Birdy Boat Air Conditioning mystery. - Ships Nostalgia
17:59

Welcome
Welcome!Welcome to Ships Nostalgia, the world's greatest online community for people worldwide with an interest in ships and shipping. Whether you are crew, ex-crew, ship enthusiasts or cruisers, this is the forum for you. And what's more, it's completely FREE.

Click here to go to the forums home page and find out more.
Click here to join.
Log in
User Name Password

Birdy Boat Air Conditioning mystery.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 24th January 2016, 05:18
barnsey's Avatar
barnsey barnsey is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Navigation
Active: 1955 - 2005
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
My location
Posts: 2,912
Birdy Boat Air Conditioning mystery.

Recent discussions beteween two other ex BP Tanker friends of much the same vintage as myself expressed the novelty of the first Air Conditioning and in particular that a particular Mk I Birdy Boat had full a/c.... implying they all had full air conditioning.

My recollection is that only Mk II's had fully airconditioning and that only 'selective areas' were a/c in Mk I's.


Subsequent detailed inspection of 'Birdy Boat' midships accommodation has revealed that it seems there were modifications done at some stage. Have a look yourselves at photos of Mk I 'Birds' as near new as possible, that is in 'proper colours' and you will see the two 'Thermotank units' sitting at the after end of the Bridge deck ... quite low profile. Then find the same ship at a later stage in her life after the grey paint has gone and you will see trunking has 'sprung' upwards and over onto the Monkey Island. suggesting that a/c has been added.

Here is a shot by Dave Leckie showing just what I am discussing .. British Kiwi taken in 1971 ..shows the 'new' trunking perfectly.
https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/galler...-view-/cat/503


Mk II Birds the 'Thermotanks' cannot be seen and I cannot remember where they disappeared too ... next deck down stbd side in the accommodation?

Looking forward to some definite answers.

David
__________________
Barnsey Consciousness: Those annoying times before and after Personal Fatigue Management, ZZZZzzzzz

Last edited by barnsey; 24th January 2016 at 05:43..
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 24th January 2016, 11:42
twogrumpy's Avatar
twogrumpy twogrumpy is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1968 - 1986
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 1,944
Yo Barnsey.

As I recall( not something to rely on), the Osprey had full air con, and the compressor equipment for the aft units may well have been stbd side of the boat deck. Thermotanks were port and stbd aft boat decks, afraid I can't place the midships unit.
Where the Thermotank faceplate fan starters operated by a square drive of about 1/2", special key provided, nobody could ever find the key and so the squares were normally chewed up.


Thermotank
October 1951.

of 150 Helen Street, Govan, Glasgow

1900 [1] /1908 [2] Company founded by Alexander William Stewart and his two brothers Frederick and William[3]

1910 The Great Eastern Railway Co's turbine steamer St Petersburg was fitted with the Thermotank heating and ventilation system[4]

1916 Formation of Thermotank Shell Co

1922 Ventilating, Heating and Cooling Engineers, 55, West Regent Street Glasgow. Maker of patented ventilating units and ventilating fans.

1924 Name changed.

1939 See Aircraft Industry Suppliers

1955 Name changed.

1959 Merger of J. and E. Hall with Thermotank, forming Hall-Thermotank[5]

1961 Air conditioning, heating and ventilating engineers. 1,350 employees.[6]
__________________
The greatest cross I have to bear is the cross of Lorraine.

