Captain(Commodore) Alan Davies - Page 3 - Ships Nostalgia
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Captain(Commodore) Alan Davies

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  #51  
Old 19th November 2010, 15:53
DaveM399 DaveM399 is online now  
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My first trip

Quote:
Originally Posted by JamesM View Post
gadgee,
You had a lucky escape!! I sailed with him on the Respect when I was doing my steam-time. He was a "pompass ass", and coupled with the fact that the C/E was "Tadger" Smith who was also full of his own, supposed importance, the atmosphere on board was awful. One of the worst I ever sailed on.
JamesM
My first trip was as a cadet with Tadger on the Inventor - I always thought that the "a" should have been replaced with an "o"!
  #52  
Old 19th November 2010, 17:37
Graham Wallace Graham Wallace is offline  
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Just out of interest, no comment on the article or the man, I have never met him.

I have come across his son who was an Engineering Apprentice.

Graham Wallace
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  #53  
Old 22nd November 2010, 12:13
Hoppy Hoppy is offline  
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Tadger..

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Originally Posted by JamesM View Post
Hoppy,
Could'nt have happened to a "nicer" bloke ........ hope they threw the book at him!
I was on the Respect as J/e during the Spithead 'trial' and he did make life awkward especially for junior staff. Yes, I really wound him up over the no boots in the control room policy .. I left a small thumb print in the engineer's log one day and he was going nuts over it . The next day, I printed my boot print onto paper and then sealed it in polythene and put it in the log book... never a word .. nothing and that got me worried and I shouldnt have done it I know ... he changed completely after that and never gave me anymore grief. I went to College with The commodores son ..Rick .
Best Wishes Hoppy
  #54  
Old 23rd November 2010, 10:47
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Well done mate ..... I like your style.
  #55  
Old 23rd November 2010, 12:03
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Difficult and sensitive subject, and despite the sensible caution advised by 'notwanted here', concerning the risk that relatives and close friends inadvertently come across such criticisms, nevertheless it is neither right to gag the views of those having the experience. As evidenced by others, JamesM was certainly not alone in having this bad experience.

With reference to the 'Gadgee' posting on Captain R.H.L. Friendship. He was my first Master four years earlier (1964) on British Power and I can only agree 100% with Gadgee - an absolute thorough gentleman, a great inspiration for Mates and Deck Apps alike, and well liked and respected by all on board.
  #56  
Old 25th November 2010, 19:17
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Strange how after all these years we remember the people who really hacked us off, and I mean really really hacked us off, not just those who we would not normally choose to socialise with, or those who were just mildly annoying.

Then you think back about the good guys, (not many galls in those days)the ones that made it all so worthwhile, the really shitty days and with luck a few cold beers, and so to bed, praying that the bells did not sound your way to the pit yet again.

God what a sentimental ****!!!!!
  #57  
Old 25th November 2010, 20:36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twogrumpy View Post
Strange how after all these years we remember the people who really hacked us off, and I mean really really hacked us off, not just those who we would not normally choose to socialise with, or those who were just mildly annoying.

Then you think back about the good guys, (not many galls in those days)the ones that made it all so worthwhile, the really shitty days and with luck a few cold beers, and so to bed, praying that the bells did not sound your way to the pit yet again.

