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20180924-1000 ft LOA, Beam 105 ft, Depth 56 ft.jpg

American Integrity-Departs Duluth, Minnesota; United States of America

The view is looking south that is the Pier B Resort with its Silo's Restaurant. That area used to be a cement plant built in 1917.

At the southeast corner of the hotel alongside the bay is an outdoor swimming pool and sun deck. Note the bridge spanning the end of the east slip. You can see a white yacht docked there. That bridge slides towards the hotel to open allowing power and sail yachts to enter the slip.

Please see:

http://zenithcity.com/archive/parks-landmarks/huron-portland-cement-terminal/

Those four Silo's are all that is left of the cement plant. Prior to the cement plant this entire area was two north south rows of very high piled coal with slips on both sides and four very tall bridge cranes running on railroad tracks on each slip.

Lets pretend that you slip behind the wheel of that white window van parked at the hotel main entrance. Drive north, as you pass the hotel sign, jog to the left and continue driving north. When you get almost to Railroad Street note the two metal contraptions sitting on both sides of the entry.

In that era cement was lifted in small bulk carriers. These gadgets were used to unload the cement. Plunging that pointed bottom gadget into the load when the gadget begins rising a door shuts at the bottom trapping the cement. When they wish to unload it a trip lever caused that bottom door to open and dump the cement.

Built in Duluth ex USCG # 404 cutter Sundew is now Jeff Foster's yacht. Jeff owns Jeff Foster trucking and is a part owner of the Pier B Resort. After Maria Jeff sent semi tractors with both package vans and tanker trailers to Puerto Rico.

The original URL with a length of 301 characters resulted in the following TinyURL which has a length of 28 characters.

https://tinyurl.com/yc7o5zfq

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Launched on 8 February 1944 and commissioned on 24 August 1944. The original cost for the hull and machinery was $861,589. Sundew is one of 39 original 180-foot (55 m) seagoing buoy tenders built between 1942-1944. All but one of the original tenders, USCGC Ironwood, were built in Duluth.

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During WW II these tenders went off-shore around the world via the St. Lawrence Seaway. Now we all know that the present St. Lawrence Seaway opened in 1959. Prior to that there were a series of relatively smaller locks between Lakes Ontario and Erie - the Welland Canal - and more small locks on the St. Lawrence River that allowed cargo vessels, known as Canalers, the size of these buoy tenders; to transit from the sea to Duluth.

20180924-Piers1-American-Integrity-+69F.jpg

Departs the 300 ft wide Duluth Entry Ship Canal.

Note the open side port - known on the Great Lakes as gangways - on the port side hull aft beneath the ship's name. There is a man standing there wearing khaki's - possibly a Marine Engineer?

With new laws passed since 9/11 Home Land Security has locked down most USA ship's harbors. This likely is the closest the public can get to any operating ship anywhere in the USA?

To access any and all harbor facilities requires a Home Land Security Picture Credential. There are different color and size credentials for vessel crews and those who work the harbor ashore. No credential no entry. I only tried once. Since then if I run across a sign that says keep out I do.

Last summer I drove south out of Duluth on US Highway 53 through Superior to the Allouez Wisconsin Taconite Loading dock. Then I drove the Superior Wisconsin waterfront until it ended in Billings Park. I continued on through Billings Park, now home to waterfront multi-acre walled estates with wide power gates and mansions.

The next day my sister Peggy came along with me and we revisited the Duluth docks we grew up on. Peggy is more daring/pushy than me? At the CN dock we drove in and there were no keep out signs. But when we reached a vehicle garage and parking lot I was going to stop but ... well we did not stop. We drove out on the taconite pier, piles of taconite pellets everywhere including on the ground, treacherous footing. We saw a Security golf cart parked in front of an office building but no one was there so we drove by and out on the dock.

In my rear view mirror I saw a uniformed security guard run out of the building so I turned around and drove to meet him. First thing he said "You can't be here!"

