Films at Sea 60's to 70's - Ships Nostalgia
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Films at Sea 60's to 70's

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  #1  
Old 12th September 2014, 17:49
david freeman david freeman is offline  
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Films at Sea 60's to 70's

Who rememvmbers those wallport boxes recieved on board, and full of 'B' Movies and horse oprea's, and on an evenings showings, especially round the cape those BP Safety Films? These could be the highlight of the evening? What say you all. Can you remember the individual subject content, a lollipop to the winner paid out his own bond.
I remember the unattached/unsecured ladder up to a derrick spar, used alledgedly for paiting or inspection of the top block??
What is your subject???

Last edited by david freeman; 12th September 2014 at 17:51.. Reason: reread
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  #2  
Old 12th September 2014, 17:56
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Nick Batstone Nick Batstone is offline  
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I'll never forget the galley one where the steward puts the glasses in the sink and then the galley boy starts the strap up. It's only a matter of time before the water turns red, you know it's coming but still makes you cringe.

Sometimes they were better than the movies. I remember one ship we used to watch them backwards
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  #3  
Old 12th September 2014, 21:06
Gareth Jones Gareth Jones is offline  
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The only one I remember is where an AB is sent up with a bucket to clean the radar scanner - and the sparks decides to make some adjustments switches on the radar, and of course knocks him off!
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  #4  
Old 12th September 2014, 21:19
stevekelly10 stevekelly10 is online now  
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Who could forget the one with the bacon slicer!
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  #5  
Old 12th September 2014, 21:49
veste veste is offline  
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The film " Fire down below" springs to mind, filmed in Swansea on the British Princess about 1960.
Greaser Martin starts a fire when drying clothes on a radiator in his cabin.
Probably saw the film about 6 times, very good film.
Remember looking after a girl aged about 2 badly burned on an electric fire, she fell onto it and her head stuck to the element, she had many operations over the years to try to correct the damage done in a little time when the parents left her alone in the room.
Regards veste.
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  #6  
Old 12th September 2014, 22:10
OilJiver OilJiver is offline  
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[QUOTE=veste;1046442]The film " Fire down below" springs to mind, filmed in Swansea on the British Princess about 1960.

Narrated by Alan Whicker if I remember correctly.
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  #7  
Old 12th September 2014, 22:22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stevekelly10 View Post
Who could forget the one with the bacon slicer!
The Cook in question was one Les Hawkins from Newcastle. The film was the Bain of his life. It followed him round the fleet.
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  #8  
Old 12th September 2014, 22:29
Graham Wallace Graham Wallace is offline  
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Movies at sea ca 1958.

I joined my first ship the British Empress at IOG 5th September 1958, There were two EC’s Alfie Thomason(from Swansea, met him again around 1966, wonder where he is now ?)and myself.

I think the two Navigating Apprentices JM Illingham and Gordon Macmillan were delighted to get two more apprentices to join, even though we were not Navigating types. However we were soon to be initiated into “Movie Time”. For the life of me I cannot remember the frequency of movies shown but I think we had something like 5 in a big tin box. These 5 movies had to last until we reached any port where we could exchange the whole box with another ship. Not bad if you were on Scandinavian ‘cruises’ but not so great if you happened to be on a 32000 tonner at slow speed (10 knots) on one boiler around the Cape, next stop Durban.

In this case however the Empress was back and forth across the North Sea other than one surprising Abadan trip and back to Stockholm via the Kiel Canal. The Empress was an oldie Three Castle 12000 tonner, Officers saloon ‘amidships, Crews mess aft. The two Navigating Apprentices had been showing the movies both amidships and aft. Fresh meat meant they could split the task, naturally after a short induction course. Then we “ split/shared “the load, NA’s amidships, EA’s aft, how nice of them, but they were only movies, so what!

Now a slight problem occurred, each Movie was on 3 reels; I really cannot remember but I think we rewound each reel after it finished, so chance for a breather before moving in to the next reel. OK, so no problem off we go and usually things went well, the crew aft could be more bolshie than amidships!

My most amusing experience was getting so absorbed with the movie which seemed to be running well was eventually a scratching noise from the floor and looking down found to my horror a huge amount of film had come off the rear spool. Emergency stop!, I guess we had to hand wind the mass of film onto the rear spool before getting back to the movie, unscheduled stop, more beer. I never lived that down for quite some time.

