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Refrigeration Engineers

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  #51  
Old 29th September 2015, 21:02
Engine Serang Engine Serang is offline  
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There is ubdoubtedly a wealth of hard earned engineering and nautical knowledge available on SN.
However a chap would need to be very careful before giving or using advice from this forum, as in the art world provenance is vital.
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  #52  
Old 30th September 2015, 06:52
bbking bbking is offline
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Unerstood gentlemans I'm loging out from your forum
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  #53  
Old 2nd October 2015, 10:09
steamer659 steamer659 is offline  
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Really Serang?

Provenance- "the place of origin or earliest known history of something."

What exactly do you mean by the above statement? Yes, if a lad at sea needs help, it will be more than a pleasure to assist- that's what good Chief Engineer's do.....
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  #54  
Old 2nd October 2015, 17:24
Engine Serang Engine Serang is offline  
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Steamer 659, I agree with you. Nobody values the help and advice handed down over the years more than me, and I hope some of my advice was taken on board by the junior engineers I sailed with.
However things have changed in the shipping world, Risk, risk is the current buzzword and it must be eliminated or reduced to as low as reasonably practicable. All decisions should have a paper trail and if something goes wrong a Surveyor/Inspector/Auditor will carry out a Root Cause Analysis. Tell him that one of your actions was based on information you gleaned from a chap on the internet and this I guess, would result in a Major Non Conformity and a slap on the wrist. Thus my assertion that advice must be from a source that can be authenticated.
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  #55  
Old 3rd October 2015, 00:49
steamer659 steamer659 is offline  
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Agreed, sounds like the lad needed help...
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  #56  
Old 3rd October 2015, 20:27
Bill Morrison Bill Morrison is offline  
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Steamer659. I agree with you on this one. How do you gain knowledge without some instruction. I sail on refrigerated cargo ship and have very basic understanding of what was involved.
I purchased a volume of W.J. Fox's Marine Auxiliary Machinery which covers all aspects of ships plant apart from the Main Engines. It has a section on Refrigeration and another on Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning. I found it a great help when trying understand how some pieces of machinery work.
If BBKING is still watching this thread try and find a book which covers this subject.
Bill
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  #57  
Old 4th October 2015, 01:53
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There really is no training that is better than doing the actual work hands on. On The Job Training. Hence shipboard unlicensed ratings begin with an entry rating of Wiper, OS or Food Handler. That is the way I learned, by doing it. I was a Coalpasser, Wiper, F/WT and Oiler spread over six years.

I had the very good fortune to be taken under the wing of a fellow named Jim McKillip for whom I Oiled two years. In truth Jim was Lazy, he preferred to spend his watch in the air-conditioned engine room office, reading paperback novels. While I did my work and his. But I was eager to learn that is why I was there.

I recall one early morning 0000-0400 watch I was testing boiler water when the C/E Louis Vieu, unexpectedly for the early hour, came below. He did not say anything to me, but looked at me a few times, while he was getting his coffee. But then he went up to the office and talked with Jim. A short while later when the C/E was returning topside he said to me 'keep up the good work'.

Months later in the fall, all of the engineers were up forward fixing a broken hatch crane. On my relief round I discovered the electric motor driving the online boiler water feed pump, coupling end bearing, glowing white-hot.

I dashed up and told the F/WT I was going to stop and that is what I did stopped the main engine. Then I ran below and started the backup feed pump. I had that running and the other secured and was bringing the main engine back up to speed. When I was descended upon by five engineers lead by a livid 1 A/E who was screaming and spitting in my face.

Louis Vieu told all the engineers to go up to the office and he would be along shortly. I told Louis what I saw and what I did. Louis said 'in the future when this happens run the telegraph to stop and ignore the ringing telephone. Good job."

I envied State School Ship engineer grads they were provided with the OJT along with a formal college education sans sports teams and the like. Maine, Massachusetts, New York, Texas, California and, now, Great Lakes Academy.

