Mersey Ferries - Ships Nostalgia
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Mersey Ferries

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  #1  
Old 10th June 2017, 11:38
hallrobert955 hallrobert955 is offline  
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Mersey Ferries

Hi there
I am commissioning a model of a Mersey ferry.Either the Wallasey or the Marlowe.Iam looking for pictures of these especially on board pictures.Any help greatly appreciated.
Bob Hall

Last edited by hallrobert955; 10th June 2017 at 11:45.. Reason: name missed
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  #2  
Old 10th June 2017, 12:38
Barrie Youde Barrie Youde is offline  
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Dear Bob,

Am sorry that I have no photographs, but hope that the verse below might give some inspiration.

Good luck!

THE MERSEY FERRIES

The Ferries of the Mersey, nothing less and nothing more,
Were once the only normal way to reach the other shore.
To Eastham, to New Ferry, to Rock Ferry and Woodside,
To Seacombe and to Egremont a fleet of steamers plied:
And they were just the commonplace, the everyday commute,
The nuts and bolts of people of commercial institute.

But, long before our industry was galvanised by steam
There was a more erratic way to get across the stream.
There yet remains a slipway. Heaven knows how old it be,
From where the monks of Birkenhead would venture out to sea;
And gave the general public, for a modicum of groats,
A ferry-cross-the-Mersey service, blessed by Holy boats.

Would tide await for Mattins? Or would Mattins have to stay?
And, what was meant by “Service”? “All aboard” ? Or, “Let us pray”?
And, what was meant by “Holy”? Was it how a monk should live?
Or mediaeval spelling for “Resemblance to a sieve”?
How long would be the passage? Half an hour or half a week?
Could a ferry run to schedule in this wild and windy creek?

For the tide pre-dates the Priory. It rules by ebb and flow:
And, by the equal rule of God, there would be wind or no:
For, in the Mersey Estuary these rules apply by force:
For here is not a trickle stream; and wind shows small remorse:
Except, perhaps, some winter morn, befogged and full becalmed:
The stoutest-hearted sailor might then feel as though embalmed.

The holy Monks of Birkenhead were thus a hardy breed
Of mediaeval sailormen who catered for a need.
They risked their lives and limbs; and those of whom they live to serve.
That they should be remembered is the least they might deserve.
We know they served. We know they prayed. I wonder, did they dream?
Could any learned man improve the crossing of the stream?

In those pre-Reformation days, the likelihood seems not
That any holy man foresaw the genius of Watt.
The tides ran in, the tides ran out. The aeons ticked away.
The priory had long-since closed. At last, there dawned the day-
When horsemen on the riverbank stood tall, above their saddles,
To see - before their very eyes – a steamboat, driving paddles!

The steamer was the prototype of many more to follow,
Whose speed and regularity drew likeness with Apollo.
Their very introduction marked a step in evolution:
And let the Town of Liverpool expand its distribution.
Victoria Regina had not long known Coronation,
When dormitory in Wirral met the seeds of its creation.

And, thus, the local ferry service grew o match the age:
Each township on the Wirral shore installed a landing-stage.
The mansions of Rock ferry soon reflected man’s ambition,
As Empire knew expansion and a lead in competition.
The ferries crossed and crossed again, brought Merseyside alive:
And, just as Liverpool grew rich, the ferries too would thrive.

The ferry up to Eastham was the furthest call inland,
With landing-stage at Eastham Woods; hotel ornate and grand.
And, grander still, New Brighton at the seamost ferry end;
A fine resort, where all could sport their hard-earned cash and spend.
While, in between, were places one could cross by shorter way;
Woodside and Seacombe foremost, as they served the working day.

They saw the Port of Liverpool achieve its highest peak,
As thousands and more thousands made the crossing, every week.
Those silent, solid ferry-steamers rolled but would not rattle;
Their fortified construction soon would prove their worth in battle:
For, two were requisitioned, for the Raid upon Zebrugge,
The day when Lloyd George ordered them, “Go! Bash the Bosch, the bugger!”

The Daffodil and Iris, for their daring actions loyal,
Were handsomely rewarded by the nomination, “Royal”.
Returning to their peace-time duties, trade was brisk and steady.
Their sisters shared the accolade – reliable and ready.
For fish and chip New Brighton run or everyday employment,
For those who wished to travel, ‘twas the acme of enjoyment.

Has mankind now outpaced itself? The river rove by tunnels?
Does anybody care a fig to see a ferry’s funnels?
Commuters all now travel in their noisy, four-wheeled boxes;
And dart into the tunnels, aping terriers after foxes.
Should Merseysiders see the day when ferries are forgot,
‘Twould be fitting if, like foxes, we should then perhaps be shot.