Last edited by twogrumpy; 24th January 2016 at 14:11..
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 24th January 2016, 20:39
sparks69 sparks69 is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Radio Officer
Active: 1966 - 1986
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 451
The Gannet didn't have A/C, I slept on deck when it got hot ! (and was hosed down most mornings by the bridge watchman as a wake up call !) The R/O's aft facing cabin was a mite warm with only a sparking DC fan to stir the air round.
Still one of my most memorable trips on a great ship.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 24th January 2016, 20:48
gadgee gadgee is offline   SN Supporter
Super Moderator
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Navigation
Active: 1966 - 1979
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 3,911
Did three months Indian Coast on the Kiwi from September to November 1967 - Bombay, Kandla, Okha, Madras, Calcutta etc and she had no A/C.
__________________
Paul J.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 24th January 2016, 21:28
chrishandel chrishandel is offline  
Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Radio Officer
Active: 1972 - 1982
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 51
If I recall, the Bird boats had a ventilation trunk fitted which came out on Monkey Island. There was a wooden slide over the end of it in the R/Os cabin. Completely ineffectual as they had been painted solid. They where worse in the winter when carrying lube oils and steam on deck was needed
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 24th January 2016, 21:38
barnsey's Avatar
barnsey barnsey is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Navigation
Active: 1955 - 2005
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
My location
Posts: 2,912
Right, that seems to confirm that the Mk I Birds did not have AC in their early days and that it may well have been added in the late 60's early 70's. Certainly they had a lot of work done on them around that time ....all cargo tanks were sand blasted and epoxy coated for example. That was a major job and major expense.....things are at the back of my mind .... I was on one when we did the tanks.
__________________
Barnsey Consciousness: Those annoying times before and after Personal Fatigue Management, ZZZZzzzzz
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 24th January 2016, 22:56
jimthehat's Avatar
jimthehat jimthehat is offline  
ELDER MEMBER
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 1,034
Interesting thread david,i remember in the early bank boats that there was a gap at the bottom of all cabin doors(something to do with the A/C),This was not the case on later ships that i sailed om,
jim
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 24th January 2016, 23:31
Hamish Mackintosh Hamish Mackintosh is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 2,567
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimthehat View Post
Interesting thread david,i remember in the early bank boats that there was a gap at the bottom of all cabin doors(something to do with the A/C),This was not the case on later ships that i sailed om,
jim
The gap at the door sill was the escape route for the cockroaches
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 25th January 2016, 09:12
jimthehat's Avatar
jimthehat jimthehat is offline  
ELDER MEMBER
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 1,034
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hamish Mackintosh View Post
The gap at the door sill was the escape route for the cockroaches
WHAT(cockroaches never set foot on a bank Boat
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 25th January 2016, 11:18
sparks69 sparks69 is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Radio Officer
Active: 1966 - 1986
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 451
Never heard of Stealth Cockroaches ?
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 25th January 2016, 14:57
twogrumpy's Avatar
twogrumpy twogrumpy is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1968 - 1986
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 1,944
Called Bombay Roadrunners, the American military are fitting them with cameras for use by special forces.
__________________
The greatest cross I have to bear is the cross of Lorraine.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 25th January 2016, 16:16
david freeman david freeman is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,016
A/C The older 28's 32's

Somewhere in mind in the late 70's there was an alternative to the Freon gas compressors, cooling the air flow through the thermotank system of heating and ventilating: The alternative a/c cooling plant was a steam/air ejector monstrosity, fitted in the upper engine room/ funnel space (physical a large steel pressure vacuum vessel some 8-10 feet in dia, reputedly providing cool air for the Thermotank system
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 25th January 2016, 16:53
twogrumpy's Avatar
twogrumpy twogrumpy is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1968 - 1986
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 1,944
Yes David the steam jet system has been mentioned previously, not very reliable and costly on bunkers were the comments I believe, I was lucky enough never to sail with it.
There was of course the air conditioned dormitory down aft.
__________________
The greatest cross I have to bear is the cross of Lorraine.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 25th January 2016, 19:27
DAVELECKIE DAVELECKIE is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 699
Quote:
Originally Posted by barnsey View Post
Recent discussions beteween two other ex BP Tanker friends of much the same vintage as myself expressed the novelty of the first Air Conditioning and in particular that a particular Mk I Birdy Boat had full a/c.... implying they all had full air conditioning.

My recollection is that only Mk II's had fully airconditioning and that only 'selective areas' were a/c in Mk I's.


Subsequent detailed inspection of 'Birdy Boat' midships accommodation has revealed that it seems there were modifications done at some stage. Have a look yourselves at photos of Mk I 'Birds' as near new as possible, that is in 'proper colours' and you will see the two 'Thermotank units' sitting at the after end of the Bridge deck ... quite low profile. Then find the same ship at a later stage in her life after the grey paint has gone and you will see trunking has 'sprung' upwards and over onto the Monkey Island. suggesting that a/c has been added.

Here is a shot by Dave Leckie showing just what I am discussing .. British Kiwi taken in 1971 ..shows the 'new' trunking perfectly.
https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/galler...-view-/cat/503


Mk II Birds the 'Thermotanks' cannot be seen and I cannot remember where they disappeared too ... next deck down stbd side in the accommodation?

Looking forward to some definite answers.