Peggy and I got out and we talked. Turns out he like us grew up on these docks. His Dad worked on the ore docks for DM&IR and often took his son to work. He was 56 and planned to retire at 62. He tried sailing but did not like it.

DM&IR trained him as a dock maintenance mechanic. He said that he was just 'holding down the fort since there was no one else there' that day. He wore just a security officer shirt. He and his wife plan to buy a motor home and go see all the places they want to visit. Peggy and I grew up walking these mile long docks to access the vessel where our father was an engineer and in the second half of his career Chief Engineer.

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20180924-American Integrity-Departs Duluth-1000 Feet LOA, Beam 105 feet, Depth 56 feet.jpg (117.2 KB)
20180924-Piers1-American-Integrity-+69F.jpg (123.7 KB)

Greg Hayden
Vista, CA USA
 

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Picture #1 really gives some idea of what 1,000 ft of ship looks like, particularly so with all the surrounding harbour scene for comparison.

Your tribute to your old town and its shipping is always interesting to read and look in on all it offers.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Samsette keyed:

re: Picture #1 really gives some idea of what 1,000 ft of ship looks like, particularly so with all the surrounding harbour scene for comparison.

Thank you, yes it does. Often the footers are further away from Pier B resort. When I saw Integrity close by I sat and watched until I got what you see.

Understand this is Denny O'Hara's Hillside Cam. All I do is press the ConTRoL + Print Screen keys on my keyboard at the same time and save the screen image to my machine. I massage it in Photo Shop Illustrator version eleven.

re: Your tribute to your old town and its shipping is always interesting to read and look in on all it offers.

My Dad sailed the Package Freighters 1937-1939 and while doing so he looked around at other fleets and applied and was accepted with the Shenango Furnace Company as 4th Engineer in 1940. My first trip to sea I was living in my Mom's belly August 1940. Shenango urged officers to bring families for trips in the summers. Few did and so once I was six I spent the bulk of summer school vacations aboard ship with my Dad. Prior to age six I could only go on trips with my Mom.

Here I am this little kid up in the pilothouse on 1st Mate Ole Neilsen's watch. In fog I got to stand there and watch the clock for four hours blowing the whistle three short toots every minute. What was interesting was that I could see the steam coming out of the whistle five hundred feet behind me later I would hear the sound.

I lived in the sumptuous 1905 Owners Cabin with private head and large shower. The whole head deck bulkheads and overhead were covered with what are known as Subway white six-sided Ceramic Tiles. The carpeted stateroom held a 3/4 bed and built in dressers and wardrobe. The stateroom bulkhead was covered with Oak paneling stained dark brown and varnished.

The Owners Cabin was within the Passenger Quarters and a short distance away was a pantry. The deck, bulkheads and overhead as well as the counters, refrigerator case, etc were soldered copper creating one piece, that Frank the porter cleaned with a hose, the water running down a drain in the center of the deck.

Frank - MG_009-E.jpg

I took this picture of Frank the Passenger Quarters porter. Before we went into port I used to help Frank cover all of the Passenger Quarters carpeting, with fitted tan canvas with grommets and twist things that were permanent fixtures around the perimeter. When we left port I would help Frank pick up the canvas take it out on deck and hose it off and leave it on deck to dry. Then we folded it up and put it into the locker where it lived.

Understand in port our iron ore or coal cargoes would be spilt on deck and tracked inside on our shoes.

There were two levels for the passenger quarters. On the spar deck forward were five large cabins each with a head and two twin size beds. Forward of the cabins was a dining room with a real working wood burning fireplace. Dark orange Ceramic pavers covered the deck, there was a long dark Oak dining table and Oak chairs, and comfortable plush leather seating. This dining room was rarely used for dining. Aft were a Crews Messroom, Officers Dining Room and Passengers Dining room all adjacent to the Galley.

One deck up was the carpeted Passengers Observation room. More plush leather chairs and several specialty tables made for different types of card games. All of the furniture was kept in place with shiny brass hooks and eyes. All of the raised thresholds were polished copper. Frank vacuumed all of the carpet daily.