The only movie I remember was,” Jail House Rock” that was played more than once. BP Safety films? What were they?

Graham
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  #9  
Old 12th September 2014, 23:29
Irvingman Irvingman is offline  
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I remember the safety film with the AB putting on an oversized pair of saltwater hardened leather palm gloves then starting to descend a ladder into the hold. Unable to grip the rungs properly his hands slipped out of the gloves and he fell into the hold below as the camera stayed focused on the two gloves still attached to the rung!
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Old 12th September 2014, 23:36
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Then there was the one with the bloke aloft who drops a Deck Knife and it sticks in the deck between a sun bathers legs.
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Old 12th September 2014, 23:44
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One of my favourite films was "Two for the Road" Albert Finney & Audrey Hepburn starred.
Set in France over a period of years and about the various road trips they did over there.
Gawd knows how many times I saw it.
Rom Com, Road Movie, bitter sweet. Great entertainment.
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  #12  
Old 13th September 2014, 01:12
paddy mcdonnell paddy mcdonnell is offline  
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films at sea

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick Batstone View Post
I'll never forget the galley one where the steward puts the glasses in the sink and then the galley boy starts the strap up. It's only a matter of time before the water turns red, you know it's coming but still makes you cringe.

Sometimes they were better than the movies. I remember one ship we used to watch them backwards


I never was on a ship that showed movies,maybe it was a tanker thing,although I did sail on a couple of T2s. I remember we were in Littleton NZ and an American war ship was on another dock just across the way and the showed movies every night on a big screen,
we use to watch but it got boring because we couldn't hear the audio.
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  #13  
Old 13th September 2014, 09:35
DaveM399 DaveM399 is online now  
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I remember one film night, the reels got mixed up and reel 3 was shown before reel 2! I don't remember the film but nobody noticed until the credits rolled after just two reels!
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  #14  
Old 13th September 2014, 16:42
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twogrumpy twogrumpy is offline  
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The fire prevention film shown when I started my apprenticeship had the line, "Remember men, not only are fires expensive, they also act as beacons for enemy bombers"
This in 1964, perhaps the clue was that they were all wearing gas mask cases.

Last edited by twogrumpy; 13th September 2014 at 21:05..
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  #15  
Old 13th September 2014, 19:14
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I remember those films so well. There is another thread somewhere about the safety films, which were I think not BP but British Shipping Federation and very very clever.

The bacon slicer and the one about shutting a watertight door on your hand both come unpleasantly to mind. The brilliant part was the gore was mainly in our imaginations. Most of the guys covered their eyes when those bits were on.

Learning to run the projector was an essential early skill for the cadets and the sure way to a miserable life if you got it wrong.

My recollection is that the boxes had 3 films: usually a fairly recent big film, some old B-feature and often a foreign film usually french or italian with terrible dubbing and no discernable plot.

nina
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  #16  
Old 13th September 2014, 20:24
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On one ship we had the James Bond film "From Russia With Love" for many months, without opportunity to swap it with another ship. Once seen, it would be fair to say that most Bond films did not support repeat viewing. This one was different, and was often taken out for showing. Well, to be accurate, just one reel of it was used, almost every week. It was the reel containing the sequence where Bond visited a Gypsy camp and a fight developed between two busty gypsy girls.

