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I sailed on the Spey in 84, when she broke her back in the Irish Sea we limped round to Rotterdam and spent the next 6 weeks there then left to New Zealand via the Panama,awesome trip. Loved the River boats, did 4 trips on the Trent, one on the Dart, One on the Spey, One on the Test
 

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Wonder who you are?...... 10 years late with this post as I've only just found this forum while looking for photos of ships to show my grandson :). I was the Lecky's wife on that trip from Scott Lithgow. What a terrible day that was when the two !ads lost their legs!! :(
Hi hornetbron,
That terrible day was recounted to me by my uncle Tony (Noel), along with the day 3 men died on the Renown, both of which he was Cat officer on at the time. Both of which had a profound effect on him, despite the praise he got for his first aid skills, and care in the aftermath of both incidents. His recollection of the coroner's enquiry after the renown was particularly moving.
Wonder if you remember him?
 

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She must have been an unlucky ship. when I was on her in the 80s one of the P.O forget to turn the fire hydrant valve off in the foc'sle head after Saturday routine maintenance and it was flooded resulting in the ship having to dock in Aden to clean out.
 

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Impression of BP River Boat

This is in impression of the River Class, though different building yards may have differences in their interpretation of the design spec. It is actually more specifically the British Tamar, due to it and the .. Esk having bow thruster.

Water transportation Vehicle Boat Watercraft Tugboat
 

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This is in impression of the River Class, though different building yards may have differences in their interpretation of the design spec. It is actually more specifically the British Tamar, due to it and the .. Esk having bow thruster.

View attachment 173330
I like that one, no tank lids, butterworth plates or valves. Cargo work must have been a breeze!(Thumb)
 

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I can remember joining that one. Smallest radio room I have ever seen, my cabin wasn't much bigger. Food was good though.
First tanker that I sailed on was the San Florentino, one of Eagle Oil's 18,000 dwt tankers (by the time I sailed on her she was owned by Shell Tankers), built 20 years before the British Tweed. Although the ship was smaller, her Radio Room was of a good size and my cabin, forward-facing on the deck below the Old Man's, was big with a double-size bed and en-suite facilities (shower, lavatory, wash-basin etc.). And the accommodation was air-conditioned. Doesn't sound as if BP had advanced much in caring for its employees over the intervening years.

Even Joe Shell's "H-boats", of similar vintage and size to the San Florentino, had an adequately-sized Radio Room and the officers' accommodation, although not quite up to Eagle Oil standards, was of decent size and quality.
 

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On the subject of accommodation, the BP Energy comes to mind, in a bad way.

Hard as it will be to comprehend, BP purchased in 85, a ship second hand from the Greeks, which though built in 76 was far below the standards we had grown used to.
There was no en-suite facilities other than for senior officers, there were two communal showers for the engineers along with one or possibly two toilets, the chief steward used the hospital facilities which he was kind enough to let us use, there was no provision for washing engineers working gear, other than a clean/dirty machine in the depths below the crew alley way.
As many had got into the habit of taking their wives to sea with them, I would say that the environment was not satisfactory for what was considered to be part ones terms and conditions.

The whole experience was like stepping back in time 20 years.

I would not have returned to the ship if asked, and one positive thing for me, was that on finding when we flagged out in 86 that the Energy was one of my group of ships, it was a great help speeding me on my way down the road to greener pastures.
 

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My reply to the same question in another thread.............

Quote:
Originally Posted by James_C View Post
fishcake,
It was only the Humber. She was also the only one built in Croatia. For reasons best known to the management at the time she was given a 'River' name, and as such was included with the other 15 'real' river boats on all company Do***entation and management etc.
[/I]
My recollections at the time were that the yard in Split (I think) were contracted to buld 3 vessels. Two were the Unity and Fidelity. For whatever reason the last vessel was delayed until the River class was built. Rumour at the time was that the yard did not have the technical ability to build a River class vessel, so BP settled for a third -ity boat but gave it a River class name (Humber) as it was being delivered at the same time as these.
I sailed on the Dart and Kennet, both good vessels with the exception of the boiler automation which was a nightmare.
Wasnt TODD COMBUSTION CONTROL by any chance ha ha Blohm & Voss Duel pressure boiler with Hamworthy Rotary cup burner?
 
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