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  #26  
Old 14th May 2013, 18:21
john powles john powles is offline  
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darlein

Quote:
Originally Posted by expats View Post
I joined the 'Demeterton' as R/O in Amsterdam in jan 1968. The R/O before me had some sort of skin complaint (his nickname was "The Plant")....The captain was Williams??? and 2nd mate was Bamber?(the apprentices nicknamed him "The Bishop") a real dour character and an engineer who'd played rugby for Hartlepool; a fitness fanatic. There was also the 'randiest' apprentice I'd ever come across; he looked and acted like Mick Jagger but he could certainly 'pull' the girls...

There was a rule that when buying cases of beer (Tennants) every can with a picture of "Ann?? boating on Loch Lomond" was deemed a 'clit can' and was put into a communal collection and drunk by all (I once had a case with almost half as 'clit cans': an expensive case)

She was possibly the worst feeder I'd ever been on. The fat and gristle from sunday's roast was served as a curry on monday and several day's potatoes were usually peeled in one go and left in buckets on deck where they seemed to dry out (I remember chips being as brown inside as out)
Hi again. when you were in darlien china & went over to the other british ship did you have one of those cheap air rifles to have a compertition with them because I made up a load of round targets to fire at whilst we were over there the losers had to supply the beer. I dont recall the out come just that it was great fun at the time & the red gaurds did,nt boter us. however they did enjoy watching us work in the engine room & also when we played cards at lunchtime {hunt the cu--t}as it was commonlly called.I was a bit unpopular at the game because I won to often.I remember a red guard {female} on the unloading crane knocking a wagon off the rail tracks which caused a load of funny hand gestures she was not very popular after that, much waving of the red book though.John
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  #27  
Old 14th May 2013, 18:40
expats expats is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by john powles View Post
Hi again. when you were in darlien china & went over to the other british ship did you have one of those cheap air rifles to have a compertition with them because I made up a load of round targets to fire at whilst we were over there the losers had to supply the beer. I dont recall the out come just that it was great fun at the time & the red gaurds did,nt boter us. however they did enjoy watching us work in the engine room & also when we played cards at lunchtime {hunt the cu--t}as it was commonlly called.I was a bit unpopular at the game because I won to often.I remember a red guard {female} on the unloading crane knocking a wagon off the rail tracks which caused a load of funny hand gestures she was not very popular after that, much waving of the red book though.John
I had a cheap air pistol and holster..... I remember playing table tennis at the 'Friendship Club'; winning the first game where-upon the guy sat down and read 'The Little Red Book' and then won the next two games 21-0....I bought a carpet and a picture made of feathers (I must have been drunk).

"Chase the Lady" (I'm being genteel) was THE card game there....
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  #28  
Old 15th May 2013, 16:59
john powles john powles is offline  
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darlien

