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  #1  
Old 28th November 2007, 22:05
wilf wilf is offline  
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containers

Forgive me for being a little naive but seeing the recent tv documentry on the massive container ship . Do the have anything in the holds below deck? They have hundreds of containers stacked on the deck but do they have to take them off to get to the hatches?.Also do they lock them to-gether because when I have carried 45' containers on my truck the locks are on the skeletal trailer... many thanks ..Alan
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  #2  
Old 28th November 2007, 23:34
sparkie2182 sparkie2182 is offline  
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yep.......... lots of boxes below.........some specialist ones (chilled/freezers) and so on.
all differing in weight. contents (some hazardous....some perishable ect)
and ports of discharge.

quite a complex business in cargohandling
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  #3  
Old 29th November 2007, 07:48
slick slick is offline  
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All,
... and Ballasting.
Yours aye,
Slick
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  #4  
Old 29th November 2007, 09:32
John Cassels John Cassels is offline  
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The stowage and securing of containers can vary with ship and classification
but basically is';
Underdeck containers are landed directly onto doubling plates on the tanktop
being lowered and held in place in cell guides. One has to be careful and stow
hazardous boxes by IMCO regs.
Deck containers are locked together with twistlocks to the corner castings -
similar as on your truck. The top tier may be secured with bridge fittings and
with wire or chain lashings to turnbuckles in order to secure the complete
stack as one block.

In a very basic nutshell.
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  #5  
Old 29th November 2007, 17:53
slick slick is offline  
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All,
I read somewhere that the Container was considered by some to be the 20th. Century's greatest non technical invention ? mmmmm.....
Yours aye,
Slick
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  #6  
Old 29th November 2007, 21:19
sparkie2182 sparkie2182 is offline  
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interestingly, i saw a documentary about the support given after d-day....
operation sea lion ...........to the troops on the beacheads and coastal regions of france.
in order to rationalise the carriage across the english channel of multivarious items required for such a massive uindertaking, standard sizes containers were used, and shipped across as per modern "box boats".

considering this was mid 1940s, and the logical concept of such transportation........ it is amazing it didnt carry immediately on into peacetime and thereby have the "container revolution" 30 years earlier.
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  #7  
Old 30th November 2007, 10:46
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MikeK MikeK is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sparkie2182 View Post
interestingly, i saw a documentary about the support given after d-day....
operation sea lion ...........to the troops on the beacheads and coastal regions of france.
in order to rationalise the carriage across the english channel of multivarious items required for such a massive uindertaking, standard sizes containers were used, and shipped across as per modern "box boats".

considering this was mid 1940s, and the logical concept of such transportation........ it is amazing it didnt carry immediately on into peacetime and thereby have the "container revolution" 30 years earlier.
Thank God it didn't as the M.N would have shrunk that much earlier, and chances are a lot of us would never had got a job !

Mike
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  #8  
Old 30th November 2007, 11:25
Sarky Cut Sarky Cut is offline  
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Containers

Hi Wilf.

They do say that a picture is worth a thousand words so here goes.
Explains all as they say.

http://i9.tinypic.com/8dxszuu.jpg

I hereby thank the person who posted this in the gallery, it has answered this very question many times.
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  #9  
Old 30th November 2007, 23:21
marine master marine master is offline
 
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Containers

Never sailed on a container ship so interested in their operation.1) Who does the lashing/securing. Shore or ship staff?.2) Are the plugs on reefers standard? if not must be a nightmare trying to get electrical supplies to them in the short turnaround times. 3) Do the bigger ships have dedicated electrical power supplies?
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Old 1st December 2007, 10:47
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Tony Morris Tony Morris is online now
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I sail at present on Hamburg Sud container vessels, the lashings are done by shore side, reefer plugs are all standard size so no problem there, ships do not have dedicated power supply for cargo but we do have 4 large generators so that we can supply the power for our normal load, bow thruster and up to 600 reefer containers
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  #11  
Old 26th March 2009, 19:17
Klaatu83 Klaatu83 is offline  
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To Marine Master:

The longshore "lashing gang" secures the containers to the deck. The ships' electricians were usually assigned the duty of plugging in all the reefer containers. However, it is up to the ship's officers to insure all the lashings are secure, and that all the reefers are running properly, before the ship sails. On a ship that has 20 hatches, with containers stowed 13 across, and carrying over 200 reefers, that can take a considerable amount of running around. If any of the reefers weren't working properly then it was up to the mates to point it out to the longshoremen, who then had either to fix them or remove them. If the mates didn't catch the bad reefers before sailing then the ship's crew had to fix them because the ship had become liable for any ruined cargo inside them.

Container ships normally have several built-in diesel generators aboard to provide both ships service power as well as power for the reefers. In addition some companies, such as Sealand, could provide additional diesel generators, mounted in cargo containers, that could be carried on deck to provide power on those occasions when we carried more reefers than the number reefer plugs available on the ship. during the Iraq War the port of Shuaiba, in Kuwait, didn't have enough shore plugs to handle the large number of reefers coming in, so we supplied the terminal with several of our generator-containers.

Nowadays the reefer plugs have been pretty much standardized because they have to be able to operate ashore in various terminals as well as on the ships. However, Farrell Lines used to go to many Med ports which lacked facilities to plug in reefer containers. As a result that company developed their own reefer containers that were powered by their own little built-in diesel generators. They worked well enough, except that the "natives" had a tendency to steal the fuel out of them!
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