Kings Point was more college than OJT Kings Point competed with local colleges in sailing and rowing and possibly other sports? Kings Point folks got a very good education but their OJT was left to US flag ship's crew, where they were 'Cadets' for a few weeks each summer.

The state schools students live aboard ship year round and begin as wipers or OS and progress up the unlicensed ratings year to year. They stand the watches, maintain and operate the plant in their roles as F/WT and Oiler. Summers they go for a long distance cruise.

Greg Hayden
Vista, CA USA
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  #58  
Old 24th May 2017, 17:38
SlaterGordonID SlaterGordonID is offline
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Refrigeration Engineers

How would our marine refrigeration engineer client, David Blackburn, have come into contact with asbestos? He has unfortunately died of mesothelioma and his family need help with how he came into contact with it. He worked for J & E Hall (Dartford) as an apprentice engineer from 1946 to 1948 and he was then in merchant navy from 1948 to 1959 as a refrigeration engineer on cargo ships including the SS Himalaya, Queen of Bermuda, MV Nottingham, SS Corinth, MV Cedrio, MV Canopic, Southern Cross. Any help would be much appreciated.
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  #59  
Old 24th May 2017, 22:42
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Ron Stringer Ron Stringer is online now
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Originally Posted by SlaterGordonID View Post
How would our marine refrigeration engineer client, David Blackburn, have come into contact with asbestos?
These two threads contain postings that may help your search.

https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showth...light=asbestos

https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showth...light=asbestos
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  #60  
Old 24th May 2017, 23:54
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John Rogers John Rogers is offline  
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Engine Room staff were always in touch with asbestos, I was always assisting an engineer to pack and wrap pipes in the engine room, even painting them with whitewash would make the dust from the particles fly in the air.
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  #61  
Old 25th May 2017, 10:11
BlueScouse BlueScouse is offline  
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My ship carries refrigerated containers and the electricians look after them, with assistance from fitter when needed.
Record so far is 1620 reefer boxes carried, with 2 electricians to look after them.
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  #62  
Old 28th May 2017, 21:36
sternchallis sternchallis is offline
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Originally Posted by Pete Axon View Post
Hello Bob, your right about Reefers not posting. I did many trips on OCL Bay Ships with the Chief Fridge, Graham Santi, he was the best Fridge Eng in the MN ( well he said he was ! ) Graham went onto the P&O Cruise ships and has now retired, what a brilliant bloke tho, never a dull moment on any ship he was on, doubt he will read this, he doesn't have Email, Facebook and doubt if he uses a Mobile phone. Best regards, Pete Axon ex 3/O/E
Sure it wasn't Mike Santi?
We had a Chief Freezer from P&O passenger ships join Blue Star mid '70's and he was quite a character. Never saw him dirty. Think he used to supervise the fridge and mains greasers to do any dirty work.
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  #63  
Old 31st May 2017, 16:08
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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On a Whitco reefer Orchidea we were anchored in Tokyo bay in a heatwave.The air con was down and we were putting damp towels in our cabin fridges in an attempt to keep cool.About 2 am on a sleepless night my missus and i wandered down to the bar to find it packed as we drank cold beers and complained the Reefer wandered down,looking surprised he asked why we were all down at that hour of the night.When we told him he said`That`s funny it`s cool in my cabin`
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  #64  
Old 31st May 2017, 17:21
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duquesa duquesa is offline  
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Refrigeration Engineers

My memory frequently plays tricks with me nowadays but I'm sure that on the big Houlder meat boats, there were three frig.engineers. As I recall they were men of long service in the company and always appeared to be a satisfied bunch. I never gave them much thought as they simply "got on with the job".
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  #65  
Old 31st May 2017, 21:44
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8 February 1968 3 A/E me joined a C3 SS Pecos in Yokahama - it was a fly-out job to replace an engineer with a broken leg. 3 April 68 promoted to 2 A/E I signed on another voyage. The vessel had been owned and operated by Matson for decades under three different names. Oriental Exporters/Ogden Marine was operating her in 1968.

