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What goes on in the Galley.

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  #51  
Old 25th July 2009, 08:23
jim morris jim morris is offline  
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JamesM View Post
Similar story about Catering Staff, but not involving food, thank goodness.
One day,whilst serving on British Severn, the Cat/Off asks me if the Engineers have much crockery/cutlery in the control room that has'nt been returned after they've had a meal.His reason for asking is that he's running very low on said items and he can't find out where they've gone. I tell him I don't think so, but I'll check. That afternoon I mention the topic to the 3/E only to be told that he think he has the answer. Apparently a couple of mornings ago after coming off the 12-4 he was making a cup of coffee in the pantry when the 2nd Stwd came in, took one look at the sink which had a pile of used crockery/cutlery soaking in soapy water, pulled out the plug, got a tray and lifted the contents of the sink onto it, stepped out onto the deck and chucked the lot over the wall, muttering " If they think I'm going to wash that lot they can get stuffed".(When interviewed later he admitted to doing this on a regular basis.)
So there you have it, the mystery of the vanishing crockery has been solved ---- it's all in Davy Jones' Locker!!(or on his table more like)
I done my first trip to sea as a boy rating on the Oronsay in 1956. 6 youngsters in the cabin. Any crockery or silverware that found it's way into the cabin always went through the porthole. Someone did say "if you drained the sea you could walk from England to Australia on crockery and silverware without getting your feet muddy"
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  #52  
Old 22nd August 2009, 15:48
edcasey edcasey is offline  
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i used to see lykes vessels in glasgow in late fifties,i always thought they would have better food than british ships, similar to u.s. army "eat as much as you want" etc. i am surprised about quality of food considering lykes were food importers, and that the sealift command food was bad. another myth exposed. how was the accomadation?wages? compered to british ships.was booze and tobacco dirt cheap? look forward to your reply..... edcasey
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  #53  
Old 22nd August 2009, 16:48
surfaceblow surfaceblow is offline  
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I sailed on the Shirley Lykes in the mid 70's and on Sealift Vessels in the mid 80's. On the accommodations the Lykes Brother ships complied with the regulations of 120 square feet of space and I had my own head since I was put in the spare Third Assistant Engineer's Room. On the Sealift vessels the rooms were on the small side you could not open the drawers under the bunk with the desk chair at the desk and you shared the head with the adjoining room.

The wages were union scale for both Lykes and MSC. While I was on the Lykes ship I was paid $ 6.67 a day for being a Apprentice Engineer. On the MSC vessels I was 1 Assistant Engineer and was paid $ 178 - 214 per day which was based on a power tonnage of the vessel. MSC was short on vacation. The vacation at the time I was working for them was based on how many years you worked for them. At the start it was two weeks vacation and then time off for weekends at sea.

The tobacco was cheap $ 2.50 a carton. No booze.

The 12 passengers seem to enjoy the food on the Lykes Brothers ship but I found that the food was far to greasy for me and I did not like the Southern Style cooking. Every day there was red beans and rice. The MSC ships the food was void of any spices while being cooked. But you could add all of the disguises you wanted. (A1, HP, etc).
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  #54  
Old 29th August 2009, 11:08
Jim Yates Jim Yates is offline  
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Goddards Plate Powder. Tin Foil from Tea Chests and Soda for Silver cleaning
Galley inspections.Make sure you cage all the cockroaches first. Many a Late arriving Pasenger/Officer/Cadet has enjoyed a special meal from ships i have sailed on
Jim
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  #55  
Old 7th December 2009, 20:40
bluestar boy stiff bluestar boy stiff is offline  
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Cool Egon Ronies The lot of Em

Quote:
Originally Posted by Macphail View Post
The Captain complained many times about his tough steak, sent it back, the cook threw it on the galley floor, stamped on it a lot, brushed it down, heated it up, applied a nice sauce, happy Captain.
Chief Engineer treated his steward like S**it, chicken curry, he had only bones, the rest had meat.
We have all had the half cockie in the stew, where is the other half.
How many bogies in the soup.
The Captain and Chief Engineer had an extended lunch time G &T, came down for late lunch, all gone, the cook had thrown everything overboard including his pots and pans.

Tell us about the Galley.
Who do they think they are Captains & Chief Engineers. They think they can do better cept moaning all the time. It's not the Chief Cooks fault if the meat he got from the chandler is tough, i bet they don't moan when the MRS serves em up some thing ropey.Have some thought for the poor old chief cook taking crap all day,sweating his plums off to get some a--hole moaning my mum dont make it like that (the chief cooks Quote ON HERE I'M YOUR MUVVA DEAR NOW PEE OFF AND LEAVE ME ALONE I GOT A HANG OVER)
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  #56  
Old 8th December 2009, 19:06
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It was always said in the Royal Navy that there was no bodily fluid that unpopular officers had not ingested .....!

