BP Marine Engineering Apprenticeship changes 1952 onwards - Ships Nostalgia
08:31

Welcome
Welcome!Welcome to Ships Nostalgia, the world's greatest online community for people worldwide with an interest in ships and shipping. Whether you are crew, ex-crew, ship enthusiasts or cruisers, this is the forum for you. And what's more, it's completely FREE.

Click here to go to the forums home page and find out more.
Click here to join.
Log in
User Name Password

BP Marine Engineering Apprenticeship changes 1952 onwards

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 20th October 2014, 23:37
Graham Wallace Graham Wallace is offline  
Senior Member
Department: Engineering
Active: 1955 - 1962
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 1,457
BP Marine Engineering Apprenticeship changes 1952 onwards

BP Marine Engineering Apprenticeship changes 1952 to present.

BP’s Marine Engineering Apprenticeship has changed a lot since its inception in 1951/52, I would like to find out what these changes were, and can any old guys help?

When I started my Marine Engineering Apprenticeship in 1955 with The British Tanker Company/ Anglo Iranian Oil Co the apprenticeship was in its 4th Year, the first year being the 1952 intake commencing September 1952. Well in actual fact that is not quite correct, there were three Marine Engineering Apprentices inducted in 1951 as pilot scheme; MF Johnson, LJ Powell and DR Pulman as far as I know only MF Johnson stayed on with BPTC to at least 1960 with the rank of 3E.

The programme was designed by a number of major shipping companies and the British MOT such that at the end of your 54 months you were a (semi) proficient Marine Engineer, of Junior Engineer rank. The programme was called, ‘The alternative scheme for Marine Engineering Apprentices’ and consisted of 4 Phases. Prior to that time there were no Apprentices/Cadets or Engineering Officers at sea with BP younger than 21, all Engine room staff had completed a recognised Heavy Engineering Apprenticeship within the Marine Profession ( Ship Building yard, Repair Yard ,Dock Yard, Engine/Pump Manufacturers etc.) or had transferred over from another shipping Company . In some cases an engineering apprenticeship with another shore side company would be recognised and sail as JE’s with certain conditions.

I presume the organising Companies had decided that after the war with all the new ship building a more academic education specifically for Seagoing Engineers was required and their efforts resulted in a four phase apprenticeship. It started with a two year full time Ordinary National Diploma course, known as Phases I&II. No college vacation times were wasted, EA’s were sent off during the vacation period to marine engineering companies throughout UK. Phase III would also be one year of heavy engineering in one of the accepted industry sources previously mentioned. Phase IV the then last was 18 months as a Marine Engineering Apprentice aboard both Motor and Steam ships in the company’s Fleet. If at sea on the day your Apprenticeship finished you were immediately promoted Junior Engineer.

My personal OND certificate was unusual (I think) in as much as it was written up as an “Ordinary National Diploma in "Mechanical and Marine Engineering”. In my case very useful in later life going on to further education, eventual MI MECH, C.Eng and Canadian P.Eng.

In my time it was accepted that sea service prior to sitting a Second Class MOT certificate was 15 months and also 15 months for Chief Engineer’s Certificate. I cannot remember precisely but shore trained personnel had increased times of 18/24 months for both Certificates. Ex apprentices could achieve both certificates at a very young age, a BP serving CE around 28 was the youngest I heard of.

Unfortunately for me in my second year BTC changed to the BP Tanker Company/ BP Oil Co and for some reason my apprenticeship was changed, Phases I & II (OND) course remained the same but Phases III & IV were reversed, delaying my sea service time by one year. I completed my year of heavy engineering and then went to sea as an EA, promoted to JE on the completion date of my Apprenticeship. At the time I did not know the real reason for this change but what was certain was that all 105 of the 1955 intake were sent to complete the one year shore engineering in “BP UK refineries”.

I still do not know the precise rational for this change, the rumour was that too many EA’s in the 4 previous years played hooky from their Dockyard and shipbuilding companies and took part time casual work for local councils, therefore totally absent when visiting Apprenticeship supervisors visited. Whatever the official reason I felt cheated; I felt it diminished the quality of my personal instruction.

