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parma

  1. PARMA

    PARMA

    The PARMA arrived at Delfzijl from Iquique on 8th November 1920 with a cargo of 4919 tons of nitrate. According to Dutch newspapers the voyage took 87 days and she was the first sailing ship after the WW1 arriving at Delfzijl directly from Chile. There she had been laid up fully loaded since 1915.
  2. Parma

    Parma

    Parma crewmembers at the capstan at port side.
  3. Parma in heavy weather

    Parma in heavy weather

  4. PARMA

    PARMA

    After a voyage of 90 days the German barque PARMA arrived at Amsterdam on 8th November 1922 with a cargo of phosphate from Iquique. She is seen here passing the Hem Bridge in the North Sea Canal.
  5. Parma

    Parma

    Dutch coaster Parma at Whitstable.
  6. Swollen sails

    Swollen sails

    Looking down on the forecastle of 4-m barque Parma ex Arrow (1902). Sails are well filled, the sea is sparkling with reflected sunlight, looks like good times.
  7. Parma

    Parma

    Built as Arrow by Rodger, Pt. Glasgow in 1902 for Anglo Am. Oil Co. of 2971tons. In 1912 she went to F. Laeisz of Hamburg and was named Parma. In 1931 she went to the Australian sea writer Alan Villiers in company with the Åland captain Reuben De Cloux. And so recieved a bit of fame. In 1936 she had
  8. Wet work in the waist

    Wet work in the waist

    Wet work in the Parma. In heavy weather the deck was a more dangerous place than up aloft in a square rigger. One could simply by swept along and get ones head crushed on something in the way. Here most looks to be hanging on to the life-lines.
  9. Safety netting

    Safety netting

    Safety netting rigged in the waist of the Parma. It was a dangerous place, handling lee fore braces many were swept overboard. Many claim to have been swept overboard here - and with the next roll been swept back on board. Some probably telling the truth.
  10. Blown out foresail

    Blown out foresail

    The foresail blown out on the Parma, after a hurricane in April 1932. According to Alan Villiers, who took the photo, if the sail had not blown out, the ship would probably have gone right over. I remember when the Christian Radich was in trouble some time ago, some oldtimers blamed her synthetic s
  11. Two at the wheel

    Two at the wheel

    The 4mast barque Parma steering hard; two men are needed inside her whaleback protective wheelhouse. The Jarvis brace winch is seen in front of the jigger mast, the mizzen lower braces should be going from outside the hull to blocks underneath the jigger top and down to the winch (but I don't see th
  12. The Captain

    The Captain

    Captain Ruben de Cloux of the Parma fiddling with the sextant. His uniform probably wouldn't cut it among Cunard officers, but admittedly he's got a fancy name - doesn't sound at all Finnish to me. The ship was built as the Arrow in Pt. Glasgow in 1902. Hulked in 36, broken up in 38.
  13. No place for a girl?

    No place for a girl?

    Ship Parma in 1933. Outermost on the yard is apprentice Elizabeth, ‘Betty,’ Jacobsen, a Norwegian by birth, now a New Yorker, who spent the first five years of her life aboard her father’s ships. The Captain of the Parma had assured her that she could be an apprentice, but. ‘No woman will ever be a
  14. Unwanted?

    Unwanted?

    Apprentice Elizabeth Jacobsen (on the left) and passenger Ruby de Cloux (Captains daughter) on the chart-house-roof of the 4-m barque Parma in 1933. Miss Jacobsen wrote a book about her voyage, ‘A girl before the mast,’ NY 1934, where she tells that the rest of the crew liked her to stay aft, and go
  15. Unnecessarily dangerous

    Unnecessarily dangerous

    Look at the fourth man from the right, crouching down on the footrope. He's throwing a gasket (rope with which to fasten the furled sail) underneath the yard and upwards for the man on his left to catch - this in heavy weather. Many men were lost in this operation, unnecessarily. On later ships ther
  16. No ladder?

    No ladder?

    I see a boy entering the forecastle deck having gone up on, or lowering himself onto, a single rope, above the one sitting on the stage. Shouldn't be much of a problem for these two deep sea monkeys actually. Ship Parma.
  17. Passat and Parma

    Passat and Parma

    Passat and Parma in Hamburg in 1931. The Parma on the right was built as Arrow by Rodger, Pt. Glasgow in 1902 for Anglo Am. Oil Co. of 2971tons. In 1912 she went to F. Laeisz of Hamburg and was named Parma. In 1931 she went to the Australian sea writer Alan Villiers in company with the Åland captain
  18. Parma

    Parma

    Built as Arrow by Rodger, Pt. Glasgow in 1902 for Anglo Am. Oil Co. of 2971tons. In 1912 she went to F. Laeisz of Hamburg and was named Parma. In 1931 she went to the Australian sea writer Alan Villiers in company with the Åland captain Reuben De Cloux. And so recieved a bit of fame. In 1936 she had
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