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  #1  
Old 18th November 2015, 17:22
double acting double acting is offline  
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Menu translation

When I joined Union Castle in 1958 I was issued with a couple of sheets of A4 on which culinary terms were "translated" into English. If it said Florentine it had spinach. A Weiner Schnitzel was a veal cutlet, if the thing was Holstein it meant it had a fried egg on top, etc etc

This was to prevent staff from cargo boats starving to death in mail boat dining saloons.

Does anyone have a copy of this document? If so could you put it on line as a JPEG ?
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  #2  
Old 18th November 2015, 17:42
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John Rogers John Rogers is offline  
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The Weiner Schnitzel is one of my favorite meals ,the wife makes for me, not forgetting the Jagger Schnitzel, that's the one with the brown gravy.
Since we don't get a lot a veal in my area we use pork.

Sorry I cant help you with the document.
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  #3  
Old 18th November 2015, 18:47
Barrie Youde Barrie Youde is offline  
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Kromeskies a la Russe
Sweetbreads
Baked Alaska
Duchesse Potatoes
Hake Portugaise
Sauteed Potatoes
Petit Fours
Norfolk Turkey
Wiltshire Bacon
Wiltshire Ham
Wiltshire Gammon
Rognons de veaux
Consomme Royale
Brown Windsor Soup
Turbot Mornay
Nasi Goerang
Cotelets de Porc
Petit Pois
All of these delicacies and wonderments were completely unknown to me on joining Blue Flue at the age of 16. Turkey, pork, bacon, ham, and gammon I knew very well, but not by county. Quel introduction! Most of them I didn’t hear again, anywhere else, for about ten years.
Vividly I recall being introduced to a courgette in 1968 when I was aged 25.
Funnily enough, I don’t recall (in Blue Flue) any specialities as to beef or lamb. There must surely have been some?

PS I do remember Lancashire Hot-Pot - and everybody said, "Oh! Christ!"

Last edited by Barrie Youde; 18th November 2015 at 18:53..
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  #4  
Old 18th November 2015, 19:50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barrie Youde View Post
Kromeskies a la Russe
Sweetbreads
Baked Alaska
Duchesse Potatoes
Hake Portugaise
Sauteed Potatoes
Petit Fours
Norfolk Turkey
Wiltshire Bacon
Wiltshire Ham
Wiltshire Gammon
Rognons de veaux
Consomme Royale
Brown Windsor Soup
Turbot Mornay
Nasi Goerang
Cotelets de Porc
Petit Pois
All of these delicacies and wonderments were completely unknown to me on joining Blue Flue at the age of 16. Turkey, pork, bacon, ham, and gammon I knew very well, but not by county. Quel introduction! Most of them I didnít hear again, anywhere else, for about ten years.
Vividly I recall being introduced to a courgette in 1968 when I was aged 25.
Funnily enough, I donít recall (in Blue Flue) any specialities as to beef or lamb. There must surely have been some?

PS I do remember Lancashire Hot-Pot - and everybody said, "Oh! Christ!"

Oxtails was a staple in the sailor's mess, as was corned beef hash. Not forgetting curried beef, which we often got as an entree, and which was universally known as "Mad Woman's Sh1te".
I have seen on saloon menus in BF, such items as Beef Stroganoff, Tournedos Rossini, and Beef Bourguignon, but these exotic dishes never made their way into the sailor's messroom.
Blue Funnel was notorious for feeding us pork. We got roast pork at least three times a week, and pork chop once or twice. Touted as a cure for seasickness, I can personally refute that!
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  #5  
Old 18th November 2015, 20:38
Barrie Youde Barrie Youde is offline  
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Thank you, Pat.

Now that you mention it I do remember Bouef Bourgignon, Beef Strog and Spag Bol, and perhaps even Gigot d'agneau an Epaule d'agneau - and am very grateful for it!

Le poulet (or l'oiseau mort) was usually as vulcanised rubber - and I don't recall it with the same affection at all.

Best of all, though, surely, were tabnabs at mid-afternoon, in any shape or form! Even today, a cup of tea at 1600 hrs is not complete unless there is a tabnab of some kind therewith!

Coffee? Aged 16 I had not graduated to coffee; and the aroma (as of Coopers on the corner of Whitechapel/ Paradise Street) in heavy weather was the only thing which made me seasick - and, yes, it did. I did not graduate into coffee until the age of about 19 - and the later experiences of all the coffees of Europe (all imported hereto) have become a delight!

Magic!
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  #6  
Old 18th November 2015, 20:50
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There was also a beef dish often served in Blueys, which was a roast joint with carrots inserted into it at some stage in the cooking process.
No doubt there is a high faluting name for this concoction but I dont recall it.
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  #7  
Old 18th November 2015, 21:01
Barrie Youde Barrie Youde is offline  
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Carrots inserted into beef? That must be silverside, surely?
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  #8  
Old 18th November 2015, 22:25
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pat Kennedy View Post
There was also a beef dish often served in Blueys, which was a roast joint with carrots inserted into it at some stage in the cooking process.
No doubt there is a high faluting name for this concoction but I dont recall it.
Beef a la mode.

John T

PS it must have been tough on the cooks having to make two lots of food, one for officers and one for crew. Not very economical either.