Thank goodness BP seemingly came to their senses for the Refinery phase only lasted for a few years, until around 1957 (there are some who enjoyed and valued it, but not me.)

Some (12) 1956 Apprentices in their fourth year were sent on an A2 Higher Technical Studies (HNC /HND?) at Hendon Technical College, that was repeated for eleven 1957 Apprentices but I do not know whether that scheme continued of through later years. Also at some time in later years there were two Phases I and II, one for OND and One for ONC, when did that start and how long did it last and why?

The Phase IV changed a number of times later, now I am not precisely certain that what I am saying is correct as unfortunately I have never asked the specific question to later intakes. However there was a change back to some large Marine Engineering establishments for 6 months and a further 6 months at South Shields Marine and Technical College (SSM&TC). What course of instruction did they receive there? Even later the change was to 6 months SSM&TC and 6 months at sea, what happened to the remaining 18 months? But then arrived the rank of AJE (Assistant Junior Engineer), was that a cheap way of filling more expensive Junior Engineer positions, or were those personnel just not available? Those were a few of the changes that I heard about, however I presumed their Apprenticeship time was still 54 months?

I first came across Don Bootle in 2003 and he gave me a write up of his time with BP which commenced as a Junior Engineer in 1952. He gained a 2nd class certificate and was promoted to Second Engineer without ever sailing a 4E or 3E (that would raise a few eyebrows!). He was recruited in 1957 by Dan Alcock in November 1957 eventually working with Messrs Young and Webb (I remember him). Then appointed Training Officer for Engineer Officer training (?) and development and restructuring of the training programme which evidently took place within BP and Nationally.

Quote,” Although working with Dan Alcock I was very much involved with the restructuring of the training programme, from the early days of how you did it to all the eventual changes that took place not only in BP but Nationally. Whilst in the BP job I was also used as Technical Advisor to the Heavy Marine Training Centres established at all major marine colleges throughout the UK. All of these were mainly equipped with pumps, motors and other machinery and equipment taken from BP tankers sold for scrap. An interesting time!”

A further quote from him to me was, “I suspect that apart from your group (I presume he meant 1955 intake) I had an involvement with every engineer cadet recruited by BP”

I know that in my time I had no knowledge of Don, unfortunately Don died suddenly in early 2009 (I wrote a Shipsnostalgia thread at that time)and prior to that I really did not have the interest in the restructuring of the Marine Engineering Apprenticeship that I have now, so never tried to clarify it with him.

Class of Tickets have vastly changed, I think I have that information tucked away somewhere, the dinosaurs such as I only had 2E & CE (and extra Chief’s if one could handle that)

There are still EC’s at sea in BP ships I wonder whether things have academically changed?

I picked up some notes from an article in a 1984 Fleet News.

Article in Fleet News May 1984, Deck, Engineer and Radio cadets stoppage , the last cadets were in 1981/Electronic Cadetships will be restarted after a 2 year stoppage, the last cadets were in 1981.

Cadetship recommencing 1984 will be a newly developed 3 year duration ( FN 11/84 article, 43 new Engineering Cadet recruits)


Oh, how the mighty have fallen, now a 3 year Cadetship!

So I would be interested to hear from later Engineering Apprentices and Cadets (March 1966) how their programme worked and the various phases. Add some postings to this thread and possibly send me a personal email.

I would like to eventually document all these changes and revisions in an understandable format. It was my time and your time.

Graham
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 21st October 2014, 02:22
ChiefCharles's Avatar
ChiefCharles ChiefCharles is offline  
Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1956 - 2005
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 75
Graham: Unlike yourself I much preferred doing the Third Year in Llandarcy Refinery prior to starting the final phase at sea. Your reference to AJE(Assistant Junior Engineer) I have never heard off. On the British Light on the 22nd. December 1960 I was promoted and signed on as Acting Jnr. Eng. with full Junior Engineer Pay. This stayed in effect until the 17th. March when I was officially promoted to Junior Eng. The reason for the Acting Jun. Eng. promotion was a lack of Junior Engineers. Very much enjoyed your post. - Roger
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 21st October 2014, 04:50
Graham Wallace Graham Wallace is offline  
Senior Member
Department: Engineering
Active: 1955 - 1962
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 1,457
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChiefCharles View Post
Graham: Unlike yourself I much preferred doing the Third Year in Llandarcy Refinery prior to starting the final phase at sea. Your reference to AJE(Assistant Junior Engineer) I have never heard off. On the British Light on the 22nd. December 1960 I was promoted and signed on as Acting Jnr. Eng. with full Junior Engineers pay. This stayed in effect until the 17th. March when I was officially promoted to Junior Eng. The reason for the Acting Jun. Eng. promotion was a lack of Junior Engineers.( I thought it might be that) Very much enjoyed your post. - Roger
Roger,