Hi again.I to bought one of those pictures made of feathers & it is now sort of a family hairloom as it has been passed down to my great nephew & its still in good condition, I also bought at the time a set of compasses which are still in use by me today. the air rifle also is still in the family that to is an hairloom the spring is a bit week now but its still in good nick with the original box to beleive or not I saw some lads with the same one doing a bit shooting -told them about mine & when I told them the price I paid in China for it they would,nt beleive me {£2-17shl & theirs cost in the region of £50 odd .
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  #29  
Old 15th May 2013, 22:48
expats expats is offline  
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I also bought a toy bear pushing a drum....My daughter was 18 months old and was terrified of its flashing eyes...Mind you when she saw me she screamed; that lasted all of half an hour because we all went to the beach and 'daddy' carried her home.....
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  #30  
Old 21st May 2013, 21:02
baileysan baileysan is offline  
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Did a spell with Chapmans as 2/E(for reasons quite complicated) in the late 60's coasted a couple and then sailed on the Brighton for 6 months. Doxford economy, C/E went off me as I had ticket which meant he lost x number of pounds per months for not sailing with dispensation 2/E. Quite avoyage however I had worse food on many a so called quality company vessel.I did meet up with a Superintendent called Mr Coates, a real gentleman and true engineer and he gave me advice which I was never to regret. I was fortunate to meet up with him again in later life. Chapmans , put it down to life's experiances.
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  #31  
Old 10th September 2017, 20:23
davemoore davemoore is offline
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Did a 7month trip on the Lynton Aug 59 toMarch 60 sailed from Hartlepool paid off Manchester after a good trip,although not the best reader had a great crew,part of voyage was from Rio Grand Del Sol to Yokohama ,Japan ,was a bloody long time at sea I understand it was about 60 days .the cook was a Goodun but ended up almost starved .The drinking was the colour of beer but didn't taste like it.ive read on this site about all the other Chatty Chapman trampers ,but nobody seems to have sailed on lovEd to here of anyone who did The captain was called Towler ,the chief steward was Ernie Hone.
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  #32  
Old 17th September 2017, 15:44
George Bis George Bis is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by baileysan View Post
Did a spell with Chapmans as 2/E(for reasons quite complicated) in the late 60's coasted a couple and then sailed on the Brighton for 6 months. Doxford economy, C/E went off me as I had ticket which meant he lost x number of pounds per months for not sailing with dispensation 2/E. Quite avoyage however I had worse food on many a so called quality company vessel.I did meet up with a Superintendent called Mr Coates, a real gentleman and true engineer and he gave me advice which I was never to regret. I was fortunate to meet up with him again in later life. Chapmans , put it down to life's experiances.
I never realised that a C/E would get more money in the circumstances but I suppose it makes sense.
Was there much difference between a dispensation 2/E and a Certificated one?
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  #33  
Old 17th September 2017, 16:32
tiachapman tiachapman is offline  
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they were,nt called chatty chapmans for nothing
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  #34  
Old 17th September 2017, 17:05
lakercapt lakercapt is offline  
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In the days of long ago Ropners were enowned as bad feeders. Some were and it depended on the captain and c/s.
What won't fatten and won't kill so we had lovely duffs twice a week.
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  #35  
Old 17th September 2017, 17:47
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Tony Morris Tony Morris is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lakercapt View Post
In the days of long ago Ropners were enowned as bad feeders. Some were and it depended on the captain and c/s.
What won't fatten and won't kill so we had lovely duffs twice a week.
Was on the Bridgepool, Stonepool & Rudby never had any complaints with the food.
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  #36  
Old 17th September 2017, 20:27
brooksy brooksy is offline  
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Was on the Barlby of Ropners.I remember one evening meal the Chief Steward gave the mess so called pork chops and the saloon were dining on steaks.The pork chops consisted of bone and fat with an inkling of meat.They were not edible.Of we went enmass to the stewards cabin were a row broke out.Being not far from the saloon the old man heard the commotion came out and see what was happening.Chief Steward well and truly bollocked we went back down to the mess were the chief cook was waiting with those words we wanted to hear in the first place.How would you like your steaks boys.Victory for the mess
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  #37  
Old 17th September 2017, 22:22
bill thompson bill thompson is offline  
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Hey Dave you guys had sailed and we (New Westminster City)followed you into whatever port it was in Japan...A few of us walked into a bar,,the girls were really excited,,,Lynton,,Lynton,,Lynton was all they could say.
But mate we rose to the occasion and followed the tradition of British tramp men.
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  #38  
Old 17th September 2017, 23:38
lakercapt lakercapt is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Morris View Post
Was on the Bridgepool, Stonepool & Rudby never had any complaints with the food.
If you care to look Tony you will see in my profile I was in Ropners in the late 50's early 60's when there a big change.
Maybe they did but I was commenting about my time there which was long ago but I have written about my experiances on ships long gone.
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  #39  
Old 23rd September 2017, 19:06
bgrace bgrace is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davemoore View Post
Did a 7month trip on the Lynton Aug 59 toMarch 60 sailed from Hartlepool paid off Manchester after a good trip,although not the best reader had a great crew,part of voyage was from Rio Grand Del Sol to Yokohama ,Japan ,was a bloody long time at sea I understand it was about 60 days .the cook was a Goodun but ended up almost starved .The drinking was the colour of beer but didn't taste like it.ive read on this site about all the other Chatty Chapman trampers ,but nobody seems to have sailed on lovEd to here of anyone who did The captain was called Towler ,the chief steward was Ernie Hone.
Sailed with Ernie Hone from March to October 1960 on the Scorton
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  #40  
Old 23rd September 2017, 20:26
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Pat Kennedy Pat Kennedy is offline  
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PSNC took some beating in the hungry ships league. I was in the Cotopaxi, lived on toast most of the time.
Pat
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"Life is a waste of time, and time is a waste of life. Get wasted all the time, and you'll have the time of your life!"
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  #41  
Old 23rd September 2017, 22:22
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duquesa duquesa is offline  
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Hungry Ships