Jack
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  #57  
Old 13th December 2009, 12:12
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Same in the MERCH I bet
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  #58  
Old 7th February 2010, 20:33
stevie wonder stevie wonder is offline  
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if you all think that playing around with peoples food is funny then I can only feel sorry for you, I trained as a chef and went to sea as a cook,cook/steward, ass. cook and after 12 years left to buy my first pub, sold that for three times what I paid and repeated that another three times.
I never allowed any stupid pranks in my kitchen or galley, and the name I got was stevie wonder, as a compliment and not as an insult
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  #59  
Old 8th February 2010, 10:23
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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Well said, Stevie, I don't agree with applauding infantile behaviour either. From time to time we all had to put up with bumptious superiors - that's life.

John T.
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  #60  
Old 8th February 2010, 11:40
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The food on the Rangitane was pretty good most of the time. However I dread to think what really went on down there in the galley. Looking back I suffered at the hands of the catering staff a couple of times. I still reckon that some of them were better off back on the back streets of the East End.
However........
During my days on Durham there was a serious incident. On my first voyage in 1957 a lot of apprentices suffered from boils. In fact the whole crew were often sick.
The next voyage after a severe storm in the Atlantic we finished up in Galveston Texas with two broken crankshafts in the main engines. The story is on the Rakaia site.
A new Capt took over.......Capt Keith Barnett one of the best Masters I ever had the honour of sailing with....and he was doing his rounds in Galveston. In the galley he noticed a large pipe crossing the galley stove with a dark mark on a flange. As he watched as a drip fell into the stew pot that was bubbling on the stove. Turning to the C/E who had been on the ship for many years he asked what the pipeline was.
On checking it was found to be the officers sewer line.
The infections stopped promptly.
On Northumberland shortly after joining the cook was seen boiling eggs in the soup.
A quick flight home and the 2nd Cook was promoted. Never had a sick day on her from then on. I still have very reserved opinions of some of the people that were hired as "stewards" in those days. By no means the majority however there were some who really were beyond reason. We even had a murder on the way out to New Zealand on one voyage. Never proven however some of us up "top" had our suspicions.
It was all a very long time ago however the vast majority were great folk and wonderful characters. I never want to sail on passenger ships again however.........even as a passenger.

Last edited by Mike S; 9th February 2010 at 01:43..
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  #61  
Old 8th February 2010, 20:32
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I have a photo of the Rangitane galley some years later (1973) as the Oriental Esmerelda:
https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/galler...hp/photo/50804
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  #62  
Old 9th February 2010, 01:45
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Phew!
It was a lot cleaner than that I can tell you!!!! It gleamed when they had finished burnishing all the pots.
It was what happened after it left the cooks that used to worry me.
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  #63  
Old 11th February 2010, 05:30
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Rangitane's Galley looks a bit overcrowded there but it's the same galley that I used to pass through on my way from the refrigeration engine room to the engineers pantry at the end of the 12 to 4 am watch.arming myself with a big basket of hot freshly baked "Crescent" bread rolls straight out of the baker's oven as I went.
It was my job to make sure that our after watch beer was super cold from the brine room after storing it there to avoid the previous 8 to 12 watch from over imbibing.
These rolls went down well with the watch-end beer and cheese and the bridge watch keepers used to come down for a snack and a tipple as well.

Bob
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Last edited by spongebob; 11th February 2010 at 05:35..
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  #64  
Old 13th February 2010, 11:14
ALAN TYLER ALAN TYLER is offline  
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Hard Soap

Changing the thread a bit here but can any other old galley boys remember the hard soap, for doing the "strap-up". We used to cut it up into pieces and put it in a tin with holes cut in the bottom and hang it from the taps so as to let the water run through it. This would provide you with a good "sudsy" water for about 10 seconds, after that the grease levels would appear round your elbows!!! Happy Days...
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  #65  
Old 13th February 2010, 19:57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ALAN TYLER View Post
Changing the thread a bit here but can any other old galley boys remember the hard soap, for doing the "strap-up". We used to cut it up into pieces and put it in a tin with holes cut in the bottom and hang it from the taps so as to let the water run through it. This would provide you with a good "sudsy" water for about 10 seconds, after that the grease levels would appear round your elbows!!! Happy Days...
Was it not:-

Yellow Block - fairy
Red Block - Carbolic
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  #66  
Old 14th February 2010, 12:06
ALAN TYLER ALAN TYLER is offline  
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Originally Posted by Burned Toast View Post
Was it not:-

Yellow Block - fairy
Red Block - Carbolic
Then came Teepol if you were lucky....measured out by the thimble full and probably watered down!!!! Happy days
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  #67  
Old 14th February 2010, 12:51
David W David W is offline  
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The soap melted quicker, as did your hands, if your galley had a "live steam" pipe, instead of a hot water tap.

