Ships Nostalgia banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter #1

Contemporary descriptions of older ships, at least from the late 19th century onwards, often refer to the uppermost (continuous) deck as an awning deck, sometimes as a spar deck, or even as a shelter deck. I gather that this was one level above the main deck, a term which seems to have retained the same meaning to this day. It also appears that the volume thus enclosed was regarded as only partially contributing to the gross/net tonnage, and accordingly, that the quantity and/or type of cargo permitted in that space was restricted.
Perhaps these terms are no longer relevant, but I have been unable to find their definitions, or any explanation of the differences between these types. Nor is it clear why the space enclosed by such a deck should not count in full to the tonnage measurement.
Anyone in a position to clear away the fog? Thanks in advance.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,476 Posts
Awning deck, Spar deck and Hurricane deck are all the same. Usually the uppermost deck of a ship. Usually a light 'covered' deck... might have been just under a canvas awning or place to give some 'shelter'. (Not a shelter deck). Spar Deck... usually spare spars were stowed above the house on the main deck on a sailing vessel. None of these are included in the tonnage calculation. Shelter Deck is a partly 'enclosed' space. Example of the Shaw Savill's ICENIC. The whole midship was the shelter deck. The space was not permanently closed. At the forward end there was full shell doors, The after end of the house was not. The space could be carried for cargo. No steel door. Look closely at the photo. See the entrance to the Shelter deck, for protection this could be closed by heavy wooden planks above a very deep coaming. Part of the planks in position. When the after end was 'open' and no cargo in the space... no Canal Dues!

682397
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,476 Posts
AWNING DECK or HURRICANE DECK = covered space for passengers here is steamer DOVER. Possibly the main deck space might be called a shelter deck because the sides have openings.
682400
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,476 Posts
A slightly different way to think. AWNING DECK..... 'open at the sides'. SPAR DECK.... 'open at the top'. SHELTER DECK.... 'open at the ends'. :cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,113 Posts
A Shelter-Deck Ship – open or closed
Most ships of the 50"s and early 60"s had this capability of being considered open or shut. If the lady was not on a regular basis going down to her marks, the open shelter deck arrangement was more convenient. To change from one to the other was to take off the bolted steel doors in the t’ween deck openings between the hatches and replace them with wooden boards slotted either side of the space, to become an open shelter deck vessel, this altered your gross and net tonnages for the payment of harbour and light dues. - (these boards were then usually drilled out by the engineering department, leaving just enough space to hide the old fifty packets of woodbine cigarettes, and any other taxable 'goodies' from customs rummagers)

This practice seems to have disappeared through time, no doubt the regulations have changed too over the years.

The SD14's from A and P in Sunderland were shelter decker’s, built under licence around the world in their hundreds.

The Japanese Freedom ships that came out later were also shelter deckers.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top