I even went down to the smoke-room before breakfast one morning, to replace a book that I had finished reading the previous night. The deadlights were down and the place was in semi-darkness. Apart from the flickering light on the screen on the bulkhead that is, where two busty girls were tearing at each other's clothes as they wrestled around a blazing fire. The off-duty engineers were having an impromptu viewing.
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Old 13th September 2014, 20:40
borderreiver borderreiver is offline  
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On the Kazamah we had in the amidship dinning salooc a tablecloth which was very valuable given to the ship by the Sheikh of Kuwait. The projecter use to placed on top of this cloth which a thick cover. One day the bulb went so I took the old bulb out placed it on thetable were it bunt a large hole through the cloth.kept quite about it till now.
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Old 13th September 2014, 22:09
OilJiver OilJiver is offline  
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There are those bulbs again. I’m not an ex BP guy but I guess like many others here, I have some good memories of (reel to reel) movies as shown on some Saturdays (16:30/20:30) at sea. Memorable not for the films being shown, but for the event that it was. As Nina says, the job of volunteer projectionist was never for the faint hearted – plenty of stick being dished out if things didn’t run smoothly. One such occasion comes to mind when, after the projector failed, the poor guy operating it stood up and announced through the dim light, that he thought the “bulb” had gone. Not only did he come in for all of the usual booing and offensive banter but he was heavily pelted with (empty) beer cans for his error. Not an isolated case of course and certainly not the worst of behaviour ever displayed. Regrettably though, an event unlikely to ever recur.
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Old 13th September 2014, 23:04
chrishandel chrishandel is offline  
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I remember sending a 2 R/O ashore in Mina Al Ahmadi to change the films only to have him detained by the local military because one of the films was 'Fiddler on the Roof' starring Topol. We eventually recovered him and the same box of films was sent back.
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Old 13th September 2014, 23:22
Graham Wallace Graham Wallace is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OilJiver View Post
There are those bulbs again. I’m not an ex BP guy but I guess like many others here, I have some good memories of (reel to reel) movies as shown on some Saturdays (16:30/20:30) at sea. Memorable not for the films being shown, but for the event that it was. As Nina says, the job of volunteer projectionist was never for the faint hearted – plenty of stick being dished out if things didn’t run smoothly. One such occasion comes to mind when, after the projector failed, the poor guy operating it stood up and announced through the dim light, that he thought the “bulb” had gone. Not only did he come in for all of the usual booing and offensive banter but he was heavily pelted with (empty) beer cans for his error. Not an isolated case of course and certainly not the worst of behaviour ever displayed. Regrettably though, an event unlikely to ever recur.
Volunteer, who mentioned volunteering, we were pressed ganged!

And down aft with the crew could be most 'entertaining'.
Graham
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Old 14th September 2014, 01:44
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I don't think it was a written rule, but as I recall it was good etiquette to rewind the films before passing them on.
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  #22  
Old 14th September 2014, 02:59
Tony Maskell Tony Maskell is offline  
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The BP Safety Films where the "Sailor" falls from the mast, was made on the laid up ships in the Fal during the summer of 1960. It took then three days to make just two small safety films, The "falling" sailor was actually a dummy and the effect achieved by camera angles. I was there! The "fire" film made in Swansea, the effect of the fire was achieved with low troughs with kerosene in the scuppers and then filming from below the line if sight of the scuppers.
We had some 5 people to make those films on the Fal, a Director, two cameramen, and two men who acted as "sailors"!
Tony Maskell
ps. Nina is correct there were 3 full lengths films in each box, Our Indian crews loved their "Yippies", they once sent a delegation up to me when I was C/O for an extra showing of a particular "Yippie" - can't remember its name now - that was 47 years ago now!!!!
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Old 15th September 2014, 15:11
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Not BP but when I was with P&OCL we got a box of films and the R/O (Kevin Gorne - not sure about the surname spelling) recognised one title and said that he starred in the safety film at the start - once we had seen it he would tell us the story.

So we settled down and sure enough the film was set on one of the Far East Bays (Tokyo?) and revolved around a hydrogen explosion in the battery locker after Sparky had been careless (Think it was an uninsulated spanner ).

Seemingly the director had said that once Kevin had pretended to drop the spanner he would set off a couple of thunderflashes in the battery locker for effect!! He failed to make the connection between an accidental spark potentially causing an explosion and the danger of a thunderflash potentially causing an explosion.

I can't remember how they simulated the bang but it most certainly wasn't with a firework!!
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Old 15th September 2014, 15:43
Scelerat Scelerat is offline  
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I always enjoyed the "Walport horror film" set in a galley. Sink full of sharp knives hidden from view by the soapy surface. Galley boy/cook using a cleaver to open a large tin of tomatoes. Galley boy plunges his hands into the sink, the water turns red and he screams. The other bloke is distracted, turns his gaze towards the scream as the cleaver descends. Chopped tomatoes spill across the work surface as he also screams.
As Nina suggests, the gore was in our imaginations, but no less real for that!
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  #25  
Old 15th September 2014, 16:07
Jim Glover Jim Glover is offline  
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Remember the movies well when I sailed with BP and Shell ,best time was on the 12-4 watches and 8-12.1st reel before dinner and the rest after the grown ups had left the saloon.It was always something to look forward to and a few beers and a good laugh .
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