Orlop Decks - Ships Nostalgia
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  #1  
Old 22nd May 2006, 14:28
cheddarnibbles cheddarnibbles is offline  
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Orlop Decks

This was an answer to a crossword clue recently encountered.
They were so very handy to use when loading tea 'options' in places like Trincomalee and Columbo.
Does anyone know if the Orlop deck was peculiar to Blue Funnel or did other companies have them as well ??
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  #2  
Old 22nd May 2006, 14:57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheddarnibbles
This was an answer to a crossword clue recently encountered.
They were so very handy to use when loading tea 'options' in places like Trincomalee and Columbo.
Does anyone know if the Orlop deck was peculiar to Blue Funnel or did other companies have them as well ??
Orlop decks were a usual feature of ships built by H&W, of course that depended on the type of ship. Not may orlop decks to be found on a submarine.
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  #3  
Old 22nd May 2006, 15:42
benjidog benjidog is offline
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According to "The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea" an orlop deck was originally the lowest deck in a sailing man-of-war where cables were coiled and anchors stored; also the deck where powder magazines and storerooms were found. Later it came to refer to the floors of cargo holds.

As I have seen none of the above at first hand, could you give us a bit more information about what you are referring to please to shine a torch into the abyss of my ignorance - I presume you two are not old enough to refer to the men-of-war (though I guess there are plenty of these where TMac comes from!).

Brian
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  #4  
Old 22nd May 2006, 16:21
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Orlop deck

I distinctly remember (wonder of wonders) when I was a deck boy on "Port Saint John" in the 40's, I saw the words 'orlop deck' chiselled into the bulkhead of a large storage hatch abaft #5 hatch. The deck was by no means the lowest in the ship though.
I do think that 'Orlop' had something to do with the position of the deck level such as main deck, 'tween deck, lower 'tween deck, etc.
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  #5  
Old 22nd May 2006, 16:27
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Orlop Decks

Brian

In pre-container days, there was a danger that crates and boxes in the lower hold could be crushed by the weight of other goods stowed above them. Orlop Decks were intermediate platforms designed to take the weight of the cargo stowed on them. In many ships they could be folded back, or removed to allow bulky items to be stowed on one leg of the voyage.

Fred
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  #6  
Old 22nd May 2006, 16:59
benjidog benjidog is offline
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Fred,

Thanks - that makes sense to me now and I can see the need for this in the days before containers.

I suppose the lowerable (if that is a word?) platforms they have on parts of some decks on car ferries to stow either one level of trucks or two levels of cars performs a similar function in allowing the best use of the holds as well - a sort of fold-away mezzanine floor.

Brian
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  #7  
Old 23rd May 2006, 13:56
cheddarnibbles cheddarnibbles is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by benjidog
Fred,

Thanks - that makes sense to me now and I can see the need for this in the days before containers.

I suppose the lowerable (if that is a word?) platforms they have on parts of some decks on car ferries to stow either one level of trucks or two levels of cars performs a similar function in allowing the best use of the holds as well - a sort of fold-away mezzanine floor.

Brian
Yes Brian, you are on the right track. However,the decks referred to were usually in the hatches immediately fore and aft of the centre castle of a standard A class Bluey or Glen Liner. Only about 10 feet headroom in them and, as mentioned, ideal when loading parcels of 'option' tea boxes with destinations stamped on for discharge at any of the ports listed on the boat note...say :- Port Said,Genoa,Avonmouth,Newport,Swansea,Liverpool,Ham burg,Amsterdam,Antwerp or London. Quite a headache for the Mate to load and for the wharfies to get out at the other end. !!!
On the other hand they were a pain in the rear for wharfies because they had another set of hatch covers to deal with before they could get at the lower holds.
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  #8  
Old 23rd May 2006, 21:17
jonsea jonsea is offline  
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. . . and if any other Old Worcesters are reading this, they will remember the Orlop deck - I think my bunk was on it, but I'll have to check my records on that.

Jon
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  #9  
Old 25th May 2006, 22:53
lakercapt lakercapt is offline  
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"Ashanti Palm" had orlop decks and I was told that this was because of the reqirement of the admirality that they could carry tanks etc in the event of war. I believe that the government subsidized the building.
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  #10  
Old 26th May 2006, 00:34
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dom

the royal mail boat deseardo had orlop decks,i think it was no.3 hatch,but it was a fridge deck
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  #11  
Old 26th May 2006, 17:09
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Marcus Cardew Marcus Cardew is offline  
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I remember Orlop Deck's on Brocklbank ships, as being an uppermost deck, above the 'tween deck, usually in #4 hatch just abaft the accomodation..
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  #12  
Old 27th May 2006, 09:47
dom dom is offline  
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dom

never having been on b/banks,i understood the orlop deck was the lowest deck?
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  #13  
Old 27th May 2006, 10:07
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Orlop deck=The fourth or lowest deck (Google)
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  #14  
Old 6th March 2007, 21:54
Hague Hague is offline
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Cheddarnibbles,
Guessing you are a West Country man and I read a Trident Tanker Man did you ever sail Peter Bishop (Taunton / Wiveliscombe??).
Brgds
Hague
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  #15  
Old 6th March 2007, 22:16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marcus Cardew View Post
I remember Orlop Deck's on Brocklbank ships, as being an uppermost deck, above the 'tween deck, usually in #4 hatch just abaft the accomodation..
Brocks older tonnage had a bridge space above the 'tween deck in No 3 hatch. On Malakand I understand it housed gunners' accommodation during the war.

Hatches 1 and 4 on the steam ships had orlop decks, the lower part of the hold were deep tanks. I never saw a liquid cargo carried in them, but a hazy memory from earlier last century had them ballasted. I would look to our longer serving members to comment further, I only did three trips after my apprenticeship before being shanghaid to the tankers.
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  #16  
Old 7th March 2007, 22:50
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It was lower hold, orlop deck, and in some cases, upper hold!

As for deep tanks, we regularly used to carry bulk liquids such as latex and coconut oil in them. If it was latex, we had to get the tanks waxed in Hong Kong before we went to Port Swettenham to load it.
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  #17  
Old 8th March 2007, 07:48
Keith Adams Keith Adams is offline  
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PSNCs "S" Class ships were Shelter Deck with the 2nd deck lower as Tween
Deck, then Lower Hold, whereas the much older "L" Class ships were Tween Deck, Orlop Deck and Lower Hold. Other companies I sailed with had Tween Deck, Lower Tween Deck and Lower Hold. Usually the Lower Hold in the hatch immediately abaft the Engine Room also had its lower section fitted with DeepTanks for Dry Cargo and/or Liquid Bulk Edible Oils...just to confuse the issue! Snowy
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  #18  
Old 28th March 2007, 17:50
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Orlop Deck

The Titanic had an 'Orlop' Deck. It was her second deck up, just above the coal (bunker) storage spaces. Go th 'Google', click on 'images', then type 'orlop/deck' and click 'search'. There are many images of orlop decks there.
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