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Harry, is this where you have your workstation?
Then you posted it in the wrong thread.
Also we like to see a picture on the inside as well like to know where you get the power from.....
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Mac said:
Holy Island (Lindisfarne) Northumberland. Fishermens gear shed.
Thats right Mac, there is a row of them on Holy Island. An enchanted row with grey beards sometimes sat in the doorways in the sun.
R651400 is right with 'upturned boat' but not 'lifeboat'. Any offers for what sort of boat and when it might have been in the water last, and what it was used for?
The power to make the greybeards tea comes from little camping stoves.
I would like a work station like this.
 

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To big for a northumbrian coble was it not the old coal lighters which used to take out stores to the lighthouses on Farne Islands.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
So it is Frank. A huge coble, they were all about that size arranged in a row above high water at the old landing beach in a shallow tidal bay. One of the old chaps told me they were last in the water about 60 years ago and had been used for the herring fishery. I'm not used to seeing cobles so big, the ones on this coast are small two men boats, but those Lindisfarne boats were manned by 5 and carried a sail apparently. I've had to revise my idea of what a coble is.
I got really interested in these hulls because on doing my family history it appears my ancestors came to grief off Hartlepool in 5 man cobles at times in the 17th & 18th c. My family fished out of Hartlepool in cobles from about 1580 to 1920.
Here is an entry from the parish register:
Burial 20 August 1642: Tho. Wilkinson, Wilyam Oliver, Peeter Horsley, Jo. Hutton, Margret Flecke. Drowned in a five mans coble.

My mother was a Horsley.
 

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It was your second image that put the idea into my head....An old uncle of mine used to take a bunch of us kids up to Scarborough during hols...There was a couple of elderly guys doing runs along the beach front in a large vessel (for the kids)..Old uncle used to call it a Coble, and always remember one of the kids, Micky shouting and singing "Lets hobble to the Coble".
Regards
Frank
 

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Harry
I'm sure you are correct, they are cobles, which according to the Oxford Concise Dictionary are flat bottomed fishing boats in Scotland and north east England.
In this case size does not matter.
From memory cobles were fishing boats which could be quickly dragged up above high water by horses and latterly tractors. Sad to see that there were few of these boats left on my last visit to Newbiggin in Northumberland last October, as compared to twenty years ago.I too had ancestors who fished on this coast.

Cheers
Mac
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Hello chaps, thanks for those posts. Near us is the village of Sandsend, just north of Whitby. There is a man there who builds cobbles still, and his son is keeping the craft going.
I've read that these cobles (pronounced cobble in Durham and Yorks, and coeble in Northumberland) are ancient North Sea boats which descend from craft the Danes and Vikings used.
Another boat that interests me from history is the 'hoy', I've never seen a sketch of one. One dictionary describes it as an inshore craft and I wonder if it also was a large coble. There are several references in Hartlepool parish register of people being drowned out of hoys, but none after 18th c to best of my knowledge. Has any of you a really good reference book or encyclopeadia?
 

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What is a Hoy?

Harry,

Extract from the Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea:

"Hoy, a small coastal sailing vessel of Dutch origin of up to 80 tons. In England where it becan to be used inthe 15th Century and continued to be for the next three centuries, it usually had a single mast and a fore-and-aft rig, sometimes with a boom and sometimes loose-footed. It was used largely for carrying passengers from port to port. Hoyw in Holland mainly had tow masts - usually with lugsails on both."

Now I really must tear myself away from SN and start doing some work!

Regards,
 

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Harry Nicholson said:
Hello chaps, thanks for those posts. Near us is the village of Sandsend, just north of Whitby. There is a man there who builds cobbles still, and his son is keeping the craft going.
I've read that these cobles (pronounced cobble in Durham and Yorks, and coeble in Northumberland) are ancient North Sea boats which descend from craft the Danes and Vikings used.
Another boat that interests me from history is the 'hoy', I've never seen a sketch of one. One dictionary describes it as an inshore craft and I wonder if it also was a large coble. There are several references in Hartlepool parish register of people being drowned out of hoys, but none after 18th c to best of my knowledge. Has any of you a really good reference book or encyclopeadia?
Ahoy,
Here some info:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coble
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks Ruud, just had a look and thought it worth pasting here:

Coble
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
A coble is a type of open decked fishing boat. This style of boat is traditionally used on the North East coast of England, from southern-most examples found around Hull, to Berwick-upon-Tweed on the Scottish border.

The distinctive shape of the boat - flat bottomed and high bowed - arose to cope with the particular conditions prevalent in this area. Flat bottoms allowed launching from and landing upon shallow, sandy beaches; an advantage in this part of the coast where the wide bays and inlets provided little shelter from stormy weather. However high bows were required to sail in the dangerous north sea. The design contains relics of Norse influence, though in the main it is of Dutch origin.

Cobles were clinker-built locally, where needed, without the use of plans. The skill of the craftsmanship on many boats gave them a long working life. They were notorious as being dangerous to sail for an inexperienced crew, but in the hands of experts could be both safe and fast.

Today, surviving cobles are generally powered by diesel engines, removing the need for the distinctively shaped 'lug' sail. In a further concession to comfort, the bow is often covered by a tarpaulin shelter.
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Thanks Brian for the info on the 'Hoy'.... I don't suppose there's any link with Ruud's greeting phrase 'ahoy!'... surely not... but then?
I've been looking through the Hartlepool register again for refs to Hoy (its not indexed so well) and found this :
22 Nov 1675 Drowned upon Yarmouth seas in a five man boat. James Martindell, Mark Watt, John Hall, Robertt Burkin, Richard Wilinson and Peter Cuthbert.

Yarmouth is about 170 sea miles from Hartlepool... and in November! But it might have taken a good while for news to get back home, although the news probably came by sea. Anyway they were brave boys, it was likely to have been a big coble again.

Hartlepool seems a rough place these days but around 1640 it was more like the wild west without a sherrif, you should see whats in the register.
 

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More Hoy Polloi

Harry,

The sea voyage in such a boat between Yarmouth and Hartlepool does indeed sound daunting to us. But it has to be put into the context of the alternative modes of transport available at the time. I would think a journey between those destinations by road would to be made by horse or stagecoach in several stages and would have been equally hazardous and very long. The hoy would have provided an efficient and relatively quick mode of transport around the coastline. It would probably have been easier to make the journey in Roman times than when this accident happened.

Regards,
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Right Brian. By the way I notice I've been promoted to senior, without an interview and I might not want the job. How does it work and why havent you been promoted?
After what you said this morning I also switched off and went to do some work, fired a picture of a square rigger in the enamelling kiln, was a poor thing so have turned it into a Hubble Space type nebulae that might sell. Then got cold and came back in.
very distracting is SN.
 
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