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I bought "Down the Burma Road"several years ago. The book is sub-titled "Work and Leisure for the Below-Deck Crew of the Queen Mary (1947-1967)". So if the Queen Mary's working alleyway was nicknamed "The Burma Road" what about the Queen Elizabeth? Or other Cunarders? Or other major British liners?
My late dad was mostly with the QE but also sailed in the QM and other Cunarders. I can only remember him referring to the working alleyway by its official name rather than by nickname.
 

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Having spent many years yarning and watching the world go by on the QE (1)
working alleyway, I never heard it called anything but "working alleyway"
 

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...and of course the working alleyways on the two original Queens were on opposite sides of the ships--can't remember which was port and which starboard, but they were planned that way in case both were in port at the same time, presumably at the same finger pier.
 

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In most Liverpool liners the working alleyway was called 'Scotland Rd' after a legendary major road (A59) in Liverpool which had a pub on virtually every corner, and which ran right through the areas of Liverpool and Bootle which were heavily populated by seamen and dockers.
Pat
 

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I remember this was a general nickname for the working alleyway on passenger ships in the fifties if my memory is correct. I sailed on P&O,Orient,Union Castle & Shaw Savill befote joining Cunard. Probably from ear'ier
wartime lads
 

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When I joined the RN in the early 1970s, the main internal passageway onboard warships (certainly from frigate size upwards) tended to be traditionally known as the Burma Road. This had obviously been the "norm" for many years but seemed to be a tradition which was in fast decline as the older ratings completed their service and left the Navy.
regards, Donald
 

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What was the definition of a glory hole stewards job.I only worked bye on the Parthia so never got to sail on a Cunarder, next was a blue star Tony
 

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It was called the Burmah Road on the Andes. By me at least. As I recall on most passenger ships I was on, some people called it the Working Alleyway, and others called it the Burmah Road. Both terms were commonly used on most ships.
The Working Alleyway on the Queen Mary seemed to go on for ever, dissapearing into the distance. At the bottom of the stairs at the after end was the catering staff bar, and up the stairs was the crew bar, which was also the after mooring space. A cold and draughty place, with open fairleads, winches, and mooring bitts etc.
 

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I once sailed with a guy who had worked the Queen mary. He reckoned he had the best job as one of the Alleyway sweepers. Sweep the length one way, smoko, suicide watch aft, smoko then sweep alleyway the opposite way.
 

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I once sailed with a guy who had worked the Queen mary. He reckoned he had the best job as one of the Alleyway sweepers. Sweep the length one way, smoko, suicide watch aft, smoko then sweep alleyway the opposite way.
I remember the suicide watch. On the After Docking Bridge. I never did it, being a boy rating. Very exposed as I recall, just canvas dodgers around it, and exposed to all weathers. We used to wash down the working alleyway nightly in 1967. In those days there was a two watch system, a 13 hr day watch and an 11 hr night one. On Nights it was mostly wash downs, working alleyway, and open decks from the funnels down. I'd reached the exalted heights of SOS by then. :eek:
 

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If I recall right (grey cells going a bit)there was a photo taken of the working alley on the QM as she did a bit too quick change of course at speed(ice I think was the reason)showing all the trolleys crew etc all along one corner, quite a few folk got hurt. this was in 60/61
 

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The Queen Mary,s Working alleyway was on the portside so the Queen Elizabeth was on the starboard. I know i was hospital attendent on both the hospit was forward and our cabins aft in isolation hospital. So we walk them every day Bob
 

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Burma Road/working alleyway as I said in earlier entry on this theme. Do recall though back in those days ,the fifties each winger/waiter had a morning scrubout out first thing on rising before passenger breakfas.ts/ Lots of said alleyways in older liners had wooden decks and scrub outs meant just that,hands & knees job .bucket of water a chunk of soap and hand scrubber/
No pansy mops in those days but quite often housemaids knee.
Stu
 

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Dickyboy,
Did you sail with a deck boy by the name of David Shopland on the QM in 67?
Sorry, I don't recall him.
I was only on the QM then for two or three weeks. Did a trip down to Las Palmas and back, then went over to NY and flew out from there to Bermuda to join the Franconia. I joined her on 22/3/67 and signed off on 4/4/67.
I was Deck/Bridge Boy in her in 1964.
 
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