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Discussion Starter #1
Have not seen any reference to CP on this site, I sailed on the Beaverboats from 1965 to 1970. Looking for anyone who sailed at that time. Sailed on Beaverelm, Beaverash, Beaverpine, Lord Strathcona, and Pacific Logger.
Had some great times, met some great people.
Geoff Bray
 

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"Beaver Elm" 3 voyages 1966.great little ship,would roll on blotting paper,great crew,great lakes trips.

"Empress of Canada" 1968.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
CP Ships

Hi Dave,
Were you the second Mate, I sailed with you, I was the fourth engineer
I think Aly White was the Old Man?
Cheers
Geoff
 

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Beaverfir

Geoff Bray said:
Have not seen any reference to CP on this site, I sailed on the Beaverboats from 1965 to 1970. Looking for anyone who sailed at that time. Sailed on Beaverelm, Beaverash, Beaverpine, Lord Strathcona, and Pacific Logger.
Had some great times, met some great people.
Geoff Bray
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Do you remember Beaverfir as my sisters husband was deck crew in 1966 John Vallis.He enjoyed the CP Beaver line.He said their ships rolled but enjoyed them.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
CP Ships Beaverfir

Bob,
Yes I remember the Beaverfir, I actually stood by on that vessel in London, it was the first ship I joined in CP. She was rather a small ship and crossing the Atlantic in the winter was a bit of a bind, even on the other beavers was quite a challenge, we had a wave come down the funnel on the Beaverelm one voyage. Every one on board would say "never again' at the time. But then next trip you would see everyone signing on again.
Happy Days
 

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Geoff Bray said:
Hi Dave,
Were you the second Mate, I sailed with you, I was the fourth engineer
I think Aly White was the Old Man?
Cheers
Geoff
Hi Geoff
Sorry mate, closest I got to second mate was when we tied up/let go,at the time I was AB, must admit most were good sh*ts.

'Beaver Elm' 21/02/66-24/03/66..Capt Williams
07/07/66-**/09/66..Capt Ford ??
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Beaverelm

Dave,
I just checked my discharge book and I was on leave both the trips that you sailed, however I did sail with both Williams and Ford. Bill Williams was bounced off the Empress vessels when he had that collision in the St Lawence River, and for one trip he sailed as mate under Basil Ford as old man,
That must have been tough because they were both buddies, and before the incident Bill Williams had been Commodore of the fleet.
There is a CP website for ex employees.
Cheers
Geoff Bray
 

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What date and year?

Geoff Bray said:
Dave,
I just checked my discharge book and I was on leave both the trips that you sailed, however I did sail with both Williams and Ford. Bill Williams was bounced off the Empress vessels when he had that collision in the St Lawence River, and for one trip he sailed as mate under Basil Ford as old man,
That must have been tough because they were both buddies, and before the incident Bill Williams had been Commodore of the fleet.
There is a CP website for ex employees.
Cheers
Geoff Bray

I remember my dad telling me they'd been hit sometime someplace on the River here. He was on the Sea Transport I believe, or the River Transport....

This the one hit?
 

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I remember the Pacific Logger, loading logs (of all things) at the Port of Astoria on the Columbia River, December 1969. It usually took a week, but the ship was tied up for two weeks or so due to some kind of problem, maybe rough weather. As I recall, the only reason it called was a longshoremans strike in BC. Crew was from Hong Kong. I have a picture or two somewhere.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Pacific Logger

