Ships Nostalgia banner

1 - 20 of 85 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
Bought two of the above recently here in Napier,only resemblence to the real thing was the shape,can you still get a decent on in the UK.

Cheers, Len.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
194 Posts
yeah, Ginsters do a fairly good one, though Marks and Spencer are, I guess, as good as anyone, any of their food is good, followed closely by Waitrose.










ray..........................in Batley.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,648 Posts
You can get plenty here in Cornwall, the real thing not imitations.(Eat)
When I was living there in 1966, general agreement was that the best pasties in the Plymouth area were sold by Ivor Dewdney in Plymouth. I didn't try all of the alternatives but Ivor Dewdney's were very good indeed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
When I was living there in 1966, general agreement was that the best pasties in the Plymouth area were sold by Ivor Dewdney in Plymouth. I didn't try all of the alternatives but Ivor Dewdney's were very good indeed.
I am in the far west near Falmouth, the best pasties are the ones from small independent bakeries, there are always certain local ones that have good reputations if you are in the know.:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,040 Posts
Nearly all the ones from supermarkets, including M & S the last time I had one (admittedly probably 30 years ago), use minced meat so are not true Cornish Pasties.

After experiencing the real thing and then introducing my wife to them on a holiday in Cornwall we decided we didn't want the rubbish ones anymore. So the best way to get real Cornish Pasties here in Scotland is to make them yourself. Actually very easy to make as there are only a handful of ingredients in a true Cornish Pastie! Also fills the house with a lovely aroma!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
436 Posts
If you want a rally good authentic Cornish Pasties 2 that I favour is the McFaddens butcher in St Just baked on the premises and a small baker in Marizion they are a meal in them selves
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,124 Posts
There's a brilliant Cornish Pasty shop in Keswick of all places at the bottom of the market place, although I'm not sure what theyre calling them at the mo after all this stupid carry on about Cornish Pasties having to be made in Cornwall 'I swear' have people not got anything else to worry about than what other folk call their pasties?

My view is that the more folk who make a pasty and call it 'Cornish' the more it will pique peoples curiosity to visit Cornwall and sample the real thing (spending their hard earned wonga in the local economy to boot). Now my local bakers just call them 'pasties' dont look, taste, smell any different than they did before some small minded bunch of yokels decided the word Cornish was theirs, and theirs alone, pathetic......

Ah well that's me rant of the day oot the way, I'm off to enjoy the rest of the evening, might even bake mesel a pastie or two and call it what I damned well please.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Thanks for this,but as a Colonial,what is Swede ? I know the nationals,but I think that they would be reluctant to join the ingredients of a Pasty.Cheers....Doug
Here in Cornwall locals call a Swede a Turnip and vice verse just to confuse people.:D

Member of the same family as the Turnip but a bit larger.

Google is your friend:-http://www.fondation-louisbonduelle.org/france/en/know-your-vegetables/nutritional-assets-of-vegetables/rutabaga.html#axzz210i177Ut
 

·
Spongebob
Joined
·
9,335 Posts
Thanks for this,but as a Colonial,what is Swede ? I know the nationals,but I think that they would be reluctant to join the ingredients of a Pasty.Cheers....Doug

Doug, a swede is best described as a sweet turnip,usually larger than its relative and less pungent.
It is currently swede time here and its main use is as an additive to a good vegetable soup or as supplementary winter feed for the cows.

Bob
 
1 - 20 of 85 Posts
Top