My mistake (again)there, I meant Acting Junior Engineer. I believe that AJE ranking was not kept for many years though. However there were also Engineer(ing?)/Assistants (eg Fern March 1972), Ass /Eng (Hero March 1972) and a few other like titles , some modern ones are real doozies, I contacted one ex EC C/E (19 years older than us) to see if he could explain them to me, he declined, too confusing...

And you a 1956 entrant signed on in 1960 as a "Cadet" as well !, I can't win!

Pray tell me what you liked about the refinery training, home town bias ?(only joking). I'll dig out my 12 month schule for my 'time' at Isle of Grain. So that's now two of you I know who liked the refinery training.....I need help here !
Or do you mean having that year as further engineering before the sea phase? One of the delights for me starting in 1955 was the thought of going to sea immediately after the OND and then going to a yard for the last year to really see how they were all made, or an engine plant.

To reverse that was quite a shock, and to cap that, I bet you would never guess where about 20 of my year spent their vacation training 2 months at end of OND. Wandering around the new non-completed workshops at the Westoe site of SSM&TC, turning test pieces for their Izod testing machines! sadly pathetic!....'they' could have done vastly better than that!

Hey, I only made 4E, a Steam ticket and walked, I'm very low on the totem pole.

Graham
PS. Ta for your SN PM , I'll use it.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 21st October 2014, 09:49
DAVELECKIE DAVELECKIE is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 702
Graham, I believe the Eng assistants you mention were introduced with the advent of GP manning in the early 70,s. They were recruited from the crew from what I remember and this never became an officer rank for want of a better word.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 21st October 2014, 10:36
Duncan112's Avatar
Duncan112 Duncan112 is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1981 - 2003
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
My location
Posts: 3,457
Hi Graham,

I joined BP in 1981, did 2 years at college (Greenhithe - they also used S. Shields, Warsash & Glasgow) finish with an OND 5 months at sea, 1 year at college (S Shields, Poplar having closed) Convert to HND then another 5 months at sea followed by redundancy. All Cadets were offered the chance of a trip as Junior then redundancy (The payout was the same overall - your statutory redundancy was in effect enhanced by the value of a 3 month trip) I had the offer of a job with Bank Line so a bird in the hand and all that - took the money.

There was also a degree cadetship on offer then at Southampton or Plymouth (can't remember) same shore/sea profile but finish with a BSc.

Some Engineer Assistants were Electricians - it was a way of getting sea time if they wanted to do a ticket - John Hambling came up that way.
__________________
“Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”

George Santayana (1863 - 1952)
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 21st October 2014, 10:37
twogrumpy's Avatar
twogrumpy twogrumpy is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1968 - 1986
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 1,944
Quote:
Originally Posted by DAVELECKIE View Post
Graham, I believe the Eng assistants you mention were introduced with the advent of GP manning in the early 70,s. They were recruited from the crew from what I remember and this never became an officer rank for want of a better word.
Believe I recall the term Eng assistants, one that did not linger very long, possibly no bad thing.
__________________
The greatest cross I have to bear is the cross of Lorraine.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 21st October 2014, 12:29
DaveM399 DaveM399 is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1971 - 1986
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 204
Graham, I was a 1971 intake, and started off with 2 years doing the OND Marine Engineering course at Poplar Tech. Then it was a first trip at sea, just under 6 months. Phase 3 (OND endorsement or supplementary study I think it was called) was at Glasgow, starting in February 1974 through to December 1974, so we were out of phase with the college's academic year.
Last part of the cadetship was a 5 month trip as acting J/E, but signed on as an E/C. This was typical for most of the lads I knew from this intake.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 22nd October 2014, 16:54
offcumdum sanddancer's Avatar
offcumdum sanddancer offcumdum sanddancer is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
My location
Posts: 221
Graham,
I think that the one of the reasons that the original intended phases 3 and 4 of the apprenticeship training scheme were reversed was because it was becoming difficult to appoint all the apprentices to ships all at one time, and more importantly, to get them back to a UK technical college to start phase 4. Over the 1950's, the trading patterns of ships changed, and instead of returning to the UK for drydock every year, they went elsewhere. Also some ships would stay out East for long periods, and may have drydocked there also. Articles were for 2 years even when I went to sea, even though it would be unusual to stay out for 2 years. Also, there were no reliefs by air until about 1968.

