Researching concrete ships - Ships Nostalgia
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Researching concrete ships

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  #1  
Old 25th February 2020, 14:02
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erlbon erlbon is offline
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Researching concrete ships

Hello everyone,

I'm working on a project about concrete ships and barges - in effect, this is mainly registering all the concrete hulls ever built and attempting to record their history.

Some fruits of my labour can be seen in the following map - https://drive.google.com/open?id=18D...74&usp=sharing

I recently came across a little bit of information about the fates of two ships which I discovered was sunk in the Iwo Jima breakwater in 1945, and joined this board to contribute.
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  #2  
Old 25th February 2020, 15:17
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Welcome to Ships Nostalgia Erlbon!
Your post is fascinating and will, I'm sure, be of interest to many members. A new thread in the Ship Research forum listing your world map would be an appropriate home for it.

Regards

Tony
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  #3  
Old 25th February 2020, 16:59
garryNorton garryNorton is offline
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The Solomon Islands had some rules for constriction of concrete small ship building as to size of mesh type of cement and gravel but it may not now exist as the rules were drafted before independence while it was a protectorate.They were based on Canadian rules and were made up by Ken Bradshall the then Deputy Marine Superintendent and the ODA in their records may have them.Also I think the NZ Marine Department may have some rules for making cement boats.
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Old 25th February 2020, 18:28
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Welcome on board, enjoy the site...

They used to build concrete boats/ships at Preston Dock, Lancashire, England

Cheers Frank
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  #5  
Old 25th February 2020, 18:30
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Was there a Norwegian built one called Denmark? https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/galle...ned-3f/cat/523
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  #6  
Old 25th February 2020, 18:41
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Originally Posted by stein View Post
Was there a Norwegian built one called Denmark? https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/galle...ned-3f/cat/523
Those images are actually taken at Frierfjorden in Porsgrunn. The manager of Porsgrunn Cementstøberi was invited to the USA to present their designs in early 1918, before the US started their own EFD project.

These images was published in the newspapers during his visit there. Somehow, the imagery has been mislabeled in the Library of Congress, and this leads to subsequent errors.

But Denmark built a handful of concrete ships as well. They are not to be forgotten. Only one of them are alive as by my reckoning, it's a small barge built in 1917, recently rescued from a stranded existence and now at quay in Prestø.
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  #7  
Old 25th February 2020, 18:44
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Can't seem to find the "edit" button to my reply here.

The images actually display a very smart technique in which you build the hull upside-down (which requires much less scaffolding), and then launch the boat that way, and let the boat turn itself upright when in water, due to some strategically placed airpockets.

This was also the main selling point of the Porsgrunn design.
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Old 25th February 2020, 20:36
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Reinforced ferro cement construction of smaller craft was commonplace in NZ during the 1960's and 1970's as an alternative to expensive timber or fibre glass type hulls , these were mainly ocean going yachts in the 30 to 60 foot length range .
A Welshman built one in the Uk , named it Souspan Foch ? Then sailed it to NZ before running aground on the Minerva Reef while attempting to sail to Queensland .
They were locally named floating septic tanks but many did journey the world from here.
Key to longilivity was the density of the plastering and the quality of the paint seal and protection to keep the sea water from the imbedded reinforcing mesh as any water penetration brought on destructive blisters locally called the 'pox'.
Many are still sailing as are many ferro pontoons afloat.

Bob
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  #9  
Old 25th February 2020, 23:01
matthew flinders matthew flinders is offline  
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Concrete Barges

I believe there are a number of ferrocement barges amongst the Purton Wrecks on the River Severn
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  #10  
Old 25th February 2020, 23:04
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https://londonist.com/london/history...hips-from-wwii
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Old 26th February 2020, 00:03
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Look up Concrete ships of Chesapeake bay. They form a breakwater around what is now Cherrystone park on the Eastern shore of Virginia near Cape Charles.
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Old 26th February 2020, 07:52
david freeman david freeman is offline  
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somewhere in my mind is devon/dockyard or a creek, and a RN coastal ship built (now a hulk- maybe a minesweeper class] in wwII 1944/5?. Maybe a dream, maybe within this web site -- facts-keep looking, GOOD LUCK.
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Old 26th February 2020, 07:54
david freeman david freeman is offline  
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Originally Posted by Bill.B View Post
Look up Concrete ships of Chesapeake bay. They form a breakwater around what is now Cherrystone park on the Eastern shore of Virginia near Cape Charles.
THEN OFF COURSE YOU HAVE OVERLOAD, and the Mulberry Harbour in France WWII
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Old 26th February 2020, 10:55
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All the Chesapeake bay concrete ships were real vessels and carried cargo. After the war they were sunk to form the breakwater. Sometimes called the Kiptopeke breakwater. In the UK they built two concrete schooners, Moliette and Violette, in Brightlingsea. The wreck of the Moliette is still on the mud off Mersey island.
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  #15  
Old 26th February 2020, 12:03
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erlbon View Post
Hello everyone,

I'm working on a project about concrete ships and barges - in effect, this is mainly registering all the concrete hulls ever built and attempting to record their history.