The vessel had freezer boxes outboard of the square of the hatch in the upper and 'tween cargo decks. We loaded frozen foods at the Alameda Reefer Dock in San Francisco Bay. Once the reefer was aboard we shifted over to OAT [Oakland Army Terminal]. Where we loaded POV's [Privately Owned (US Military members) Vehicles] in the square of the hatch of the upper and 'tween cargo decks.

Outbound we stopped first at Pearl Harbor US Navy Base for two days then shifted over to Honolulu to complete discharging the POV's. Then we would go on to Midway Island where we discharged the entire reefer. This contract for the reefer and POV's came with the ship.

US flag ships that I sailed the tanker pump men, stick ship general cargo electricians, and reefer refrigeration engineers were unlicensed personnel. Being Hawaii is an American port and we were in there for a weekend we engineers were relieved of watch keeping by local union members ie: Night Engineers.

I don't know where the idea came from but our first 24 hours in Pearl the two reefer engineers, who worked six and six, were given 24 hours off; with we engineers standing our regular watches in the reefer machinery space. I stood two watches there and I had NO knowledge or experience of what I was doing. I was nervous as a cat. I adhered to the advice given - don't TOUCH anything. In the end everything ran like clockwork but I was glad to get out of that space. We engineers then had the weekend off having to return to shift from Pearl to Honolulu.

We had rented an open with a canvas top, four place, tiny, imported from Japan Jeep like vehicle, and a Honda three wheeler motorcycle, with a pair of black leather seats in back facing aft. We five shall we say 'feeling-no-pain' engineers showed up for the shift. We got the mates to load our rental vehicles on deck, we WERE set up for handling vehicles. It took all five of us to make the shift -- the C/E was on the throttle - none of us even put on our work clothes. Soon as our Night Engineer reported for duty - he had driven his car from Pearl - we left. The mates stuck out toys on the pier and off we roared.

Once the reefer cargo was gone in Midway, the two reefer engineers worked for the 1 A/E days on reefer room and engine room maintenance and repairs. After Midway we went on to Japan and Vietnam returning to Eureka CA 10 June '68 where we loaded a deck cargo of wooden timbers. I paid off 14 June '68 at OAT in Oakland.

Greg Hayden
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  #66  
Old 12th June 2017, 09:32
noelmavisk noelmavisk is offline  
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I joined the RMS Deseado as 4th Engineer on her last trip up the West Coast. At voyage end she was dry-docked in Hamburg and was converted to a fully refrigerated vessel for the South American meat run. With a full cargo she had 3 Freezers, Chief, 2nd, and 3rd.
We would travel from London to Buenos Aires empty, with a Chief and 2nd Freezers in place who would be basically both be on day-watch duty. The engine room would carry an extra junior engineer outward bound who on arrival in BA would become 3rd Freezer, and homeward bound with full cargo of chilled and frozen meat the 3 freezers would resort to regular watch-keeping.
I spent 2 years on the Deseado during which time I did 2 voyages as 2nd freezer keeping the 8 - 12 watch homeward bound and on days outward bound.
My first trip as 2nd freezer was a disaster, the Chief freezer was new to the ship and proved to be a drinker and socializer, and spent little time showing me the ropes, especially on how and when to defrost.
Homeward bound the Chief spent little time keeping his watch and it was left to me and the 3rd, also on his first trip as freezer, to try and keep things going. Unfortunately our inexperience was costly and temperatures went all to hell. Swear to God when they unloaded the cargo in London some of the carcasses were walking off on their own. Lost about half the cargo.
Chief freezer was canned but the 3rd and I did the next voyage with a new more experienced Chief. Don't think that bad cargo voyage hurt my reputation as after my second trip as freezer I was promoted to Junior 3rd Engineer on the Deseado.
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  #67  
Old 15th August 2017, 12:24
SlaterGordonID SlaterGordonID is offline
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Originally Posted by raybnz View Post
I did two trips working in the Freezer Department. First as a Junior Engineer on Shaw Savill's Corinthic and then as 2nd Freezer on the Cretic. I found it a bit boring and went back into the Engine Room.

