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Discussion Starter #1
I have been watching on the "Travel Channel" the series "Alaska, the Last Frontier" about a family called Kilcher. Fascinating stuff. But I am intrigued as to why they hunt, kill and eat black bears, but Alaskan brown bears are off the menu? Perhaps our American subscribers can enlighten. Are brown bears protected by law? If so why, as they prey on the cattle reared by the Kilcher family.
 

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Brown bears are protected ( also known as grizzlies) and you can usually, depending on the territory of residence, only shoot one a year, Whereas,again depending on where you hunt and how you hunt, there may be a no limit on bags of black bears.

geoff
 

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I haven't seen the show, but it's probably the same family that gave us the singer Jewel (Jewel Kilcher).
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I haven't seen the show, but it's probably the same family that gave us the singer Jewel (Jewel Kilcher).
Yes, that is true. The young lady in question appeared briefly on the show with her child to introduce him to his grandparents and their unique way of life
 

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To each their own, l but l wouldn't be killing any such beautiful creatures.
They seem to kill anything that moves with the exception of the Alaskan brown bears. Black bears, squirrels, rabbits, ptarmigan, deer, ducks, moose, caribou, halibut and salmon are on the menu for the members of this family. Even the cattle they rear are sometimes on the menu. They must have stomachs lined with cast iron as they never seem to be bothered by gastric illnesses.
 

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You have to admire their resilience and can do attitude. It looks a difficult way of life when “we” can ring up the local supermarket and get food delivered.
That aside the scenery is fantastic.
Davie
 

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Very true Davie. I do admire their resilience and the can-do attitude of all of the adult members of the family. Otto mused that as a lad big game was virtually on their doorstep but now they have to trek miles to find any. The cattle drive to the head of the bay in the spring and the return in the autumn to the homestead is not without great difficulties, crossing two rivers, boggy sodden grounds and the coastal trek would challenge most people , but these folk just get on with it.
 

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We were out there seven years ago and talking to some of the 'true' Alaskans and the Canadians living in the Yukon they craved this sort of life and poured cold water on the many that had main homes in Oregon, down to Arizona, and who fled come end September till around Easter.

Called in a store on the borders and noticed a sign saying ice cream.....nope, we shut tonight (23rd September) and the next ice cream delivery is 14th April!

geoff
 

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There has been another program on tv about the Alaska railway,can’t remember channel.
Slightly more advanced in as much as the train was used to deliver supplies to the “off grid” people. Still again the people involved were,can do, and in some cases not young.
Must admit, I feel like a wimp when you see how they overcome adversity.
Davie
 

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If you flick between Quest on Freeview 37 and Travel Channel on 42 there are a variety of such programmes.

geoff
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Aye Davie, I have seen a few episodes about the Alaska railroad. Some fascinating insights as to how they keep the railroad running in the harshest of winter conditions.
 
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