Ships Nostalgia banner

21 - 40 of 109 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
My close friend Stuart LeFevre, previewed the book Rtd.BP Marine Superintendent- some of you may recall him. his comments " It is titled BP Tankers: a Group History by W.J.Harvey and Dr R.J.Solly, published by Chatham Publishing, ISBN: 1-86176-251-8, 272 pages, 500 photographs,(all b & w) Price £40.00
The authors make no reference to any source within BP relying heavily on publications such as The Motor Ship, Fairplay and Shipping World & Shipbuilding. It is an exhaustively researched record of every ship owned or operated by BP. It makes an excellent companion volume to Middlemiss's revised edition of The British Tankers that abounds with colour photos.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #23 ·
promar said:
Thanks for the information about the book. Have just received my copy in the post this morning (£32). From first perusal it certainly appears to be an excellent reference. Notwithstanding its focus on the tanker fleet I was a little disappointed to see the only photo of the "North Sea" vessels being represented by the Forties Kiwi. Your point about the fleet incidents like the 'Aviator collision and fire on the 'Queen are well taken, but there are probably so many that we are talking about another book!. Incidentally there is no mention about the British Baron and Duke, if my memeory serves me correctly, being designated towing vessels and equipped with special towing winches on the poop.
Welcome to the site Promar.
You're quite right - there must be so many anecdotes & other tales that could be told if only someone could amass them all & put them down on paper.
I believe the Baron & the Duke accomplished some quite long tows between them while they were in the Fleet. I seem to remember one story of the Duke towing the Princess, some time before the death of HM George VI. "The Duke with The Pricess in Tow" was, I think, picked up by the tabloids of that time as I remember seeing an article about it in the BP Apprentices Newsletter.
There are at least a couple of errors that I've come across so far but I haven't finished reading it yet.
Enjoy the site!
Kind regards,
John F.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
293 Posts
Welcome to the site Macjac. I sailed with Stuart LeFevre when I was a first trip apprentice on the Power from oct 64 to apr 65, a nice chap. He was the Xtra Mate at the time and I seem to remember he had a taste for Lapsang tea on the bridge after tea at 1800. He also had a penchant for the ladies I seem to remember. The Power was a good ship at the time as we had a good bunch amidships and all got on together well.
Regards,
Richard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
richardc said:
Welcome to the site Macjac. I sailed with Stuart LeFevre when I was a first trip apprentice on the Power from oct 64 to apr 65, a nice chap. He was the Xtra Mate at the time and I seem to remember he had a taste for Lapsang tea on the bridge after tea at 1800. He also had a penchant for the ladies I seem to remember. The Power was a good ship at the time as we had a good bunch amidships and all got on together well.
Regards,
Richard.
Here in Aberdeen there are quite few of Ex BP Mariners. We have annual get to together which Stuart usually manages to attend coming up from Devon. Stories about Stuart are so many they are worthy of a book! As for being a ladies man ...well I can support that but saying anthing more would compromise the rules of the forum!! Above all he remains a gentleman
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
promar said:
Here in Aberdeen there are quite few of Ex BP Mariners. We have annual get to together which Stuart usually manages to attend coming up from Devon. Stories about Stuart are so many they are worthy of a book! As for being a ladies man ...well I can support that but saying anthing more would compromise the rules of the forum!! Above all he remains a gentleman
I first met Stuart 1957 upon joining the "British Industry" (new) John Browns,
he 2/0 I as 3/0 and remained friends ever since. Yes a gentleman yes a ladies man, however mainly a character.
BTC apprentice 1946 incl time as c/o Abadan river tug Daneshmand and coaster Empire Tesella as 2/0 all this during apprenticeship.
Very involved at h/o in development of fixed tank cleaning and oil pollution for VLCC's. "Le Fevre's Folly" ( accepted Internationally) also in development of VLCC gangway towers, also in use worldwide.
Master British Patrol for a period, then took over from dear old Ronnie Marsh as head of Cadet Training.
Returned to sea final command "British Reliance" 265,500 DW
Marine Superintendent Marine Operations, this involved a lot which included for example being helicoptered onto the stricken "Christos Bitas" first aboard, off Angle Bay.
Thereafter the "Forties Field" called, and living in Aberdeen where he "enjoyed Life" playing with his rigs and boats.
Yes indeed, a character, a wonderful guy, with time for all, with a great love of the sea. Now enjoys an early morning swim every day, bowls,gardening, rotary club, Hon Company of Master Mariners, local environmental group etc. etc. etc.
His main claim to fame - he introduced his childhood neighbour to me in 1958 and she has been my wife for 46 yrs.
Promar, as for being a great ladies man - like yourself -- I will not compromise the rules !!
Regards,
Mac.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
278 Posts
Hello Promar yes it was the Baron & Duke that had the towing winches on the poop.I was on the Baron in 52/53 on a nine month voyage but we never got a tow in that time.Also spent some time astern of her on the Earl being towed back to the UK with a broken crankshaft,that was only half of the tow.The other part of the tow was by the Fame or Faith [cannot be too sure hope someone can verify which when they read] this,after breaking down 10 days out of Abadan bound for Mombasa,we ended up being towed down to Madagascar then change of orders for Aden,so it was about ship and all the way back up through the Indian ocean to Aden.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
573 Posts
With regards to the "British Queen" I was in her on the 29th March 65,off Daz Island, had just turned in when the alarms sounded, never moved so fast since, apart from when I paid off the "George Peacock", spent all night fighting the fire, Grey funnel line came along side in the morning in the shape of "HMS Ashanti", just to help us out after we had done all the hard work. A generous BP paid us half a months wages for saving the ship. Happy days. Trevor Page
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
richardc said:
Didn't the Patrol go "deep sea" in 1966 during the seamans strike along with the Workman. That must have been some trip. I was on the Centaur at the time and we spent weeks going from the Gulf to the Med via the Cape, a lot of the time at 12 1/2 knots.
There is an apochryphal story about when the Patrol had to her leave her long-time coastal trade pattern. Half way down the channel they suddenly realised that there were no sextants aboard. The trip to Port Said was interesting to say the least and followed a somewhat unathordox passage plan!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
Anyone out there remember a apprentice by the name George Munn from Ardrossan. he would have finished his time in 1964. I was in the Watt college with him , I will give the reason for this request later beleive it is honourable.
Argyll
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,389 Posts
Hello Promar,