God what a sentimental ****!!!!!
Well I never, the word tw*t is beyond the pale and has been censored, it certainly is a hard life in todays PC world.
  #58  
Old 29th November 2010, 15:02
stewart4866 stewart4866 is offline  
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Originally Posted by twogrumpy View Post
Well I never, the word tw*t is beyond the pale and has been censored, it certainly is a hard life in todays PC world.
Have another beer or two phill the day will look after it's self. How's life.
stewart
  #59  
Old 3rd December 2011, 02:28
taffrailmick taffrailmick is offline  
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Re 'Commodore', I had the great pleasure and privilege of sailing with Commodore Dick Higgins. Having been ashore in ship management now for more than 23 years and having recruited /managed / briefed more ship masters than I care to remember, he still remains the 'stand out' exemplar of what a Master / 'Commodore' (nominal or substantive rank) should be.
  #60  
Old 5th December 2011, 00:17
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I can sympathise with both sides re naming and shaming, though personally I think naming someone who is not going to retaliate is a bit ungentlemanly.
I'm sure most of us carry scars of some sort from our experiences at sea. I had a miserable first 6 month deepsea trip as Apprentice, treated like sh.t by the officers who, with hindsight, were pretty much a bunch of supercilious twats. I nearly jacked it in after 1 trip but somehow found the spirit to go back. My second trip was on the 'coast' and what a revelation, I found out what life at sea could really be like, and that second trip sustained me in later years when there were other tough spells.
I remember my first trip as uncert 3/O, I flew out to join ship at Mina al Ahmadi in the Gulf. Never even been on an aeroplane before! Flew out with the OM, a tottery old boy from W coast of Scotland. Again,with hindsight, he should never have been at sea in his physical condition, but hey things were different then.
Anyway, we sailed from Mina to Aden, navigating that coast was a challenge in those days especially for a newbie like me. Well we got to Aden and I took over the evening 8-12 for the final hour or so before arrival. The OM said he wanted to anchor 1 mile South (or whatever) of the Fairway Buoy. Yessir, says I, and I'm leaping up and down to the monkey island every 15 minutes taking bearings and plotting like a good'un. I see the Fairway buoy flashing away and get it on the old steam-driven radar, and pilot us into position and we drop anchor 1 mile South on the button. I'm really chuffed. We bring up and then I go up top to get the anchor bearings. When I plot it on the chart I find that we are considerably out of position and are in fact outside the port limit! The OM gave me a right mouthful cos I'd made the novice mistake of not checking the Fairway buoy was in the right place!
Well, for the rest of that 6 month trip, the OM never left me alone on the evening 8-12 again. He appeared in his shorts and vest as soon as the Mate had gone down, and he stayed till 2350hrs. We were crossing oceans with no sight of other ships for days on end but he never left me alone at night and it really screwed with my head at the time. He used to sit in the pilot chair and smoke some awful sh.te in his pipe called Irish Cake. I would disappear out to the bridgewing but every 10 minutes he'd call out in his wheedling broad Scottish accent (nothing against you Scots, by the way) "Are ye theyyyyyre, 3rd Mate? Can you see any ships?" Sheez, it drove me bleedin' crackers.
On the other side of the coin, a couple of trips later I sailed with an OM who used to come up to write his night orders and we'd have a chat which would develop into us telling each other a couple of jokes and we'd both be doubled up in stitches such that the watchman thought we were going to need 1st Aid!
On the whole I sailed with a few poor shipmates, the majority were fine, and a few were memorably great. Times were so different back then and when I went Master it was on a completely different type of vessel, but I tried to learn from the bad as well as the good and hopefully I made a decent fist of the job and will be remembered as one of the better Masters that my colleagues sailed with.
Ah well, I can dream, can't I?
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Last edited by tugboat; 5th December 2011 at 00:20..
  #61  
Old 17th April 2012, 09:18
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Tug boat .... that is a powerful posting. Epitomises everything we went through and it did not matter what company or part of the world ..I had similar experiences down here but the downs were few thank goodness most were goods and quite a few were wonderfull.
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  #62  
Old 17th April 2012, 12:01
stevekelly10 stevekelly10 is offline  
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Smile

I had the the pleasure of sailing on the respect as 3\E in 1979. Now not wishing to get involved in the debate on who was a good guy and who wasn't, here is a little tale of an event that happened onboard during the respect's drydocking at Lisbon Lisnave drydock, that will cheer up a certain group.
The ship was in the drydock which had just been pumped out. It was time for the senior staff to do a " bottom inspection" included in this group was the MD of BP tankers, a Mr Gresham if memory serves me right. If you had looked in the drydock at this time, you would have been dazzled by the reflections off the gold braid ! I had a walkie talkie and was tasked to open the ER sea valves when requested. Shortly after starting I was asked to open the aux condenser sea suction. I had just pressed the button when a frantic message came over the radio "close it, close it" ? It turned out the condenser hadn't been drained and the group in the drydock had been drenched in a large amount of dirty drydock water! Fortunately for me when the group returned onboard looking rather bedraggled. The MD saw the funny side, as I was struggling not to laugh and was nearlly doubled up don't think the others were too impressed tho
  #63  
Old 29th April 2012, 22:05
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twogrumpy View Post
Strange how after all these years we remember the people who really hacked us off, and I mean really really hacked us off, not just those who we would not normally choose to socialise with, or those who were just mildly annoying.