BY
2002
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  #3  
Old 11th June 2017, 11:35
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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If they signed on and off every trip they`d fill their book before lunchtime Quote Alan Wardle Electrician m.v.Owerri
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  #4  
Old 14th June 2017, 22:10
eddyw eddyw is offline  
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Photo of "Marlowe" here:
https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/galler...arlowe/cat/528
Dundee Archives may have copies of plans.
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  #5  
Old 15th July 2017, 11:14
hallrobert955 hallrobert955 is offline  
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Marlowe

Eddy
Thanks for your help.I have been in touch with Dundee.I really need on board pictures though.
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  #6  
Old 15th July 2017, 13:16
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Stephen J. Card Stephen J. Card is offline  
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Remember the WOODSIDE? She left the Mersey in the 1930s and came out to Bermuda as a passenger tender to liners anchoring in Great Sound, Grassy Bay or Five Fathom Hole; too deep to come alongside. In the 50s she had a fire and sank up at the Dockyard. I remember seeing part of the wreck (underwater), but as far as I know the remains were broken up. Too young to remember! Here is a photo of her in 1937.

Also a photo of the Bermuda tender CANIMA (1000 pax). She was the former Cork tender BLARNA- BLARNEY (she wore both names on her sides). CAMIMA was built in Dublin but definitely those plans were based on the Mersey boats. Also a photo of BLARNA when as new. A fine looking vessel and very stylish. Better looking than the 'Royals'. Also a photo of CANIMA alongside Home Line's HOMERIC. Nothing better than riding the tender for runs out to the ship. Good fun!

CANIMA had the Bermuda crest on the sides of the funnel, as Cork crest when as BLARNA. It did not last and could not kept up as too costly to repaint. As Harbour Master I had the skipper to paint a wide band on the top of the funnel... almost like Bank Line! Also added a buff strip around the hull.

Stephen
Attached Images
File Type: jpg WOODSIDE Jan 1937.jpg (111.7 KB, 25 views)
File Type: jpg CANIMA sml.jpg (114.0 KB, 30 views)
File Type: jpg CANIMA.jpg (65.4 KB, 28 views)
File Type: jpg Homeric Bow Bermuda alongside SB from photo CANIMA.jpg (200.9 KB, 22 views)
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  #7  
Old 6th September 2017, 17:21
Purser52 Purser52 is offline  
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Anyone know what happened to Canima? I recall arriving at (then) HMS Malabar (the UK Naval Base in Bermuda) in an RFA in the late 80s and she was moored ahead of us. If memory serves she was superbly maintained with beautifully polished brass visible to inquisitive onlookers from the quayside. She must have been a sister ship to Cill Airne which was another Irish ship modeled on the Mersey Ferries - still a restaurant on the Liffey I think.
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  #8  
Old 6th September 2017, 18:45
eddyw eddyw is offline  
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History here: http://shipfax.blogspot.co.uk/2012/1...on-bottom.html
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  #9  
Old 6th September 2017, 20:32
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Stephen J. Card Stephen J. Card is offline  
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MARLOWE. Just say this rather exciting photo of MARLOWE c. 1930.

Barry,

It seems that most of the Mersey ferries seem to twin screw vessels. Did they use paddlers in the beginning and switch to screws... or for a special reason to prefer screws?

Stephen
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File Type: jpg Mersey_Ferry_1930s MARLOWE.jpg (130.6 KB, 16 views)
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  #10  
Old 6th September 2017, 21:54
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woodend woodend is offline  
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Great one Barrie you have outdone yourself this time. Remember well all the businessmen walking the decks round and round always te same way irrespective of tide (side to). They really got p....d off if you trie\d to walk the opposite way.
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  #11  
Old 6th September 2017, 22:37
Barrie Youde Barrie Youde is offline  
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#9 and #10

Thank you, chaps.

Not even I am old enough to recall paddle-driven ferries, but their existence in the great scheme of things is well documented.

As to promenading around the top deck, the rule as observed by the office workers (under pain of social ostracism if in breach) was : Walk around the top deck anti-clock wise. The state of tide was irrellevant. Newspapers were to be kep rolled-up and tucked under the left arm. Umbrellas, in the right hand, were to be used as walking sticks.
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  #12  
Old 7th September 2017, 21:41
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Samsette Samsette is offline  
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The fiddley grating was the place for me during wintertime, on the Woodside run. Steam, oil and warmth. Ah, Bisto!
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  #13  
Old 7th September 2017, 22:13
Barrie Youde Barrie Youde is offline  
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#12

Bisto, indeed, Samsette!

As a boy in short trousers taking the ferry to school, summer and winter in the 1950s, the fiddley grating was a magic place! To look down and see the engineers answering the telegraph ("Clang! Clang!") created a sense that all was right with the world, when the next thing would be slam/bump alongside, mooring ropes out, gangway-door rolled open and rattle-rattle, down would be lowered the gangway on its chains. The world would then disembark across the gangay (having patiently waited beyond the brass strips screwed into the deck) and then go about its business, leaving me to grow up, which I am still waiting to do!
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  #14  
Old 8th September 2017, 09:50
davidrwarwick davidrwarwick is offline  
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Sorry no onboard pictures but this might be of some use .


Also there where models of all the ferries at Seacombe Ferry terminal up until it was modernised, I believe they where transferred to
a) The Williamson Art Gallery, Slatey Rd, Birkenhead. CH43 4UE
b) Wallasey Central Library, Earlston Rd, Wallasey. CH45 5DX

It might be worth contacting them to see if they can help you.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Marlowe.jpg (22.4 KB, 13 views)
File Type: jpg Wallasey.jpg (21.3 KB, 11 views)

Last edited by davidrwarwick; 8th September 2017 at 10:19..
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