I read your comments with interest. I'm trying to get together stories, memories of characters etc for a possible publication (see Major new project thread in BP Shipping forum), and it sounds like your man Stuart may be just of those people who may be able to assist with relaying some tales!

I note that you say he lives in Devon, well so do I!

If you could possibly put me in contact with Stuart, I'd be grateful.

Thanks,

Rushie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,484 Posts
John_F said:
Recently purchased a copy of the above book. It features photos of almost every vessel ever owned by the Group plus a short potted history of each vessel from launch to scrap. As a factual reference book it is very good but I was disappointed in some ways as there are very few anecdotes (& there must be many that could be told). For example, there is no mention of the collision between the Aviator & the Crystal Jewell, no mention of the fire aboard the Queen. However, the first few chapters on the development of the fleet from 1915 to the current day are excellent with plenty of illustrations & cutaway drawings of vessels & equipment. Not cheap at £40 but you can get a 10% discount if purchased direct from the publishers, Chatham Publishing. ISBN No:1861762518.
John_F
John, Is there anything from my website ( pics etc) in Ray Solly's book. He contacted me 2004 about info. I was wondering whether it was worth the $100 for me to get a copy?
Graham Wallace
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,484 Posts
Argyll said:
Anyone out there remember a apprentice by the name George Munn from Ardrossan. he would have finished his time in 1964. I was in the Watt college with him , I will give the reason for this request later beleive it is honourable.
Argyll
I know a George Munn , 1952 "Engineering" apprentice. Same guy?
Graham Wallace
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #34 ·
BP Tankers: A Group Fleet History

Graham Wallace said:
John, Is there anything from my website ( pics etc) in Ray Solly's book. He contacted me 2004 about info. I was wondering whether it was worth the $100 for me to get a copy?
Graham Wallace
Graham,
I couldn't see anything in there that had been taken from your website.
The Crown (& her tragic end) is listed with her details along with every other vessel that has been through BP's hands.
As a work of reference it is superb but there are few anecdotes so the human side of the story of the Fleet is sadly lacking but that probably was not in their terms of reference. For me it was worth the money.
Kind regards,
John.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
B P Tankers

Is there any mention of the B P Tanker British light that was at anchor at the tail of the bank when the Greek sugar ship Captayannis draged her anchor during a gale and collided with the anchor chain of the tanker ripping a hole in the CAPTAYANNIS wherafter she was beeched on a sand bank and has layen there ever since. Full story is available from www.clydesite.co.uk- the clyde's wreck-captayannis -the sugar boat
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
B P Tankers

Does any one remember the British trust that dates back to the mid to late seventies she broke down when discharging at finnart oil terminal Main engine failure and she was towed dead ship up river to the James watt dock Greenock Where she lay for several weeks while a local shipyard along with the ships engineers caried out repairs (Read)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #37 ·
BP Tankers

John P
In Harvey & Solly's book there is no reference to either the British Light incident or the British Trust's breakdown. As I said, there are very few anecdotal stories in the book - it is first & foremost o book of reference. If the British Light had sunk as well as, or instead of, the Captayannis then it would have been stated under the British Light's fact file. The incident has been mentioned before on this site & I think there is a photo of the wreck in the gallery.
I remember the British Trust well as I was Third Mate on her for 6 months. She suffered at least 2 breakdowns while I was on her in 1964 which involved changing pistons. There is a photo in the Gallery of one of her 1964 breakdowns http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/17603/sort/1/cat/503/page/1
The breakdown to which you refer must have happened in the mid 70s as BP sold her in 1976 to the United Freighter Corp., Panama & she was renamed Jinjiang. She was sold again in 1979 to the Peoples Republic of China (where many of this class seemed to end up) & renamedTa Ching 235. In 1980 she was renamed Da Qing 235. It was reported that she was demolished by 1995. If she lasted 45 years then she did very well.
Kind regards,
John F
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
hi all,
i wonder if anyone has a photo of british lady as i cant seem to find mention of her anywhere.we were on the bombay burma run in 1955.
thanks
john martin
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Anyone remember the "British Scout?" Probably the smallest of the fleet and consequently was capable of performing some intersting gymnastic movement. I believe I have a photograph of her alongside at Plymouth. I was lucky enough to see a beautiful sustained example of St. Elmo's Fire play from stem to stern, from rail to mast-head. Spooky!
 
21 - 40 of 109 Posts
Top