I was an ONC intake of 1963, and there was an ONC intake in parallel with the OND in 1962 also. I don't know when it started though. I would think that it was started for the same reason that the apprenticeship scheme itself had started, there were not enough engineers coming to sea, and not enough staying as the fleet was rapidly expanding. Also the training of engineers was in the shipping companies hands, and could be shaped to what they wanted. And also that was part of the reason for starting reliefs by air, and the much improved food in the late 1960's. Retention of warm bodies for ships.

I was in recruitment dept. for a year in 1979/1980 so some of this may have been learned then?
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 22nd October 2014, 18:04
Graham Wallace Graham Wallace is offline  
Senior Member
Department: Engineering
Active: 1955 - 1962
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 1,457
Now I'm getting confused with the terms ONC and OND, I always considered a 'C' course part time with a few subjects and "D' full time with more subjects

In my time 1952/55 OND we took 7 full time subjects for the two years and at the end of second year had to pass the 4 majors and I think 2 out of 3 minors to walk away with a Diploma. Fail just one of the 4 majors and you walked away with nothing.

When I took an HNC after leaving BP and the sea, it was 3 subjects for three nights a week for two years and the three Non technical subject for the other 2 years at nights. The result was HNC with Endorsements

So what was the difference between ONC and OND with BP?

Graham
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 22nd October 2014, 19:21
Graham Wallace Graham Wallace is offline  
Senior Member
Department: Engineering
Active: 1955 - 1962
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 1,457
Quote:
Originally Posted by Graham Wallace View Post
Now I'm getting confused with the terms ONC and OND, I always considered a 'C' course part time with a few subjects and "D' full time with more subjects

In my time 1952/55 OND we took 7 full time subjects for the two years and at the end of second year had to pass the 4 majors and I think 2 out of 3 minors to walk away with a Diploma. Fail just one of the 4 majors and you walked away with nothing.

When I took an HNC after leaving BP and the sea, it was 3 subjects for three nights a week for two years and the three Non technical subject for the other 2 years at nights. The result was HNC with Endorsements

So what was the difference between ONC and OND with BP?

Graham
I could not quite come to terms with the end of my second paragraph so dug around in my old files and came up with day release courses whilst at Isle of Grain for that one year.

They were held at Medway College of Technology, the guys that failed the OND took an ONC course so preumably did end up with an ONC.

The remainder took three Endorsement courses, Electrical Engineerig, Marine Power Plant and Naval Architecture.

Graham
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 22nd October 2014, 19:34
offcumdum sanddancer's Avatar
offcumdum sanddancer offcumdum sanddancer is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
My location
Posts: 221
When I started the ONC course it was full time for 2 years at Bolton college, with workshop training at Bolton college in summer 1964. At the end of college year I was sent to Wallsend Slipway for the college holidays, and then started a further course at South Shields, a mix of workshop and classroom work. The ONC was normally taken at the end of that college year before starting at sea in 1966. The subjects were the same as the OND but a different sylabus -read easier. This was not easy enough for me as I dropped off that course and did the 2nd's part 'A' directly. In my case I carried on doing tickets as I found that I liked the job. In fact I carried on studying until I stopped with a BSc in Design and Systems Analysis.

So, why was there an ONC course? Mostly the lads who went on it were lacking in getting all the entry requirements for the OND, for many different reasons (did the wrong subjects, had crap teachers etc.), but were suitable for service at sea in all other respects.

