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William Doxford and Sons

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  #26  
Old 30th March 2013, 12:31
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averheijden averheijden is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ben27 View Post
hi averheijden.26th.september2012 19:37.re:william doxford and son.i am not an engineer,but the tread is most interesting,your clip on doxfords repairs is very comprehensive visualy to a non eng,thank you for your post. have a good day,ben27
Hi ben 27,

DOXFORD WAS AND IS STILL INTERESTING

Have a nice Easter
Alfons
http://users.telenet.be/doxford-matters
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  #27  
Old 30th March 2013, 12:52
Malky Glaister Malky Glaister is offline  
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Hi Alfons,

The clearance quoted of 0.00153" is a tad minute! Fitting a whitemetal bearing to this would be nigh on impossible and running hot would be a likely event.
Even the expert fitters in Sunderland would have extreme difficulties getting anywhere near it, 15 tenths!

More likely the clearance would be 0.0153" but this is perhaps a bit fine also.

regards

Malky
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  #28  
Old 30th March 2013, 21:04
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Originally Posted by Malky Glaister View Post
Hi Alfons,

The clearance quoted of 0.00153" is a tad minute! Fitting a whitemetal bearing to this would be nigh on impossible and running hot would be a likely event.
Even the expert fitters in Sunderland would have extreme difficulties getting anywhere near it, 15 tenths!

More likely the clearance would be 0.0153" but this is perhaps a bit fine also.

regards
Malky

Malky,
As I said before, I have no any practical experience with the "P" or "J" Type, only with LB's

But I've read in a paper “DOXFORD ENGINES, to the Canadian Division of the Institute of Marine Engineers", October 1975 the following:

The most vulnerable bearing in a slow speed 2-stroke engine is the centre crosshead bearing which has to withstand heavy loads and has neither reversal of load nor a continuous rubbing movement to promote an oil film.

The “J-Engine” inherited the pad and bearing type of crosshead shown in Fig. 6a
In this bearing under the light load, which occurs for three-quarters of the cycle, the pad had a clearance of about two- thousandth of an inch (0,002”=0,05 mm).
This was taken up by deflection of the components under firing pressure enabling the pad to take its fair share of the firing load

When correctly set this bearing gave excellent results but it was difficult to adjust and to maintain in correct adjustment.

The later design in Fig. 6b has a full width bottom half bearing which is much easier to set up
To give ideal load distribution the pin is ground about four-tenths of a thousandth of an inch (0,004” = 0,1 mm) smaller in diameter in the middle than at the ends to compensate for deflection under load.
The pins are nitride hardened to about 950DPN to give long life with negligible wear

Till so far this paper

Regards
Alfons
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File Type: jpg Crosshead Bearings J-Types.jpg (35.3 KB, 26 views)

Last edited by averheijden; 31st March 2013 at 11:45.. Reason: Name correction
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  #29  
Old 31st March 2013, 01:08
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hi averheijden,sm.yesterday.21:31.re:doxford eng,another great clip for a non engineer to view, thanks again,enjoy easter.ben21
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  #30  
Old 31st March 2013, 11:37
Malky Glaister Malky Glaister is offline  
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Alfonso,
I have no experience of P & J types either and as you some LB.
I cannot argue with what is written down either in the paper presentation nor the design criteria.
I agree that crosshead bearings have always been the most difficult to lubricate with many and varied solutions. The lifting system on the Fiat GMT superbores for example and high pressure lub system used elsewhere to lift the entire weight off the bearing at the lower end of the stroke. To do this one must have clearance so that an oil film can be present.
It seems to me that Doxfords were by then clutching at straws to no effect.
The Seahorse project came too late. Now I would have loved to see that running.

Regards

Malky
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  #31  
Old 1st April 2013, 10:23
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Alfonso,
Now I would have loved to see that running.
Regards
Malky
Malky
Here you see some DOXFORD's in running condition, also the SEAHORSE

Regards
ALFONS
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  #32  
Old 1st April 2013, 10:44
Malky Glaister Malky Glaister is offline  
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Thanks Affons. I had seen this before.

I enjoyed my time on Doxfords, 3 LBs in fact. Two four cylinders and one three legged engine.