Frank would leave a large glass cookie jar, with a metal lid on an angle, of my favorite chocolate chip cookies on the pantry counter and stock the refrigerator with bottles of Seven-Up and Squirt my two favorite soda pops. Bunch the Night Cook and Baker who daily made my delicious chocolate chip cookies, worked midnight to 8 AM and also prepared breakfast. I gained a lot of weight on Bunch's cookies.

In nice weather we accessed the pilothouse using outside ladders. In inclement weather we accessed the pilothouse by quietly walking into the Master's Office and used the carpeted stairs from his office up to the pilothouse. Master Pete Fischette, often slept during the day after he had to be awake all night. While running the Detroit & Ste Claire Rivers, or the Soo locks and the St. Mary's river.

The Masters and Chief Engineers both were required to be awake and near their workstations in confined waters. Both would do paperwork during those runs. When my Dad became Chief Engineer there was a steel staircase with a heavy insulated steel door from his quarters right down into the engine room operating platform.

There were rules that we kids had to follow. Until we were six we wore an adjustable leather buckle strap harness on our upper bodies, that Ole Neilsen made, with a leash attached to the back. We kids knew this was for our safety and never complained. My brother Jim, nine years nine months younger than me, had to wear the harness and leash until he was nine since he was great for darting.

One time at dinner Ole asked me if I wanted to wake up around 0400 for the Soo Locks and I said yes. I did not wake up when Ole opened the outside watertight door and clipped it back. When making a dock the mates made arm signals letting the Master in the Pilot House know how far off the dock the vessel was.

Holding both arms straight up above his head meant 48 feet off, arms straight out on both sides indicated 24 feet, arms hanging at loose at his sides 12 feet. So Ole is out on deck and hollering up to Pete in the pilothouse while opening and closing the inside light oak screen door banging the door to wake me up.

48 - Greg get up greg get up greg get up, 24 -- greg get up greg get up -- 12 greg get up and the vessel hit the dock and Ole hollers to Pete Up Against. I was awake then and dressed.

The business was exciting there were other kids in Duluth whose fathers sailed the lakes but as a percentage of the 100,000 Duluth populace a relative few.

Mom was born January 1912 Dad August 1912 Dad always told people that he married an older woman. Mom graduated high school May 1930 and began a four years nurses training course, at St. Mary's Hospital September 1930, Dad was a St. Mary's Hospital Maintenance Man. The first two years of Mom's training, days were spent in classrooms at The College of St Scholastica, a females only Catholic college. Evenings were spent doing scut work at the hospital, scrubbing floors, cleaning OR's and instruments and stuff until midnight. Up at 0600 they were back in class by 0700 they were bussed back and forth by a college owned school bus.

The third and fourth year days were classes at the Villa -- a slang term for St. Scholastica referring to the community of catholic nuns who lived there and taught in Duluth's catholic schools and the villa itself. The third and fourth year evenings were spent learning how to be a floor nurse. Mom graduated in 1934 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing and a State of Minnesota Registered Nurse license.

Mom and Dad met when Dad was walking all over the hospital carrying a toilet seat. He would walk up behind a nurse and fit the toilet seat to her butt and say -- nope -- then go on and do it again. When Dad did that to Mom by gum the toilet seat fit Mom's bun just right. Mom and Dad were both 5 feet 8. When she married Dad Mom made a commitment to herself, that when his ship came in she would be there. Dad would be in port for only three hours every seven days. But if while in the lower lakes they loaded a coal cargo they would be in about 36 hours. We did not have a car until 1952 and that car being a used 1941 Plymouth four door.

Mom would call a cab and take it to the Duluth entry piers and 'wave' Dad in. Then she would cab over to the ore dock. If it was daylight Mom would wait with the cab and Dad would come up and they go someplace. If it was at night Mom would be standing on the dock when they tied up and she went aboard. This continued when we kids came along.

If we were in school Mom would get a cab and come pick us up. Regular she got push back from the nuns but she pushed right back. "These kids father is in town three hours once a week. They need to see their father, their father needs to see them." Even if the nun said no Mom would take us out of school anyway.