Keith Perriman
Still in South Shields
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 11th May 2018, 16:19
mainley mainley is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 4
Just found this site and revelling in nostalgia - everythings great looking back 50 years!
I did an engineering cadetship with BP from 1965 on.
2 years doing OND at Swansea College of Technology, 6months at South Shields for OND endorsements, 6 months at Hawthornes Engine works at St Peters (Tyneside) then 18 months at sea.
I joined British Sovereign 11/9/68 in dry dock at Harland and Wollf (Belfast) - what shock to the system!(Nothing to do with the ship - just my inexperience!).

British Crusader- joined 15/4/69 in Skaramanga (Where the hells that?).

British Gull - joined 23/12/69 in Durban (Heartless bastards dragging a young bloke from his girl 2 days before Christmas).Was promoted to Junior Eng 13/3/70.

British Flag - joined 27/8/1970 as 4th/E at Falmouth D/D. Accompanied by my brand new wife Barbara. The ship was in collision in fog first day out from Falmouth - we ended up spending another 2-3 weeks in Bremerhaven getting patched up.
6 months on the Flag rounded off my seafaring days. Barb and I came to Perth, Western Australia in 1971 and have happily lived here since. I've had many occasions over the years to be grateful for the early training given by the cadet scheme even though my sea time was brief.
Mike Ainley
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 11th May 2018, 19:03
Graham Wallace Graham Wallace is offline  
Senior Member
Department: Engineering
Active: 1955 - 1962
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 1,457
Quote:
Originally Posted by mainley View Post
Just found this site and revelling in nostalgia - everythings great looking back 50 years!
I did an engineering cadetship with BP from 1965 on.
2 years doing OND at Swansea College of Technology, 6months at South Shields for OND endorsements, 6 months at Hawthornes Engine works at St Peters (Tyneside) then 18 months at sea.
I joined British Sovereign 11/9/68 in dry dock at Harland and Wollf (Belfast) - what shock to the system!(Nothing to do with the ship - just my inexperience!).

British Crusader- joined 15/4/69 in Skaramanga (Where the hells that?).

British Gull - joined 23/12/69 in Durban (Heartless bastards dragging a young bloke from his girl 2 days before Christmas).Was promoted to Junior Eng 13/3/70.

British Flag - joined 27/8/1970 as 4th/E at Falmouth D/D. Accompanied by my brand new wife Barbara. The ship was in collision in fog first day out from Falmouth - we ended up spending another 2-3 weeks in Bremerhaven getting patched up.
6 months on the Flag rounded off my seafaring days. Barb and I came to Perth, Western Australia in 1971 and have happily lived here since. I've had many occasions over the years to be grateful for the early training given by the cadet scheme even though my sea time was brief.
Mike Ainley
Hi Mike,

So another one has surfaced, I know 3 other of your fellow EA's at Swansea, Peter Benger ,Peter Doughty and Allan Mackenzie, any memories?
John Sutton (ex 53EA was your Chief on the Flag), unfortunately he passed away a few years ago of Mesothelioma. You were relieved by Stephen Scaith ( not an ex EA) around Feb 1971.

I see you sailed on my favourite ship as first trip EA, many memories.

You are not alone in Perth, I know at least one other ex 1965 living there then moved slightly south when retired.

I'll send you a ships nostalgia email.

