Siemens G11/G12 receivers - Ships Nostalgia
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Siemens G11/G12 receivers

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  #1  
Old 9th July 2009, 22:05
Robert Wheeler Robert Wheeler is offline  
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Siemens G11/G12 receivers

Who remembers the Siemens G11/G12 receiver combo.
I met these things in the early/mid seventies on my first trip by myself. The ship was old (1947 I think).
Switching off the MF set in order to switch on the HF was irritating enough but the lack of a bandspread on HF was a real pain. QRM seemed to be a way of life plus it drifted amazingly as the ship rolled.
As I'm sure others found, a book full of logging scale readings was a necessity specially when sent up to GK? to receive traffic.
But, there was something good about them - they certainly taught me to read morse through anything and honed my operating skills.
I've always wondered how old these receivers would have been. Anyone know when they first appeared?
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  #2  
Old 9th July 2009, 23:43
Hugh Wilson Hugh Wilson is offline  
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My very first ship, Khuzistan/GTBK, was fitted with these receivers and I know exactly what you mean. The book of logging scale numbers was kept in the top drawer, under the operating position desk and one of the first jobs I was given by the Chief R/O was to get a new note book and make a second copy. Drifting was horrendous. Things got even worse on my second ship Dunkyle/MXJZ with a Redifon R63 (or some similar number). I must say though that I learned a lot about how to be an R/O on these ships.
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  #3  
Old 10th July 2009, 19:33
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Hi Robert

I sailed with several, but the one on the Lokoja Palm/GWWJ was memorable because when I stood up to change from one to the other, you had to remember to check if you last used 16mhz on the SB186 HF TX - the tuning coil slug was full out if so and there was a great tendancy to crack your head on it !!

Nice photo of GWWJ in this months Ships Monthly

David
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  #4  
Old 13th July 2009, 16:32
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John Leary John Leary is offline
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Hi Robert

I came across the web site listed below some time ago quite by accident when I was looking for information on marine radio equipment. I did not
immediately make the connection between the receiver types and your posting. I hope the images bring back even more happy memories.

http://homepage.ntlworld.com/steven.whiting/G11_G12.htm

Best Regards

John
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  #5  
Old 14th July 2009, 11:33
freddythefrog freddythefrog is offline  
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Hyer Robert
I have a very vague recollection of these receivers from when at Riversdale Tech College, Liverpool 1965/67 era, could always tune in PPR from there which I though Rio from Liverpool wow!! could not wait to get away to sea.
Never did sail with them at all though.
Brings back memories. Nice pictures! cheers FTF
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  #6  
Old 16th July 2009, 20:26
Robert Wheeler Robert Wheeler is offline  
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Hi John
Well what can I say about those photos on the steven.whiting website! Many tks for the link. (my photos are are a bit less clear and I'd forgotten what they were like inside!)
33 years on from using them - bit of a memory rush there. Apart from the initial 'omg' reaction of seeing them for real all those years ago, the pics also brought sharp clear memories of a hot and sweaty shack and a definite need for h'phones to pick out the station I was waiting to work, often in a long queue for Portisheadradio.
Nostalgia, eh?
Tks again,
Robert

Last edited by Robert Wheeler; 16th July 2009 at 21:55..
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  #7  
Old 16th July 2009, 20:53
ChasD ChasD is offline
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Remember them all too well, as the standard 'Well paid to see the world' pose will testify. Worked for Seimens for several years - in me yoof !
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 7- Hyria - GSDP.jpg (103.0 KB, 196 views)

Last edited by ChasD; 16th July 2009 at 21:44.. Reason: Kant spel straight !
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  #8  
Old 20th July 2009, 21:15
Ynot Ynot is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChasD View Post
Remember them all too well, as the standard 'Well paid to see the world' pose will testify. Worked for Seimens for several years - in me yoof !