Then you think back about the good guys, (not many galls in those days)the ones that made it all so worthwhile, the really shitty days and with luck a few cold beers, and so to bed, praying that the bells did not sound your way to the pit yet again.

God what a sentimental ****!!!!!
I agree,

They say be carefull what you wish for. Well I had the misfortune to sail with a certain Captain (who shall remain nameless as he still lives and breathes as far as I know) and I allways said if there's one Captain I never ever want to sail with again it's him. A few year later and I get saddled with him again. I'm not questioning his ability to do his job, just his inability to handle men, and show total lack of warmth, respect, humanity, humility,consideration, compassion or understanding to others. I hesitate to use the words, commanded, supervised, etc etc. A more detached cold fish I've yet to come across.

But he was more than compensated for in the good ones I sailed with.
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  #64  
Old 4th September 2012, 22:50
Campbell47 Campbell47 is offline  
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I was also on that vessel as 4/e I also sailed with you on the British Vine.
  #65  
Old 28th January 2013, 18:37
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hi

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Originally Posted by gadgee View Post
During the course of my job today I was introduced to Captain(Commodore) Alan Davies who informed me that he retired from BP in about 1978. I never met nor heard of him during my 5 years with BP(66 - 71) but just in case anyone remembers him, he is in moderate health and lives in rural Northumberland. He was Commodore on British Respect at the 1977 Spithead Review. He is now 86 years old.
hello, i would just like to add, i know mr alan davies, he is 90 years old now, and one of the nicest men i have met, i find it very hard to believe what everyone has commented, i was not on alan's ship so cant comment, but what i can say is alan has always been very plesant with me, caring, and helpful, he is doing just great too for his age, he is an inspiration to many 8-)
  #66  
Old 28th January 2013, 19:45
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Hello 'somebody'... good that you have posted a comment and news of Mr Alan Davies. I wouldn't doubt your description of how he presents to you and thats fine.

However, how he presented to most of us who sailed with him in the close confines of the ship for extended periods, mine was 7 months on not very nice runs and in the days when recreation was limited to books,the weekly film and spasmodic mail from home. It was how he commanded life aboard and everyone, oblivious to his effect that caused the findings of the majority on this thread.
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  #67  
Old 29th January 2013, 11:00
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You make a good point Barnsey, people who shall we say are not the most comfortable to sail with can be quite reasonable human beings at home.

Of course we are supposed to mellow with age, or so I am reliably informed, frequently.

2G
  #68  
Old 29th January 2013, 12:25
oldseamerchant oldseamerchant is offline  
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Comments by people who have only entered the Masters cabin for coffee are not worth considering in this context. The Commodore should be allowed a peaceful retirement without adverse posts.
  #69  
Old 29th January 2013, 13:49
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Comments by people who have only entered the Masters cabin for coffee are not worth considering in this context. The Commodore should be allowed a peaceful retirement without adverse posts.
Yes, but a good deal more valid than those that have never known the person concerned in the working environment.

Also, unless you are suggesting a conspiracy, for similar comments to come from several people would indicate that the problem was quite serious and worthy of comment.

And as for only entering the masters cabin for coffee, well I did not see much of that in BP, possibly you know different, and your remark seems a triffle arrogant if I may say so.

2G

2G

Last edited by twogrumpy; 29th January 2013 at 14:34..
  #70  
Old 29th January 2013, 15:14
sparkie2182 sparkie2182 is offline  
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"Comments by people who have only entered the Masters cabin for coffee are NOT WORTH CONSIDERING in this context."

Clearly the view of the Master's in question.
  #71  
Old 29th January 2013, 15:36
oldseamerchant oldseamerchant is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twogrumpy View Post
Yes, but a good deal more valid than those that have never known the person concerned in the working environment.

Also, unless you are suggesting a conspiracy, for similar comments to come from several people would indicate that the problem was quite serious and worthy of comment.

And as for only entering the masters cabin for coffee, well I did not see much of that in BP, possibly you know different, and your remark seems a triffle arrogant if I may say so.

2G

2G
The man is retired leave him in peace.
There is an element amongst the membership (the Jimmy Saville brigade, etc) who love nothing more than to get personal. A very disturbing trait.
  #72  
Old 29th January 2013, 15:47
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Time to close the thread and move on, methinks..............
  #73  
Old 29th January 2013, 17:09
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Thanks Mako - I started it so will close it......
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