David
Looking at that photo I took back in 1971, searching the memory banks the air condition compressor for midships was located aft, portside on the bridgedeck. I believe this was just behind the owners room/cabin.
She definitely had air conditioning and it was very good, so good in fact we use to go to movies in the smokeroom/dizzy donkey bar with jumpers and coats on. From memory there are some photos on here or possibly GTZX forum supplied by Sam Yorke showing myself and a few others including John Willans the C/E clad in slightly more than just whites.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 26th January 2016, 11:57
jep1916 jep1916 is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by sparks69 View Post
The Gannet didn't have A/C, I slept on deck when it got hot ! (and was hosed down most mornings by the bridge watchman as a wake up call !) The R/O's aft facing cabin was a mite warm with only a sparking DC fan to stir the air round.
Still one of my most memorable trips on a great ship.
I was 2/E on the Gannet in 1972. The Officers Saloon was located Aft and was Air Conditioned. The A/C Unit was located on the Aft Starboard Boat Deck and it used to ice up so badly that the cooling effect was totally lost.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 12th April 2016, 17:51
Malcolm Kirk Malcolm Kirk is offline  
Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Navigation
Active: 1961 - 1969
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 19
I was on the Curlew as my first ship in 61 she had some and the Cygnet a year or two later .They both had A/C not that we used it that much. I don't think the Trust did though.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 13th April 2016, 22:20
sparks69 sparks69 is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Radio Officer
Active: 1966 - 1986
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 451
Come to think of it were the earlier Bird Boats DC and not AC power ?
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 14th April 2016, 14:02
DAVELECKIE DAVELECKIE is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 699
Quote:
Originally Posted by sparks69 View Post
Come to think of it were the earlier Bird Boats DC and not AC power ?
All the bird boats except the Kestrel were DC.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 14th April 2016, 15:45
Malcolm Kirk Malcolm Kirk is offline  
Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Navigation
Active: 1961 - 1969
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 19
No wonder I was confused I spent a little time on the Kestrel as well as the Curlew and Cygnet not to mention the Trust enjoyed them all.Grand ships.
I remember the 7 cyl Sulzer that let us down on my first trip through Suez leading the southbound convoy.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 14th April 2016, 16:49
Robert Bush Robert Bush is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 165
Thermotank on wartime built British Tankers and on one BI passenger ship.

British Might had Thermotank fans and heaters. The Chief Engineer not the Master decided when it should be used and as it affected his bunker consumption he was loath to use it.

As a visitor on SS Aronda in an Indian port I noticed a brass plate in the officers toilets that read, "Please close the Louvre when using this space. " When asking about this I was told that a first class passenger had complained to the Master, a Scot about a noxious smell in the dinning saloon and the Master replied, "Let your wind gang free where ere ye be, in church or chappel let it rattle." The passenger was not mollified, hence the notice.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 15th April 2016, 20:47
jmirvine jmirvine is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malcolm Kirk View Post
No wonder I was confused I spent a little time on the Kestrel as well as the Curlew and Cygnet not to mention the Trust enjoyed them all.Grand ships.
I remember the 7 cyl Sulzer that let us down on my first trip through Suez leading the southbound convoy.
The Fulmar and the Curlew were the only 2 with Sulzer engines - and I had the misfortune to sail on both of them! Absolute crap!

I think the Fulmar was the worst ship I ever sailed on. We changed more pistons and liners than we had hot dinners. Once the main engine was started, you couldn't see because of the blue oily smoke. We were lucky if we ever had a couple of days without a breakdown.

Useless f***ing things!
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 15th April 2016, 23:06
Malcolm Kirk Malcolm Kirk is offline  
Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Navigation
Active: 1961 - 1969
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 19
True enough but we got some fishing in.Nice spell in Suez Bay as well.
Our engineers were good at working on that thing liners and rings etc.I spent about 13 months on her and drydocking in Glasgow.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 16th April 2016, 15:25
JohnBP JohnBP is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
My location
Posts: 228
JMI, not sure when you sailed in the Curlew, I was 4th for 6 months and we had no real issues, wonder what fixed the issues you saw.. J
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 16th April 2016, 17:11
Andrew147 Andrew147 is offline  
Member
Department: Engineering
Active: 1968 - 1986
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 40
[QUOTE=jmirvine;1965457]The Fulmar and the Curlew were the only 2 with Sulzer engines - and I had the misfortune to sail on both of them! Absolute crap!

I had my 21st on the Fulmar, excellent party!.
The Sulzer was an RSAD of which only a few, according to CE, were made and I think was 6 cylinder?. It had semi rotary exhaust valves, the seals of which were always needing replacement and were a pain.
The third was forever working on fuel valves and the evaporator rarely made water. AC, what AC! the ducting was there but the cold air was not.
The generators were Mirlees's the crank pins of which had gone oval so we had to run on both and also the Bellis & Morcom steam set.
Putting a generator on the board was a little disconcerting to begin with as it was an open switch board.
Nice runs though, with slow discharges and time in port and a drydock, Keppels, to finish with a stay in the Imperial which was OK, so good and bad.

Last edited by Andrew147; 16th April 2016 at 17:32.. Reason: AC
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 17th April 2016, 16:16
Malcolm Kirk Malcolm Kirk is offline  
Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Navigation
Active: 1961 - 1969
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 19
I was on her for almost all of 61 and a couple of months in 62.
When we broke down in the canal and anchored in Suez Bay they flew out a Sulzer factory lad and a Lloyds man.But I seem to remember the clearing of volves and the like. But she sounded well when running.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Air conditioning. Philthechill Brocklebank Line 20 18th August 2012 19:01
the mystery bank boat Ray Morgan AB Looking for Old Shipmates 17 28th January 2011 17:50
Birdy Boats, we loved you R.I.P. barnsey BP Shipping 106 9th November 2010 19:02



Support SN


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.1.0 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.