Chas Any chance you knew Woolwich techs Jamie, Steve, Dennis Hague, Tony Francis?
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  #9  
Old 20th July 2009, 21:37
Ynot Ynot is offline  
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Quote:
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Remember them all too well, as the standard 'Well paid to see the world' pose will testify. Worked for Seimens for several years - in me yoof !
Chas second question the TX in your pic I cannot place can you put a name to it
ynot
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  #10  
Old 22nd July 2009, 20:26
ChasD ChasD is offline
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Hi Ynot, Dennis Hague rings a bell, can't recall the others but then, it's back in the early jurassic period ! The TX alongside is the SB186X Hf Tx, you'll notice the black edge trim is missing LHS, as also was the side panel - this was the only way to keep the thing stable in pre-A/C China Sea temperatures and humidity. David (above) refers, but that was - I think - the consol mounted variety. The M/F R/T T/X was the usual T10A. Them wuz the days of real radio ! More pics in the radio section of Gallery - back a ways ....

Best 73's Chas
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  #11  
Old 23rd July 2009, 19:20
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Chas

On GWWJ the SB186 was a pale sort of green/grey colour and it was free standing. I see the coil slug just above your head in your thumbnail !!

In later years, I came across Ron Champion. When talking about the T10A his comment was 'Now there was a designed Tx' As you suggest - a workhorse.

David
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  #12  
Old 23rd July 2009, 20:48
ChasD ChasD is offline
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Yep, that was the abiding impression one got of that stuff, basic, but solid and reliable. Can't ever remember doing any real fault finding on the stuff - push the buttons and it just went ! Stability wasn't great but you got used to that !
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  #13  
Old 24th July 2009, 14:22
Ynot Ynot is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChasD View Post
Hi Ynot, Dennis Hague rings a bell, can't recall the others but then, it's back in the early jurassic period ! The TX alongside is the SB186X Hf Tx, you'll notice the black edge trim is missing LHS, as also was the side panel - this was the only way to keep the thing stable in pre-A/C China Sea temperatures and humidity. David (above) refers, but that was - I think - the consol mounted variety. The M/F R/T T/X was the usual T10A. Them wuz the days of real radio ! More pics in the radio section of Gallery - back a ways ....

Best 73's Chas
Yes I am really going back I wonder how many of us are left.
Thought 186. It did perform really well if you had the nack of tuning it properly and manage to get more than 5o watts up the spout. Not much of a problem for us dinosaurs as we had the area system going for HF.

Nice chatting to you

cheers
ynot
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  #14  
Old 28th July 2009, 17:00
Shipbuilder Shipbuilder is offline
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I was with the G11 G12 receivers from 1959 to 1965 and as I didn't know any better at the time, I never gave them a thought. Neither do I recall any of them breaking down! I trained on them at Wray Castle and they were fantastic for training with their permanent monitoring system. I loved the look of the red EF39s, ECH35, EBC33 and the lonely 6V6 output one deck above with the flickering stabilisers. 90 Khz IF as well. When I arrived aboard the ancient RICHMOND CASTLE in 1965, I was delighted with the Marconi Mercury and found it a great improvement on the G11 G12.
I sailed with the SB186X as well on FREDERICK T. EVERARD and although it was a bit primitive, it worked OK and never broke down.
Bob
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  #15  
Old 18th August 2009, 14:26
Graham P Powell Graham P Powell is offline  
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I remember the G11 and G12. You switched over the power supply and turned the tuning dial whilst trying to copy something down. Never broke down though. The logging scale book was an essential. On RML ships the HF and MF receivers were separate and you did not have to switch over the power. They also had two 600 watt main transmitters with single knob tuning if my memory is right. The chief and 2/R/O actually repaired the power supply for one of those by dismantling a transformer, unwinding it, fixing the break and putting it back together. They were R/O's of the old school....
rgds Graham Powell
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  #16  
Old 20th August 2009, 07:25
GBXZ GBXZ is offline  
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Siemens Receivers

They were installed in the radio cabins at Riversdale in 1965, great for fault finding. Don't worry said the lecturers you will never see these when you go to sea. Two years later I joined the Hudson Deep on the Tasman run and she had one. No problems with comms as I used MF all the way between Auckland and Bundaberg.

