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Does anyone know of any sites with photos of ships being broken up. I know it's sad, but there is some sort of morbid fascination in it. I've seen a Canberra site which shows her scrapping, but I can't find any others.
there is an excellent site of facebook - called ship breakers with hundreds of images being beached
 

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The Norway was observed at Cape Town on 26 June reported to be heading for Port Klang, allegedly to be converted, but who knows? Big Red Boat II (Eugenio C) is being dragged ashore as tide allows, and Rita (Windsor Castle) is finally about to be beached after breaking down and having to be rescued by a tug - which then broke down too!!
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I wanted to respond to the people posting that they are looking for more pictures of shipbreaking.

Not to toot my own horn, but I am one of several photographers who have published an extensive set of photographs of shipbreaking in article and book form.

Some background: The first, that I know of, was Sebastiao Salgado, who went to Chittagong already in the 80s, when that industry was just getting started there; you can see these pictures in his tome Workers, which I highly recommend in general.

I went in 1997-98 with a US tanker, the former Mobil Meridian/Seminole, on her last voyage from Baton Rouge to Chittagong (now called Chattagram) on a US Gov't PL-480 Food for Peace grain run, and stayed for 5 months on the beach to watch her demolition and recycling, returning several times thereafter to do***ent daily life in Bangladesh, with and without the recycled steel. That project was finally published in book form as Shipbreak by Ed. Patrick Frey (Zurich) in 2015, and it has pictures recounting the entire ship's life, from old launch photographs I dug up and interviews with former crew members, to the last voyage and breaking, and ultimately its recycling into everyday objects and building rebar. The pictures are mostly (but not all) black and white, and there is a good bit of text to go along with it. I've attached some pictures from that series here and which you can see on my eponymous website.

Then came Ed Burtynsky in about 2003, who made a big splash in the art world with his large format, color shipbreaking pictures, also of Chittagong, which you can find in any one of his books, though not in one dedicated volume, and on his website.

In terms of photojournalism, the Baltimore Sun in 1997 published a piece on shipbreaking in Alang that initiated world interest in shipbreaking practices, and there continue to be pieces published in news outlets around the world on the subject. The Indian subcontinent holds a particular fascination for the particularly manual, Gulliverian nature in which the ships are taken apart, even though breaking happens in a more mechanized fashion in many places (and has since the 70s, when ships in places like Taiwan were cut up in a jiffy at the dock). These journalism pieces are OK, but they tend to say the same thing over and over again. Because getting access to the yards has become so hard, the photographers are never in there for long enough to get much of anything. The work tends to be characterized by a mere reiteration of the political issues surrounding the industry that do not ultimately touch the complexity of what you are seeing. It takes more access and more time to get in deeper. The scale of things is also disorienting; when you first go in, you don't know what to focus on, the workers or the ships, and if you try to get "everything" in one picture, you tend to get lost somewhere in between.

I unfortunately cannot refer anyone to more recent, in-depth do***entary work on the subject, but I know it's out there. There are films as well. You could comb the archives of Drik, a Bangladesh picture agency, for example, if you are curious. And as to pictures of individual ships, even though I am no longer on Facebook, I a guessing that this would be a resource.

I am happy to answer any questions about my experiences or the industry as a whole, which I did come to know at one time, and with which I still have some contact, but I am not on this forum that much. My email address is claudio AT claudio cambon DOT com.

Cheers!
 

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