I served some time with Zim many years back. Nearly starved to death. Walked away in the end and paid my own airfare home. Once I told them I was leaving, they wouldn't even give me a pass out of the dock.
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  #42  
Old 24th September 2017, 13:09
davemoore davemoore is offline
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Hungry snips

Hi Bill if you had been at sea 60days Rio grand del Sol to Yokohama we were hungry for guess what ? I leave the rest to your imagination. Lynton Lynton Lynton
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  #43  
Old 24th September 2017, 15:41
tom roberts tom roberts is offline  
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At the Indefatigable 1953 the food was so bad one time we decided to stage a food boycott and refused to leave the mess deck,well Mr Derreck put it to us that we eat up as when we went to sea not all the companies fed you well and we should treat this food as a lesson preparing us for such companies bad feeders,I will never forget the first meal we had at the Indie when we got of the train from Liverpool it was a horrible mince on a slab of bread,strange tho I put on weight during my 9 months hard there,one of the worst feeders was the Regent Lion even the Indie didn't prepare us for that one.
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  #44  
Old 24th September 2017, 17:13
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duquesa duquesa is offline  
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Hungry

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Hi Bill if you had been at sea 60days Rio grand del Sol to Yokohama we were hungry for guess what ? I leave the rest to your imagination. Lynton Lynton Lynton
This is true indeed! However, losing two stone in three months through total lack of nourishment is not my idea of paradise. So I left..
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  #45  
Old 24th September 2017, 18:14
slick slick is offline  
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All,
Some of Hains could be grim (pre - Hain - Nourse) and the longer the voyage the worse things became.
Water was always a problem for us and rationing was routine.
MV Trevelyan, Aden to Moji cargo of salt, the old man Captain Stewart bought some fantastic German Lager in 1 Litre bottles which sold to us at a shilling a go.
As Apprentices we thought we would be out of the loop, not so we queued with the best a bottle a night, straight out of the Meat Room.
Sitting on number Four Hatch on a Tropical evening supping subsidised beer in good company, truly memorable.
Oh, happy days.

Yours aye,

slick
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  #46  
Old 24th September 2017, 20:51
Ian Lawson Ian Lawson is offline  
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I know Tatems had a poor reputation 'T on the funnel FA in the fridge' but I found them OK and better than a few of the other tramp companies I sailed in.
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  #47  
Old 25th September 2017, 18:56
davemoore davemoore is offline
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Bgrace as matter how did you find Ernie Hone,one thing about he always had stacks of. Cash. In many currencies.He would provide loans charging very little interest.Found him a canny chap but could never work out his gender. Dave
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  #48  
Old 25th September 2017, 20:36
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Binnacle Binnacle is offline  
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Poorest feeder I had the misfortune to sail on, ss Pendeen, owner Chellew of Cardiff, 1949.
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  #49  
Old 27th September 2017, 18:06
bgrace bgrace is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davemoore View Post
Bgrace as matter how did you find Ernie Hone,one thing about he always had stacks of. Cash. In many currencies.He would provide loans charging very little interest.Found him a canny chap but could never work out his gender. Dave
Hi Dave been trying to recall him but only have a memory of a round chubby Londoner who had black slick ' brycleam' hair but checking the crew list there was another Londoner who was Assist Steward and it may be him
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  #50  
Old 28th September 2017, 17:34
Split Split is offline  
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I've forgotten the names of the most infamous companies, but everyone knew of them, it was no secret.

I was a pool officer for a few years. The 2nd mate of the ship on my last voyage as apprentice conned me into the joys of the pool, with overtime and other benefits!

Nevertheless, green as I was, I managed to stay clear of Chapman's, Hungry Hogarth and others. How did these companies get men? There must have been some reason because, in the fifties there was a shortage of officers-- especially engineers. I finished my pool contract and found a company, where I stayed until I left the sea.
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