Graham
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 12th May 2018, 15:55
mainley mainley is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 4
Hi Graham
Yes I do remember these guys from Swansea OND time.
Bit confusing but I was known as Mike Hignett at Swansea- took my step dads name, Ainley, before I went to South Shields. Memories a bit fuzzy regarding others - but Paul Schofield from Belfast was a good mate. Also there were 2 welsh lads Paul and Phil and Mike Hilton from Poole. We shared the course with some great lads from other companies - Neil Spiller (Caltex), Neil Cameron and others fromHoulders and I think Dave Smith (Reardons).
You mention the Soveriegn- I don't remember too much of the trip but a couple of years ago we holidayed in the Cinque Terra in Italy and realised these were the hillside villages we had sailed past on the last day aboard before paying off in La Spezia - the joy of knowing you're going to be on the plane home within hours - got our introduction to compulsory renditions of Bye Bye BP!
Regarding the Br Flag and its collision - I had an earlier experience with ship.
My digs were high on Mt Pleasant overlooking the coast and I actually heard the explosion which occurred on board the Flag when she was in Queens Dock - must have been 1966-67 and don't recall cause but I think a deckhand was killed
Regards
Mike Ainley
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 13th May 2018, 20:38
david freeman david freeman is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,037
BPTC Alternative scheme.
HI graham david freeman here 1959 to 1964 apprentice eng cadet, Alcock in charge Bootle kicked ****.
My time 2 years OND mechanical endorsed Marine 59-61 Middlesborough [ this at a pass level gave one exemption from 2/e and c/e certificate Part A examinations [seatime 18 months- for each ticket}. summer 60. 7 weeks at BTH Rugby apprenticeships workshop.
61 July to end of dec 61 Ship yard Palmers Hebburn [Tyne] here one was appointed as an assistant dogs body for a fitter- the problem was that due to employment and the seasonal staus of the dockyard fitters, one was not encouraged to be an active fitters mate, except for bring me carry me, and do not make it obvious you were a spare part-I never worked with a fitter on main boilers/scotch boilers/main and auxiliary diesel engines or main turbines? I could watch, but not while the foreman was about. Job protection for each fitter was paramount, as was his cup of tea from the canteen. I went sent to bing me/carry me task, I would disappear into the being completed new drydock pumproom, and watched and learnt from my digs compatriots who were electrical engineers and fitter cable/wiring learning electrics and the different wiring used in the pump room.
Now the short change bit of my I believe promised training.
jan 62 to july62, this was the alternative scheme, and intensive training at South Shields Marine Tech both academic and practical for Part B of the 2/e and c/e certificates. Here I was lead at the time to believe this would be considered and granted if one passed the course at a credit level as a pass/exemption from Part B of the 2/e and c/e certificates,[ except for the orals] as was the case for the full apprenticeship training scheme operated by other shipping companies-- The disadvantage for this scheme full scheme was that after the final sea time, and the completion of the apprenticeship, was the high number of resignations from the subject shipping company.[unlike BP one was maybe at sea and either became a company MAN OR A NON ESTABLISHED MN industry employee and could sign off at break of articles, from the company and that ship.
The third phase BP -mine - july 62 to 63 summer depended upon leave- to complete the actual seatime of 18 months.
During the latter days of this sea time there were personally two main objectives, 1 being offered a company contract as an employee and an invite to join the companies non contributory pension fund [10 years minimum for a payment of a promised pension].
Personally I wished the company contract and pay, and the ability to do sea time on articles even in port- ticket time was or could be completed in a shorter time than a liner or tramp company, and still be relieved after 6-8 months per voyage.
My sea time I think was 15 months for my tickets. I was lucky and appointed to steam ships after my apprenticeship time, which I preferred giving me only the requirement to complete a 6 month motor c/e endorsement.
I meet on my way through my apprenticeship cadets who were given different schemes.
1/- HNC apprenticeship, with exemptions from Part A and part B except for the orals from the 2/e and c/e tickets. the persons I meet completed there course at either Hendon or Gateshead college.
2/- If one failed the OND course, but had attained at a reasonable academic level compared direct with a 2/e Part A certificate of competency, then this exemption was granted? 2/e ticket only.
3/- If one was unlucky and ploughed the academic attributes then one sat and took the normal Part a and part B tickets for both 2/e and c/e with a 18 months sea time.
One had to cope when sailing in the fleet with sea time for the nominated motor or steam ticket was tricky when trying to book leave appropriate leave for taking ones ticket.

Last edited by david freeman; 14th May 2018 at 08:51..
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Marine Engineering Lecturers Remembered.... makko The Engine Room 142 8th January 2020 14:59
1952 Engineering Apprentices GeoffreyBH BP Shipping 13 13th April 2016 19:31
Bob Hodgson 1958 BP Marine Engineering Apprentice Graham Wallace BP Shipping 11 14th September 2015 16:47
Marine Engineering Book Macphail Bank Line 8 10th April 2012 21:42
Modern Marine Engineering briant The Engine Room 66 30th April 2009 14:21



Support SN


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.1.0 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.