Some fruits of my labour can be seen in the following map - https://drive.google.com/open?id=18D...74&usp=sharing

I recently came across a little bit of information about the fates of two ships which I discovered was sunk in the Iwo Jima breakwater in 1945, and joined this board to contribute.
The barge at Greenhithe was there in 1981, It may have been owned by Everards
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  #16  
Old 26th February 2020, 13:23
Bill.B Bill.B is online now  
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Correction. Molliette and Violette were built by Pollocks at Faversham Kent. There are also a string of concrete lighters/barges forming a breakwater in Walton Backwaters Essex. Violette is part of Hoo marina in Kent along with other concrete lighters.
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  #17  
Old 27th February 2020, 06:53
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Thank you for the great interest in this thread - I believe I have noted most of the cases mentioned in my map already. if you have any information not listed on the map, please send me a PM.

Also; I have recognized that keeping track of all ferro-concrete yachts built from the -60s and up til now is an impossible task, so i'm only researching commercial-built concrete vessels, primarily connected to the emergency tonnage of WWI and WWII.
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  #18  
Old 27th February 2020, 06:59
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The barge at Greenhithe was there in 1981, It may have been owned by Everards
The Greenhithe barge is one of the more interesting cases. I've identified it as one of six built at W. C. French, Grays, Essex in 1943-1944. There should be some way of identifying which one it is (either St Anne, St Asaph, St Austell, St Bees, St Mawes or St Michael), but I fear it calls for someone on-site to search for clues and documents.

According to aerial photos from historicalimages.com, the barge have been in the same place since the 1960s.

One of her sisterships might have ended up her days buried in the banks of the Suir, Ireland - documentation here is very shoddy.
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  #19  
Old 27th February 2020, 11:38
Tommy Kirkpatrick Tommy Kirkpatrick is offline  
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Stronsay barge

A bit about the concrete barge at Stronsay in the Stronsay Limpet http://www.stronsaylimpet.co.uk/ISSUE163January2019.pdf
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  #20  
Old 27th February 2020, 13:00
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A bit about the concrete barge at Stronsay in the Stronsay Limpet http://www.stronsaylimpet.co.uk/ISSUE163January2019.pdf
Great stuff. I've emailed the author and provided him with pictures of the barge when fitting out.
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  #21  
Old 2nd March 2020, 14:03
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Hi Erlbon.
Alongside Mostyn Docks on the Welsh coast of the River Dee lies the rotting hulk of The TS Duke of Lancaster. She was supposed to be a Fun Ship but is now Rusting in Peace.
I told many years ago that Prior to her arrival two concrete badges were sunk on site to provide the foundation on which she sits. The oldest barge was said to have been built in Liverpool during WWII.
Steve.
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Old 4th March 2020, 21:24
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Hi Erlbon.
Alongside Mostyn Docks on the Welsh coast of the River Dee lies the rotting hulk of The TS Duke of Lancaster. She was supposed to be a Fun Ship but is now Rusting in Peace.
I told many years ago that Prior to her arrival two concrete badges were sunk on site to provide the foundation on which she sits. The oldest barge was said to have been built in Liverpool during WWII.
Steve.
I know someone involved with the DoL and asked about the barges, her reply:

"'One of the barges is a standard WW2 barge, but the other is a historic vessel, the Elmarine, built between the Sankey Canal and the Mersey at Fiddlers Ferry, near Warrington during WW1. She was the prototype for a number of very large barges of 1,000 tons built for the Admiralty in 1917 and 1918. One series of these were built as the Elmarine, in pre-cast concrete sections. Two, the Cretecamp and the Cretecove were built at Fiddlers Ferry.'"
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  #23  
Old 5th March 2020, 08:11
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How interesting Duncan. The barge is more interesting than the hulk design on top of it!
Steve.
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  #24  
Old 24th May 2020, 05:07
Keith Adams Keith Adams is offline
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Hello erlbon, As a schoolboy in 1939-45 WWII I was facinated with the fact that concrete vessels could float ! Evident pediatric by the numerous concrete barges in the Liverpool and Birkenhead Docks . Many still in use when i left the MN in 1961.
Here at the California States Seacliff Beach Park, we have the now wrecked and broken into three sections, the hulk of the WWI concrete tanker vessel "Palo Alto". The park HQ and gift shop has a museum with models and a film viewing room showing the history of the vessel. They gave a free hand out paper brochure including a photo of her on sea trials upon San Francisco Bay.
Of major interest to your studies is a superb paper back book titled Forever Facing South, The story of the Palo Alto authored by David W. Heron, published by Otter B Books, Santa Xcruz, CA. in July, 1991.ISBN 0-9617681-3-4
Many photos, even one of the engine. 435 ft vessel laid down at end of WW1 but first concrete not poured into the rebar framing until January 1919, and not launched until May 29, 1919. Commissioned October 1920. Was laid up for four years and then sold as surplus scrap having never carried cargo. Eventually towed to Aptos January 1930 and sunk for use as a ballroom. and amusement site. Spent most of its life as a fishing pier.
Recommend the book as, in addition to being a good read it contains history of US Concrete Ship programme and listed information sources.
Cheers, "Snowy". Keith Adams. Oh, I have the stock photo of the Palo Alto in my Shipsnostalgia file.
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