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  #26  
Old 22nd April 2020, 20:50
Bill Morrison Bill Morrison is offline  
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Kempton Park Steam Engine

I saw a programme some years back about this set up and have found a link on YouTube. If you live in the London area, when hopefully things return to a semblance of normal it would be worth visiting.

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  #27  
Old 22nd April 2020, 21:21
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spongebob spongebob is offline
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Thanks for that Bill, if I ever get to London again I would check that out .

Bob
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  #28  
Old 22nd April 2020, 23:05
Graham Wallace Graham Wallace is offline  
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Fabulous photos.

My first ship 1958) as a BP Marine Engineering Apprentice was a Doxford diesel with only one steam driven Engineroom jenny. Chief decide to reclaim leaking bunkers from a already partially flooded cofferdam- result total shutdown, water in all fuel lines, had to burn all and any wood in the Scotch boilers to keep Jenny running, what a shambles.

I only sailed steam vessels after that, left BP and sea in 1962 with a lowly Second's Steam Cert, no too sure how I passed with all those blasted triple expansion questions, lap/lead etc,etc.

Great memories

Graham

23 April; Looking back at my original posting I realised it was a real understatement. I had completed my Marine Engineering Apprenticeship with BP Tanker Co, served over my required seatime, sat my MOT Part B examination and passed. At 22 I was licenced with a Second's Steam Certificate, the world my oyster. Fifteen more months seatime, one more exam and I could have a Chief's ticket, unfortunately not to be, I had to leave the sea. Then four years of night school, AMI Mech E, MI Mech E, C Eng, Canadian PEng. A practical Engineer.... a Tribute to my time in the British Merchant Navy. In a few weeks I start my 82 year, I would not change anything, well maybe sail a triple expansion.
Graham

Last edited by Graham Wallace; 23rd April 2020 at 22:43..
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  #29  
Old 23rd April 2020, 09:51
sternchallis sternchallis is offline
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I can under stand Graham understanding Lap & Lead on steam engines, as an apprentice the old fitters would show you and it was like black magic at that age, setting tappets on a diesel I could understand.

Ref: Spongebob 24, Danic 25, yes I was under the impression that a Chief's Motor or Steam was the chance of a decent job ashore.

By the time I was looking for work in England a Degree in anything be it needlework seemed to be par for the course. Bosses that had come through uni and employment agencies had never heard of the Merchant Navy because at that point we didn't have one. IMarEng never registered with them either. It may have been different in ports but not inland.
The same happened with Class. Lloyds decided they wanted Graduates , so they recruited all these graduates, showed them a boiler and told them to crawl through that and survey it or jump into an oily dripping crankcase and it just wasn't in their DNA, they didn't have a clue what they were looking at and no experience to make a decision on a condition.

Eventually Lloyds realised their mistake but then that decade during and after the demise of the MN and available Engineers had already found alternative employment.
If it took say 10 years to train a Chief Engineer and make sure he had the required broad experience of many different engines, machinery and boilers,
and could make correct decisions based on theory and practice, shadowing an experienced surveyor for 6 months is no substitute for 10 years on the job experience.
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  #30  
Old 23rd April 2020, 19:13
sternchallis sternchallis is offline
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PS Waverley gets new boilers

http://mstat230.co.uk/service.php?s=...4600004d872143

They must have been hard to source in England, I don't think we make steam boilers any more. Robey, B& E , Hartley & Sugden have probably long gone, and not sure about NEI either.
To say we led the world in Steam Boilers and Engines. I believe Spain still builds boilers but are not so good. Might be CE stamped, but thats not worth a lot today, unlike BS ???? ( used to know it, but long gone).
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  #31  
Old 23rd April 2020, 21:01
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spongebob spongebob is offline
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Britain was strewn with fire tube boiler makers in the early sixties , Danks of Netherton, Edwin Danks of Oldbury, Cochrane of Annan, Robey of Lincoln, Spencer , Bonecourt & Clarkson , John Thompson , Allen Ignis , are some that comes to mind .
By the time I retired in 1994 Babcock had acquired Edwin Danks , Robey, SBC, and Allen Ignis under the mantle of Babcock Packaged Boilers while B&W had become a mere shadow of its former self .
Some of the money for such acquisitions came from selling the wholly owned Babcock Germany to the then Shah of Persia who craved ownership of fuel gobbling industries.
Names like Babcock -Hitachi , Mitsubishi , etc horned in and little remains in Britain I believe .

Bob
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  #32  
Old 23rd April 2020, 22:20
sternchallis sternchallis is offline
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I, yes remember Alln Ignis now, reverse flame boilers small package jobs for heating or steam for small laundries.
Thanks for that Bob, brough back a few names that had gone into the mists of time.
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  #33  
Old 23rd April 2020, 22:23
dannic dannic is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spongebob View Post
Britain was strewn with fire tube boiler makers in the early sixties , Danks of Netherton, Edwin Danks of Oldbury, Cochrane of Annan, Robey of Lincoln, Spencer , Bonecourt & Clarkson , John Thompson , Allen Ignis , are some that comes to mind .
By the time I retired in 1994 Babcock had acquired Edwin Danks , Robey, SBC, and Allen Ignis under the mantle of Babcock Packaged Boilers while B&W had become a mere shadow of its former self .
Some of the money for such acquisitions came from selling the wholly owned Babcock Germany to the then Shah of Persia who craved ownership of fuel gobbling industries.
Names like Babcock -Hitachi , Mitsubishi , etc horned in and little remains in Britain I believe .

Bob
Cochran still going strong, just fitted two new boilers in paddle steamer Waverley. Make lots for glasshouses, factories etc.

Dannic.
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  #34  
Old 24th April 2020, 13:42
loco loco is offline
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There are still a number of boiler makers in the UK, albeit probably relatively small; they supply the traction engine and steam railways with replacement or repair boilers.

The boiler for the A1 'Tornado' was made in a former East German railway workshop, as B12/3 8572 at the North Norfolk railway. I think at least one other new build steam locomotive group are also looking to get their boiler from there.
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  #35  
Old 11th May 2020, 21:45
sternchallis sternchallis is offline
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Sulzer 1915 horizontal steam engine driving a paddle wheeler.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/6261...7318379950132/

Works if you are not on facebook as well.

Poetry in motion.
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  #36  
Old 17th May 2020, 10:32
Chillytoes Chillytoes is offline  
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Loco
Keep away from that old East German mob. The boiler they built for the Australian engine, 3801, was a disaster in every possible way. Nothing fitted, nothing was straight, nothing could be sealed nothing lined up, etc etc etc. Look it up.
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  #37  
Old 17th May 2020, 23:43
dannic dannic is offline  
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Didn't Fred Dibnah the steeplejack retube his traction engine himself? Have his autobiography somewhere so will have to have a look
Dannic
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