Teepol !!, wasnt that an empty can, that appeared just prior to the Captain's inspection.

What about Board of Trade lime juice, it seared the throat and bought tears to the eyes of anyone daft enough to try it, except old time firemen and trimmers, but what a lovely job it did on the galley bench.
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  #68  
Old 14th February 2010, 19:16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ALAN TYLER View Post
Then came Teepol if you were lucky....measured out by the thimble full and probably watered down!!!! Happy days
Then there was the 5 gallon drum of Carbolacene,which was a thick gooey liquid .The drum just sat in the store and never seemed to get used.Supposed to be a type of disinfectant.
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  #69  
Old 15th February 2010, 20:28
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Talking about harsh soaps, does anyone recall Solvol soap.
This abrasive hand soap was first produced in 1905 by a Melbourne Company and is still marketed by the WD-40 Co,
More for engineers than the galley crew I guess.

Bob
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  #70  
Old 1st August 2010, 19:58
Jim Sutton Jim Sutton is offline  
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It is rather amusing that any of us from the US who have posted anything on this forum have groused about Lykes food. From my "pet weevil farm" (a package of saltines that had a weevils living in it not unlike an ant farm) on the Mayo Lykes to other atrocities such as freezer burned dixie cups of ice cream to tripe,tripe and more tripe! On the CHARLOTTE LYKES (the ex WESER EXPRESS) the Chief and I decided to make a box raid late one night. The horsecock for the night lunch was indeed Lykes and came in the same tins that Lincoln put their welding rods! The Chief exclaimed "Hey Jim I found the olive loaf" to which my reply was "Bad news Chief I have the olive loaf which has some red pimento in it!" Turns out the Chief had found some ham with a bit of "age" out it. Soom some splashing noises were heard in the dark!
I was on one Lykes ship which was a really good feeder and that was the LYRA perhaps because she had a west coast steward's departmentalso,the messman(woman) made homemade salad dressings and we ate pretty well! AND she had the lowest feeding budget in the fleet. . .go figure.
By the way Kraft Cheese Whiz makes an excellent substiture for Permatex!
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  #71  
Old 1st August 2010, 21:46
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Had no complaints about P&O food on either liner or cargoe ship but dined exceptionally well on Stratheden.The chef was uncle of my mate & the 2nd chef a fellow NZer. KIWI
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  #72  
Old 9th August 2010, 19:44
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BarnacleGrim BarnacleGrim is offline  
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An AB would, in a spell of mysophobia, cut several slices of cheese and putting them aside before daring to put one on the sandwich. The mate commented that he wished someone would just come along and bell-end the lot.
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  #73  
Old 9th August 2010, 21:44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dickyboy View Post
Was anyone ever a ships cook on the passenger boats?
As I recall the Andes and the Capetown Castle had Crews Galleys. On one of them at least, it was under the Focstle. One was open onto the well deck. Pretty exposed when collecting the grub for the mess. Pretty chilly for the cooks, hot on one side, and cold due the exposed position of the galley, on the other. Don't remember the food being too bad though. But compared with what the passengers were getting............
Dickyboy,
I was in that Andes and I recall the crew galley being right under the focsle. As you say, the food wasn't too bad. The big messroom at the forard end of the well deck doubled as a crew cinema a couple of nights a week. The problem was there was only one film... Goldfinger, and we had seen it that often we all knew the script, and the crowd would take it in turns to be characters in the movie. So you would have eight or nine ABs yelling out Sean Connery's lines, and twenty odd stewards pretending to be Pussy Galore!
Everyone seemed to be pissed 24/7 on that ship.
Some old characters had been in her since new, and had no intention of ever leaving.
Regards,
Pat
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  #74  
Old 11th August 2010, 22:04
cookietwo cookietwo is offline  
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it is alright complaining about mates engineers and deckies but woh betide any catering member who got up the cookies back when it came to eating
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  #75  
Old 13th August 2010, 18:37
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AB pokes his head into galley and shouts "Ha Ha, who s--t in the cooks boot then"? Cook shouts after him "Ha Ha, and who had it in their soup then" ?
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