I do feel that the engine was not really capable of the high power outputs required in the seventies and development ceased.
I seem to recall big problems with the distance between the main bearings being too great for reliable operation of the crosshead bearing firing loads. There was much discussion but it died off as did the engine.
I also sailed on a good few Gotaverkens and one Mitsubishi. All with side rods driving exhaust valves and I think a piston on the Mitsubishi (I may well be incorrect). Some Gotaverkens driven from the crankshaft, but on cams and not supplying any torque to the shaft. Not sure about the Mitsubishi.

Glad to be out of the business never the less!!

regards

Malky
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  #33  
Old 1st April 2013, 17:49
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Originally Posted by Malky Glaister View Post
Thanks Alfons. I had seen this before.

I enjoyed my time on Doxfords
I seem to recall big problems with the distance between the main bearings being too great for reliable operation of the crosshead bearing firing loads.
Glad to be out of the business never the less!!
regards
Malky
L.S.

There’s a crack in my crankshaft, dear William, dear William
There’s a crack in my crankshaft, dear William, a CRACK
Then fix it, dear Owner, dear Owner, dear Owner
Then fix it, dear Owner, dear Owner, fix it!.
With what shall I fix it, dear William, dear William?
With what shall I fix it, dear William, with what?
With welding, dear Owner, dear Owner, dear Owner
With welding, dear Owner, dear Owner, with welding.
Welding is no option, dear William, dear William
Welding is no option, dear William, no option.
Then renew it, dear Owner, dear Owner, dear Owner
Then renew it, dear Owner, dear Owner, renew it
With what shall I renew it, dear William, dear William?
With what shall I renew it, dear William, with what?
With a new one, dear Owner, dear Owner, dear Owner
With a new one, dear Owner, dear Owner, with a new one

There’s a crack in my crankshaft, dear William, dear William
There’s a crack in my crankshaft, dear William, a CRACK
Use your head, now! dear Owner, dear Owner, dear owner
Use your head, now! dear Owner, dear Owner, use your head!

This Lyric so far
Suggestions are always welcome
ALFONS
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File Type: jpg Combi Fractured Crankshaft.jpg (98.7 KB, 28 views)

Last edited by averheijden; 1st April 2013 at 17:55..
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  #34  
Old 2nd April 2013, 01:10
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spell check

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hi averheijden,sm.yesterday.21:31.re:doxford eng,another great clip for a non engineer to view, thanks again,enjoy easter.ben27
I have just corrected my name.ben27
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  #35  
Old 5th April 2013, 15:49
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MV POLARPRINS for:
Hvalfangerselskapet Polaris A/S, (Melson & Melsom) Nanset, Larvik )


This ship had a 6 Cylinder Barclay Curle –Doxford engine, Type 75LB6, Total stroke 2,5 meters,8500 SHP

The ship was loaded and in the Mediterranean Sea the engine was stopped for a strange noise in the crankcase.
After investigation on found a broken dogleg between cylinders 4 and 5
Carefully turning back the crankshaft so that both parts were brought in to line with each other and welded with a steel plate by THE ENGINEROOM CREW!, see picture.

With reduced power, and on 5 cylinders on arrived in the port of Bougie where the cargo was pumped into another ship
After some more welding in the Port of Gibraltar, Lloyd’s agreed to make under reduced power to proceed the voyage to Amsterdam, where a new crankshaft was fitted (N.D.S.M. Shipyard, december 1964)

Particulars:
Story mv POLARPRINS with Barclay, Curle &Co - DOXFORD

So far this accident
Regards
Alfons

There’s a crack in my crankshaft, dear William, dear William
There’s a crack in my crankshaft, dear William, a CRACK
Then fix it, dear Owner, dear Owner, dear Owner
Then fix it, dear Owner, dear Owner, fix it!.
etc.etc.
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  #36  
Old 17th April 2013, 19:13
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Just found this on my HDD, can't remember where I got it from - apologies if it's already on the site.

Anyone know what's happened to Dr Griffiths? He used to have a good web site with profiles of the "Titanic's" Engineer Officers.
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File Type: pdf Griffiths Doxford Paper.pdf (3.61 MB, 25 views)
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  #37  
Old 19th April 2013, 08:30
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[QUOTE=Duncan

Anyone know what's happened to Dr Griffiths? He used to have a good web site with profiles of the "Titanic's" Engineer Officers.[/QUOTE]