Last edited by trotterdotpom; 18th November 2015 at 22:29..
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  #9  
Old 18th November 2015, 22:54
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In my early days on a coaster one meal we were always served was "Schooner On The Rocks" a pork roast in a pan surrounded with spuds, carrots, and onions, the Veggies were cooked in the fat from the pork.
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  #10  
Old 19th November 2015, 02:31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pat Kennedy View Post
There was also a beef dish often served in Blueys, which was a roast joint with carrots inserted into it at some stage in the cooking process.
No doubt there is a high faluting name for this concoction but I dont recall it.
This dish was served regularly on board "Rangitane" and was based on a piece of roast topside. The joint was stabbed with a sharp tapered knife and the cut cavities stuffed with carrot, parsnip and the like before roasting.
When served as a sliced cold cut the rings of vegetable looked rather attractive and inviting for most but my first sampling saw me remark "this cow has not chewed its cud properly".
I was called a native savage or similar by at least one in the engineers mess whose stomach was a little delicate at sea.

Bob
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  #11  
Old 19th November 2015, 05:40
kauvaka kauvaka is offline  
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Having grown up postwar on porridge for breakfast I thought BP's "Rolled oats" would be a pleasant change. Yeah, right!
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  #12  
Old 19th November 2015, 07:03
tiachapman tiachapman is offline  
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with a c/h steward a few times know didnt known as mince and dumplings.

didnt know up to then there were so many ways to serve up mince
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  #13  
Old 19th November 2015, 07:16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tiachapman View Post
with a c/h steward a few times know didnt known as mince and dumplings.

didnt know up to then there were so many ways to serve up mince
His name wasn't Len (something) was it? From Newcastle?
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  #14  
Old 19th November 2015, 08:45
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It was Oxtail Jardiniere I did not like much. Never eaten it before or since. Someone told me it was a delicacy in some parts of the world but not in my house.
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  #15  
Old 19th November 2015, 09:06
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Was E.D.'s the only company whose passenger ships navigated by the menu. Being a 'local lad' my wife used to join us at the Landing Stage each voyage after tie up and come round to the dock with us. Still tells the story that it was rhe same menu on docking day.......lamb chops for lunch.
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  #16  
Old 19th November 2015, 09:18
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Originally Posted by Tony Selman View Post
It was Oxtail Jardiniere I did not like much. Never eaten it before or since. Someone told me it was a delicacy in some parts of the world but not in my house.
Have never touched it since I came ashore!
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  #17  
Old 19th November 2015, 09:46
Kanbe Kanbe is offline  
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Before the war of 1967 I understand that it was traditional to serve Sausage Rolls during the night of the Suez Canal transit. One bite just did not reach the filling, the second you had past it seemed to be the consensus of opinion.
There was also the Elders Chief Steward who joined every ship with the voyage menus already worked out - Seven breakfasts, seven lunches and seven dinners i.e. one of each for each day of the week.
Kanbe
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  #18  
Old 19th November 2015, 09:47
Kanbe Kanbe is offline  
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Sausage rolls refer to blueys

Kanbe
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  #19  
Old 19th November 2015, 11:06
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All,
In Hains Curried Beef always drew the comment "I see the Cook has lifted the meat room duck boards again", Brown Windsor soup, what was that?

Yours aye,

slick
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  #20  
Old 19th November 2015, 11:11
Barrie Youde Barrie Youde is offline  
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# 20

Brown Windsor was brown in colour, contents largely unknown!

Originally beef in some form, I'd guess.
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  #21  
Old 19th November 2015, 11:51
Kanbe Kanbe is offline  
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Brown Windsor soup - Gravy mark 2. Being gravy further diluted

Kanbe
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  #22  
Old 19th November 2015, 13:55
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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You lot never ate as well before you joined and a few of you haven`t since you left,what choice did your mum give you for breakfast? take it or leave it.My mum was an exceptional cook and could make what was available in the early 50`s go a long way supplemented,as was my nans table,by home preserved friit and vegetables from the garden. Even so when I joined the Accra I still didn`t know what half the stuff offered was and it certainly opened my eyes to how good food could be and why after 18 months I changed over to the catering department and loved it.
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  #23  
Old 19th November 2015, 14:17
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I do remember Lancashire Hot-Pot - and everybody said, "Oh! Christ!" - BY

More Grey Flue than Blue Flue, but this inevitably recalls an occasion in a frigate when Action Messing was under way, with the requirement to feed the entire ship's company of 270 within eight minutes. As the crew streamed through the junior rates' dining hall to exhortations from the Petty Officer Gunnery Instructor of "Eat it and beat it! Don't make a meal of it!", a young sailor asked the Petty Officer chef what the dumpling infested stew was. "Potmess, son", came the answer, but when the immediately following young officer asked the identical question about the identical dish, the answer was, "Boeuf a la mode, sir"!

Jack
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  #24  
Old 19th November 2015, 14:34
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Fyffes in the early sixties served some of the best food I've eaten; the experience possibly enhanced, as some have already mentioned, by applying exotic names to mundane dishes.
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  #25  
Old 19th November 2015, 17:33
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I really don't want to do anything to put a crimp on this thread and I hope it continues at length, I will be reading with interest, but the thread https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?t=3646 Has twenty + pages on this subject. Don't stop posting on here, but don't miss reading that long and fascinating thread.

My strongest memories of Blue Funnel breakfasts is of black pudding (very good) combined with the taste of a preserved then fried egg. Quite a distinctive taste, and I can summon it at will. Never quite as good since.

Another strange dish, Collops on toast (mince on toast) for breakfast. Loved it. I can't remember any food that I didn't like, and I was shamefully skinny, going from 32 inch chest to 44 inches after working on farms. Pound after pound of potatoes and the neccessity to carry sacks of grains up steps did it for me.
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