Richard
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  #17  
Old 31st July 2012, 20:46
sharp ear sharp ear is offline  
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Siemens G12 help needed for restoration project

Have just aquired a G12 without PSU and AF decks. Can any old salts point me in the right direction for some information to get the old girl going ? Perhaps they were in one of the Technical notes books.
If I can get details of the Jones plug connections, and power requirements, that should be enough. I have only seen another one of these ever. Fortunately it seems complete with all valves.
I know it will be second rate compared to my Marconi Atalanta, but theres just something about it !
Many Thanks, Keith



Quote:
Originally Posted by GBXZ View Post
They were installed in the radio cabins at Riversdale in 1965, great for fault finding. Don't worry said the lecturers you will never see these when you go to sea. Two years later I joined the Hudson Deep on the Tasman run and she had one. No problems with comms as I used MF all the way between Auckland and Bundaberg.

Richard
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  #18  
Old 1st August 2012, 08:46
Graham P Powell Graham P Powell is offline  
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"You will never see one of these when you get to sea" was a favourite comment
by College lecturers. We had a Marconi Seaspan at Bristol tech. Like an O'span
but using miniature valves. It had miniature power output at 80 watts as well.
Sure enough I found one on a BP tanker. regards
Graham Powell
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  #19  
Old 3rd August 2012, 10:05
Robert M Hughes Robert M Hughes is offline  
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G11 & G12 - Advanced technology from some of the previous equipment I encountered with Siemens - one hand on the tuning knob the other on the key what's the problem. Actually despite drift they were reliable - I never experienced any breakdowns.
Bob
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  #20  
Old 3rd August 2012, 20:52
Graham P Powell Graham P Powell is offline  
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Hi Bob, Although I worked for Marconi I was mainly on AEI ships and I found
their gear to be very reliable. I can remember tuning with one hand and keying with the other as the receiver drifted as it warmed up just like the chap in the picture. With Royal Mail we had 600 watt tx's. One for HF and one for MF.
Single knob tuning. I was told by GKA operators that although they were powerful
they didn't seem to produce a very "punchy" signal.
regards
Graham Powell
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  #21  
Old 5th August 2012, 21:44
sparks69 sparks69 is online now  
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For SeaSpan read PondSpan
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  #22  
Old 6th August 2012, 08:10
Graham P Powell Graham P Powell is offline  
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Not only was it puny in output, it also gave a lot of trouble as well. Terrible thing. The story was that the one at college had been donated by the Marconi
Co as they hadn't sold many. I wonder why!.
rgds
Graham Powell
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  #23  
Old 6th August 2012, 10:41
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Varley Varley is offline   SN Supporter
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What was the PuddleSpan then?
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  #24  
Old 6th August 2012, 14:56
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Ron Stringer Ron Stringer is online now
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Seaspan was well before my time but I thought that it was a derivative of the Oceanspan intended for use on fishing vessels. In those days we had a massive fishing fleet, including a significant distant-water fishing fleet. I don't know whether it was R/T-only, HF-only or what. Can anyone enlighten me?
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  #25  
Old 7th August 2012, 09:21
Graham P Powell Graham P Powell is offline  
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Hi Ron,
The Seaspan was HF W/T only using miniature valves as opposed to 807's etc.
It could well have been designed to go on trawlers. O/P power was about 80 Watts. The BP tanker I was on had an enormous main aerial system and I worked GKA from W. Oz with it. The main transitter was a Reliance and it
had CR150 and Atalanta receivers. The CR150 was the emergency one and it
came in very useful at times. Oh for ship with decent gear....
rgds
Graham Powell
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