I found this,

http://www.uco.es/~ff1mumuj/titanic1.htm

Regards
Alfons
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  #38  
Old 20th April 2013, 07:20
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hi averheijden,sm.yesterday.21:31.re:doxford eng,another great clip for a non engineer to view, thanks again,enjoy easter.ben27
spell check.re name
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  #39  
Old 20th April 2013, 07:29
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hi averheijden,sm.yesterday.21:31.re:doxford eng,another great clip for a non engineer to view, thanks again,enjoy easter.ben27
spell check.
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  #40  
Old 20th April 2013, 07:31
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hi averheijden,sm.yesterday.21:31.re:doxford eng,another great clip for a non engineer to view, thanks again,enjoy easter.ben27
spell check.i keep putting 21.should 27.
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  #41  
Old 20th April 2013, 07:32
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hi averheijden,sm.yesterday.21:31.re:doxford eng,another great clip for a non engineer to view, thanks again,enjoy easter.ben27
spell check.21 to 27
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  #42  
Old 23rd April 2013, 09:38
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Thanks Alfons, I've bookmarked it
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  #43  
Old 24th April 2013, 14:06
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Very interesting piece. ... Alfons have you tried speaking to Tmac ? he knows every thing about the Titanic...
Ben27 I think you have lost the plot...

Stephen
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  #44  
Old 25th April 2013, 03:57
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good day captain61.yesterday.23:06.re:i think you lost the plot.i have been trieng to delete my post's.but they do not show the delete procerdure.if you can offer advice as to deliting my messages.i would appreciate it.thank you ben27
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  #45  
Old 1st May 2013, 08:46
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Looking for something else and came across this http://www.cultureshock.org.uk/stori...-shanghai.html Which reminded me of an IMechE paper I have - bandwidth prevents me from attaching it but it is here under practical papers - the one about crankshaft realignment - a wealth of other interest also http://www.imeche.org/knowledge/presidents-choice
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  #46  
Old 1st May 2013, 17:03
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Looking for something else and came across this http://www.cultureshock.org.uk/stori...-shanghai.html
(Nov. 1991) Reason: “overspeeding”, during bad weather , North of France
The ships name at the time of repair was SEA RADIANCE, she was built as the ORIENT CITY for Readon Smiths of Cardiff. Engine type 76J8, the ship was a standard PANAMAX bulk carrier a number of which were built in Sunderland.
The ship’s staff had discovered that the shrink fittings on the crankshaft had moved

On the picture:
* Chief Engineer inspect the crankshaft Note: the big diameter from the crankshaftbearing (J-Type)
* Heating of the crank webs
* Bucket for dry-ice
* Jacks, to put the reference marks back in line
Regards
ALFONS
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File Type: jpg COMBIKRUKASREPAIR.jpg (102.5 KB, 22 views)
File Type: jpg GasenZuurstofflesse.jpg (14.2 KB, 14 views)
File Type: jpg Orient City.jpg (51.9 KB, 8 views)
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  #47  
Old 1st May 2013, 18:20
grahamwilliams grahamwilliams is offline  
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Graham 506606 or something like that.

I was an apprentice on the ss. coulgarve with its Doxford engine in 1951 as we approached Barbados at about 0600 hrs there was a loud explosion in the engine room and we had to be towed to Bridgetown by a tour ship and the middle of the three tow ropes never came out of the water. All the potatoes in the cargo had to be off loaded into barges and the spare parts had to be flown out.
Other than that minor pause it was a great trip. The top speed was 10 knots when the engine did work.
I gather it was an experimental version and normally very reliable.
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  #48  
Old 1st May 2013, 18:45
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I was an apprentice on the ss. coulgarve with its Doxford engine in 1951 as we approached Barbados at about 0600 hrs there was a loud explosion in the engine room and we had to be towed to Bridgetown
What was the reason of the explosion?
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  #49  
Old 20th May 2013, 20:57
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This for sale on ebay - postage a bit pricey though http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Magic-Lant...item2ec790c5fa

I attach a copy of the listing for reference once it vanishes (90 days I think)

Mods - if you think this breaches copyright guidelines please remove.
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  #50  
Old 31st October 2014, 17:54
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I was an apprentice on the ss. coulgarve with its Doxford engine in 1951 as we approached Barbados at about 0600 hrs there was a loud explosion in the engine room and we had to be towed to Bridgetown <snip> The top speed was 10 knots when the engine did work. I gather it was an experimental version and normally very reliable.
Engine of COULGARVE normally listed as a four-cylinder compound steam engine, made by Rankin & Blackmore, Greenock - perhaps the Fredrikstad design.
Anyone have a 1950 LR handy?
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