July 2016, 08:09
david freeman david freeman is offline  
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Mystery Porthole

Hi to all, How about an admiralty porthole, in some shore side establishment, say a diving school and it's depth diving chamber.
Question Is the seal of the porthole water tight: especially in the case when closed if this particular porthole is submerged, down to the margin line, on say a class 1 passenger ship?
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  #16  
Old 19th July 2016, 08:11
david freeman david freeman is offline  
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Hi to all, How about an admiralty porthole, in some shore side establishment, say a diving school and it's depth diving chamber.
Question Is the seal of the porthole water tight: especially in the case when closed if this particular porthole is submerged, down to the margin line, on say a class 1 passenger ship?
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  #17  
Old 19th July 2016, 10:16
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Welcome onboard to SN and enjoy the voyage
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  #18  
Old 19th July 2016, 11:02
Barrie Youde Barrie Youde is offline  
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There must be thousands of vessels which have have had glass portholes cose to the waterline.

The Liverpool Pilot Cutters were merely one such class of vessel and it is a relief to report that all of the ports near the waterline were sealed tight and were not openable at all. Presumably today there are regulations which would govern the necessary height above the waterline before a hull-porthole may be made openable? I do not know what any such regulations might provide, but their purpose would be obvious.
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  #19  
Old 19th July 2016, 11:41
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An openable porthole is an openable porthole!

You can the standard porthole that is permanently closed used for many purposes. Most likely from too close to the waterline.

Opening portholes you will find with like the standard type with overhead hinged and with the type with deadlights.

Small port and sized up to about, what 12 to 14 inches can be just heavy to handle. That is.... too heavy to lift.

Then you will find types like in older passenger ship with hinges on the side. Some circular and some with straight sides and curved tops. Not usually with deadlight.

Then the type we have here. As I mentioned, found in AQUITANIA. I doubt this type would be found down on lower decks and unlikely to have deadlights. Watertight? Well, would be pretty useless unless watertight. Anyhone who had ever used a porthole knows that even less that perfect seal and you will get a dribble of water down your head.

I think this one is from a very older era.


Back about 1965 I was watching an old US Navy cruiser coming alongside at the Naval Annex in Bermuda. Their own tug was not available and so the MARINIA was out for the job. The tug was pushing near the bow, but came in at an angle and the tug 'slipped' down the side. There was a row of ports and they were similar as in our question.... and opened. The tug went down the side of the cruiser and took out a whole batch of them off. Oops!

Stephen
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  #20  
Old 19th July 2016, 12:01
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barrie Youde View Post
There must be thousands of vessels which have have had glass portholes cose to the waterline.
On alot of passenger ships built in the 1970's the crew cabins were the lowest line of portholes on the ships side close to the water line, they were the sealed type, and they had deadlights to secure them in the advent of bad weather..It made for some interesting veiwing when we had to go and close those deadlights.......

Cheers Frank................
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  #21  
Old 19th July 2016, 12:48
Barrie Youde Barrie Youde is offline  
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#20

Yes, those which I recall had deadlights, too, but I never did see them used, even in the worst of weather
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  #22  
Old 19th July 2016, 13:46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barrie Youde View Post
#20

Yes, those which I recall had deadlights, too, but I never did see them used, even in the worst of weather
Seen them used in even CALM seas!

I booked in the little PACIFIC PRINCESS for a short run Bermuda up to New York. I was told I could only get an inside. I was happy to see that I had an outside cabin... but down on the lowest deck. Fine, the waterline was just a few feet below the port, but sunshine is better than nothing. The next morning the ship was getting ready for sailing. The steward closed the deadlight down tight and he explained, "That is why they called it an 'inside'!"


As far as cruise ships I have NEVER seen any of the new builds. The ports, regardless of deck level, everything is sealed and cannot be opened. Something called about 'airconditioning'.
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  #23  
Old 20th July 2016, 11:09
jg grant jg grant is offline  
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The RFA Retainer had these dodgy portholes in the crew quarters. Not the usual in my experience which were ones with brass handles you could screw shut yourself. Retainer portholes had dogs with a keyway in them that required a special tool to tighten them up. Guess what? One key for about thirty to forty crew and nobody knew where the effin thing was when the weather turned iffy at night. Up top in serious weather, if she shipped greenies over the doorstep none of the officers cabins had a baffle. Sorry can't remember the name of the step. So once the water got in as the ship rolled, water would sluice in one cabin and then out then into the next one. What a ***** of a ship. I think she was ex Chungking a small passenger ship but whoever built her wants seeing to with the business end of a pineapple. Or maybe I mean the other end.
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  #24  
Old 27th November 2016, 08:28
Dewsk Dewsk is offline
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another mystery porthole

Hi
Am new to this , so sorry in advance if I have posted into the wrong area.

I have 2 portholes, purchased around 30 years ago from antique shop in UK .

One 12 inch in diameter, with leadcover, glass layer and 2 dog screws. It has a id GB15 on outer bessel. I am wondering what this might mean.

The other porthole, approx 10 inches in diameter ( is similar) with 81 or 18 on the leadlight cover. Hoping someone might have any info on what type of ship these are from.
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