Hi Tuna,
I was on the ship that voyage,we had previously loaded a cargo of logs in Coose Bay and had sailed for Japan on December 22, after two days out we hit one of the worst storms I'd ever been in. I was standing in the alleyway talking to the oldman and chief engineer and the chinese chippy came running up to us and said that number one hatch bilge soundings was 28 feet, we all looked at him and told him he must be mistaken, he said No!No! it's right. So the Chief Engineer agreed to go check it with him, we had cargo piled twenty feet on the deck, some of it forward had come loose and was hanging over the side.
The oldman went on the bridge and turned the ship leeward, and the C/E and chippy went up the fore deck, and sure enough the water was right up the sounding pipe, the ship was down by the head and we could not steer it on auto pilot, by this time all the chinese crew had their life jackets on, my crew would not come down the engine room. Captain ***mings decided to turn back for Astoria, it was the closest port. When we got along side, we put power on the windlass for tying up and everything was dead, the forcastle was full of water as well. The dockers did not want to go near the cargo at first for fear of it moving, but did eventually, when they opened number one hatch, the log cargo came up with such a rush, it all shot in the air... What a mess, this was only the ships second voyage from being built, all the hand rails on the forcastle were twisted like sticks of liqorice, and the ships name was on the water line when we finally tied up, I have some photos but do not know how to upload them on to this site.
We were there for at least two weeks with repairs and re-loading the cargo
The mate got fired for not making sure that number one hatch covers were battened down.
The Pacific Logger had replaced another CP Ship, that had sunk in the north pacific earlier named R.B. Angus.
Needeless to say I swallowed the anchor after that next vogage and quite the sea.
 

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Geoff Bray said:
Hi Tuna,
I was on the ship that voyage,we had previously loaded a cargo of logs in Coose Bay and had sailed for Japan on December 22, after two days out we hit one of the worst storms I'd ever been in. I was standing in the alleyway talking to the oldman and chief engineer and the chinese chippy came running up to us and said that number one hatch bilge soundings was 28 feet, we all looked at him and told him he must be mistaken, he said No!No! it's right. So the Chief Engineer agreed to go check it with him, we had cargo piled twenty feet on the deck, some of it forward had come loose and was hanging over the side.
The oldman went on the bridge and turned the ship leeward, and the C/E and chippy went up the fore deck, and sure enough the water was right up the sounding pipe, the ship was down by the head and we could not steer it on auto pilot, by this time all the chinese crew had their life jackets on, my crew would not come down the engine room. Captain ***mings decided to turn back for Astoria, it was the closest port. When we got along side, we put power on the windlass for tying up and everything was dead, the forcastle was full of water as well. The dockers did not want to go near the cargo at first for fear of it moving, but did eventually, when they opened number one hatch, the log cargo came up with such a rush, it all shot in the air... What a mess, this was only the ships second voyage from being built, all the hand rails on the forcastle were twisted like sticks of liqorice, and the ships name was on the water line when we finally tied up, I have some photos but do not know how to upload them on to this site.
We were there for at least two weeks with repairs and re-loading the cargo
The mate got fired for not making sure that number one hatch covers were battened down.
The Pacific Logger had replaced another CP Ship, that had sunk in the north pacific earlier named R.B. Angus.
Needeless to say I swallowed the anchor after that next vogage and quite the sea.
That jogs my memory. Everything on deck and in one of the holds had to be offloaded and there wasn't a lot of room on the dock, so it was trucked off to a storage lot. Officers and engineers had a bar, I remember one friendly Canadian fellow with dark hair and a full dark beard. There was a Chinese QM who loved American soul music, had a portable player when those things were not very common or cheap. Bermuda flag.
 

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Duchess of Atholl

My Father John Cullen was a crew member of the Duchess
when torpedoed 10/10/1942
see below references to the great ship
Dad arrived in Australia today will see him in a couple of weeks when he comes to Canberra he is 85 years young
Survival at Sea
Duchess of Atholl Duchess of Atholl - See John Trevor Liney Telegraphist An Atholl Survivor - See John Cullen's Story

www.gordonmumford.com/survive.htm

as a footnote dad and Trevor have spoken by Phone
some 62 years after the event
 

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Discussion Starter #18
CP Ships

Hi Nigel,
Thanks for the Pic of the Beaverpine, I spent a couple of happy years sailing on her as 3rd and 2nd engineer. I have some other shipboard Pics that I would like to post , but not very computer literate I am afraid.
Will have to put more effort into it
Thanks a lot anyway
Best Regards
Geoff
 
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