When it was at night we would go aboard. Bunch would corral my two sisters in the galley and teach them how to bake. While Ole took me under his wing, this so my parents could spend some time alone in Dad's cabin.

So flash forward to when I graduated high school 1959 Dad told me I had three choices. Join the military, go to college, go to work. I tried to join the Navy but they would not take me since it was they, the US Navy, who found out that I was born with deformed hips. When I was a little kid for awhile I wore orthopedic shoes. I kept having problems with my legs and feet.

So I went with option two and went to college in Duluth. Education wise it was high school II, English, History and PhyEd although I really enjoyed the Introduction to Art class, but the rest I often skipped classes. I got very involved with on campus clubs. I would breakfast at home but then spend all day into the evening on campus eating lunch and dinner there. I would read the whole book for a class so I never completely failed but my grades were in the C & D range. After two quarters they kicked me out.

My Dad always said "No son of mine is going to sail." But that is exactly what I wanted to do. Darn, raise me in this exciting business, then tell me no. So Mom used HER industry connections to get me what I needed to get a Merchant Mariner Do***ent. So Dad comes in and asks where is Greg?

"He shipped out on the Edmund W Mudge as a coal passer." Dad said I would never last. But I did and as I moved up the ranks Mom told me that while he would never tell me to my face, that he would brag to others about me following him in his footsteps.

Mom-DadsOffice-E.jpg
Mom and me-E.jpg
Me and Mom-E.jpg
WWII-Dad-E.jpg

After laying up the SS Shenango in Buffalo December 1941 Dad took the train home arriving after Christmas. Dad could only stay home five days until he had to leave and go by train to Sheeps Head Bay, New York. Where he and other Great Lakes officers had to learn in 90 days how to be US Coast Guard officers. Individual ranks depended upon one's shipboard rank, here 3 A/E Dad is a Lieutenant. The Lake Carriers Association made a deal with USCG so that their shipboard officers would not be drafted.

Sheeps Head Bay today is the site of the US Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point, New York - New York City area.

Attached:

Frank - MG_009-E.jpg (36.4 KB)
Me and Mom-E.jpg (42.5 KB)
Mom and me-E.jpg (46.0 KB)
Mom-DadsOffice-E.jpg (57.4 KB)
WWII-Dad-E.jpg (53.0 KB)

SN is REALLY pissing me off. This is my second attempt to post this, the first time the post screen and the attachment screen just went away -- got all blank white - this has been happening more lately. I have been screaming some nasty words at SN

Well in the preview the pictures are not there this ******* site is driving me nuts.

Greg Hayden
Vista, CA USA
 

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Thanks Greg, great stuff and keep it coming. The Duluth cameras are one of my favourite sites. Our aim is to do a cruise and road trip through the lakes in a few years.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Cruises are thin on the ground there are some small ship cruises but that is all. A few years ago a German company ran between US and Canadian ports but eventually went away.

For a road trip there are two ways to cross Lake Michigan. The coal burning Badger is still running in the middle of the the state but now a newish 35 knot catamaran runs out of Milwaukee.

Greg Hayden
 

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https://www.lake-express.com/

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The Lake Express ferry made history as the first high speed auto passenger ferry in the United States on June 1, 2004 when it re-established the historic Lake Michigan ferry route between Milwaukee, Wisconsin and Muskegon, Michigan. Crossing Lake Michigan in just 2-1/2 hours, the Lake Express established new standards for Great Lakes ferry service, cutting hours from previous record crossing times and hours from the typical trip around Lake Michigan through Chicago’s congested tollway system.

The modern Lake Express launched with a full complement of modern conveniences and amenities not available elsewhere. Since that first crossing, Lake Express has continued to set standards for Lake Michigan, offering the more daily sailings and the longest operating season on Lake Michigan. Take the Lake Express ferry on your next trip and discover the freedom, relaxation and convenience that comes when you leave driving behind.

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Greg Hayden
 
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