However on the coast the 16 on 32 off watches were good for the socializing part of my sea going career.
Hi. We act for the family of a gentleman who was exposed to asbestos on the SS Corinthic and developed an asbestos related condition. Are you able to assist?
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  #68  
Old 15th August 2017, 12:28
SlaterGordonID SlaterGordonID is offline
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SS Corinthic

Did anyone work on the SS Corinthic? We act for the family of a gentleman who was exposed to asbestos, and sadly died as a result. We are looking for anyone who was on the Corinthic between 1954 and 1957. Look forward to hearing from you.
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  #69  
Old 15th August 2017, 17:33
stehogg stehogg is offline  
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As an engineer cadet with Blu Flu we all spent time during our apprenticeship working alongside personel from SG Dobsons refrigeration engineers from Wallasey.Stan Dobson was a great bloke with a wealth of refrigeration and his second in command Mr Tiplady(tip)All of Tips gear went into the back of an old Morris Minor Traveller which amazingly never seemed to break down despite the weight of said gear.Happy days.
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  #70  
Old 19th August 2017, 04:41
raybnz raybnz is offline  
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Hi. We act for the family of a gentleman who was exposed to asbestos on the SS Corinthic and developed an asbestos related condition. Are you able to assist?
Hi

If I can be of any help to assist your client count me in.
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  #71  
Old 19th August 2017, 21:20
alaric alaric is online now  
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Originally Posted by SlaterGordonID View Post
Did anyone work on the SS Corinthic? We act for the family of a gentleman who was exposed to asbestos, and sadly died as a result. We are looking for anyone who was on the Corinthic between 1954 and 1957. Look forward to hearing from you.
I sailed in Shaw Savill's Corinthic from October 1964 until February 1966, initially as 3rd Engineer then 2nd Engineer. Raybnz (post #70 ) was also on board for some of that time.
I was diagnosed as suffering from asbestosis a few years ago and my solicitors made a successful claim against Shaw Savill's insurers.
Please send a private message and tell me what information you require to make a claim on behalf of your client. I will be pleased to help
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  #72  
Old 4th September 2017, 16:35
SlaterGordonID SlaterGordonID is offline
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Refrigeration Engineer

Our client sailed on the following ships during the following periods:

SS Himalaya Feb 1953 - Sept 1953
TEV Queen of Bermuda Oct 1953-Dec 1954
MV Nottingham Sept 1954 - June 1955
SS Corinthic Sept 1955-Oct 1956
MV Cedric March 1957-Jan 1958
MV Canopic March 1958
Southern Cross 1958

Did you or anyone you know sail on any of these ships at that time.

We look forward to hearing from you.
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  #73  
Old 6th September 2017, 18:51
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Ian J. Huckin Ian J. Huckin is offline  
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Ian! Your "footnote" re "the rain getting in".

You don't think it's anything to do with the damage CFC's have done-----do you. Salaams, Phil
Ah yes, could be...we would loose literally tons of R22 each voyage...
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  #74  
Old 13th September 2017, 09:40
Supern Supern is offline  
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Originally Posted by SlaterGordonID View Post
Our client sailed on the following ships during the following periods:

SS Himalaya Feb 1953 - Sept 1953
TEV Queen of Bermuda Oct 1953-Dec 1954
MV Nottingham Sept 1954 - June 1955
SS Corinthic Sept 1955-Oct 1956
MV Cedric March 1957-Jan 1958
MV Canopic March 1958
Southern Cross 1958

Did you or anyone you know sail on any of these ships at that time.



We look forward to hearing from you.
I am in Australia and my husband died of Mesothelioma but prior to his death he had a claim in UK USA and Australia. I still get funds form the USA from different trusts when they pay out. He got a disability pension and a very good one from the UK until he passed and had a large settlement in Australia. Ryan Carlisle did our case

As it stands here it does not matter who people work for its the diagnosis of mesothelioma that is the key.
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